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eBook Colonial Transformations in Venezuela: Anthropology, Archaeology, and History (Ethnohistory) ePub

eBook Colonial Transformations in Venezuela: Anthropology, Archaeology, and History (Ethnohistory) ePub

by Berta E. Pérez

  • ISBN: 0822364964
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Berta E. Pérez
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (August 14, 2000)
  • Pages: 356
  • ePub book: 1986 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1376 kb
  • Other: rtf azw docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 169

Description

This special issue employs the tools of history, anthropology and ethnology to address the relationship between the colonizer and the colonized in Venezuela.

This special issue employs the tools of history, anthropology and ethnology to address the relationship between the colonizer and the colonized in Venezuela. It examines various aspects of the Venezuelan oral-based cultures-including religion, gender, and trade-and argue that the indigenous and black populations were never "cultural islands"-neither before nor after European penetration.

Colonial Transformations in Venezuela book.

In Ethnohistory and Archaeology: Approaches to Post-Contact Change in the Americas, J. Daniel Rogers and Samuel Wilson . Deagan, Kathleen 1996 Colonial Transformations: Euro-American Cultural Genesis in the Early Spanish-American Colonies.

Plenum Press, New York. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Chueco Goitia, Fernando, and Leopoldo Torres Bálbas 1981 Planos de ciudades Ibéroamericanos y Filipinas, Vol. 1, Láminas.

Anthropology - Anthropology - History of anthropology: The modern discourse of anthropology .

Anthropology - Anthropology - History of anthropology: The modern discourse of anthropology crystallized in the 1860s, fired by advances in biology, philology, and prehistoric archaeology. The first generation of anthropologists had tended to rely on others-locally based missionaries, colonial administrators, and so on-to collect ethnographic information, often guided by questionnaires that were issued by metropolitan theorists.

Archaeology, History and Theory of Archaeology. Hunter-Gatherers and the Ethnohistory of Northern Eurasia

Archaeology, History and Theory of Archaeology. Online Publication Date: Jan 2014. Hunter-Gatherers and the Ethnohistory of Northern Eurasia. While the colonial encounter provided Euro-American intellectuals with the basic ethnographic subject matter for inventing the concept of ‘hunter-gatherers’, the term also expressed a uniquely Western interest in classifying the world’s cultural diversity into ascending social evolutionary schema, which in turn reflected the wider Enlightenment concerns with the mission of moral and economic improvement that were prevalent at the time.

Ethnohistory is the study of cultures and indigenous peoples customs by examining historical records as well as other sources of information on their lives and history. It is also the study of the history of various ethnic groups that may or may not still exist. The term is most commonly used in writing about the history of the Americas. Ethnohistory uses both historical and ethnographic data as its foundation

PDF Decolonizing Indigenous Histories makes a vital contribution to the . an associate professor of anthropology at the University of Nevada, Las. Vegas.

PDF Decolonizing Indigenous Histories makes a vital contribution to the decolonization of archaeology by recasting colonialism within long-term. The authors argue that these more complicated histories of colonialism.

Carrillo, Sonia Pérez 1989 La tradición indígena en las artes coloniales. In Ethnohistory and Archaeology. Haskett, Robert 1991 Indigenous Rulers: An Ethnohistory of Town Government in Colonial Cuernavaca. Plenum Press, New York. University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque. Hassig, Ross 1985 Trade, Tribute, and Transportation: The Sixteenth-Century Political Economy of the Valley of Mexico.

Subjects: Sociology, Archaeology, Anthropology.

ethnic studies, in American education, programs offering courses in the history and culture of minority groups. Ethnic studies arose as a result of the black protest movement of the 1960s, which, among other things, deplored the lack of cultural relevance for African Americans in the curricula of the . educational establishment. The contention was seconded by other non-European ethnic minorities.

This special issue employs the tools of history, anthropology and ethnology to address the relationship between the colonizer and the colonized in Venezuela. It examines various aspects of the Venezuelan oral-based cultures—including religion, gender, and trade—and argue that the indigenous and black populations were never "cultural islands"—neither before nor after European penetration."Colonial Transformations in Venezuela" also provides a much-needed ethnohistorical approach to tropical Amazonia in general. In light of current debates over the nature of the colonial occupation and the ecological potential of the tropical forest as a site for human complexity and development, the papers gathered in this special issue bring new kinds of arguments and important new data to these issues. The articles also indicate important new lines of research for the understanding of native histories in a modern age of global connections.

Contributors include Rodrigo Navarrete, H. Dieter Heinen. Alvaro Garcia-Castro, Rafael A. Gassón, Silvia M. Vidal, Lilliam Arvelo, Franz Scaramelli, Kay Tarble, and Nelly Arvelo-Jiménez