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eBook The Lord Cornbury Scandal: The Politics of Reputation in British America (Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History  Culture) ePub

eBook The Lord Cornbury Scandal: The Politics of Reputation in British America (Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History Culture) ePub

by Patricia U. Bonomi

  • ISBN: 0807848697
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Patricia U. Bonomi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press (February 28, 2000)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1629 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1631 kb
  • Other: txt lrf azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 950

Description

Patricia Bonomi argues that Cornbury's notoriety, especially as an alleged cross dresser, owes more to. .Bonomi's book is more than an exoneration of Cornbury. It is a case study of what she aptly calls the politics of reputation.

Patricia Bonomi argues that Cornbury's notoriety, especially as an alleged cross dresser, owes more to the complex operations of a culture of calumny and scurrilous gossip than to historical fact. Paperback: 304 pages. Publisher: Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press (February 28, 2000).

Chapel Hill : Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press. inlibrary; printdisabled;. Kahle/Austin Foundation.

Cornbury Scandal : The Politics of Reputation in British America. Now, Patricia Bonomi offers a challenging reassessment of Cornbury. The writer does indeed show how easily stories get garbled and tales get passed on as history.

The Lord Cornbury Scandal : The Politics of Reputation in British America. by Patricia U. Bonomi. A great deal of scepticism or, at least, critical awareness is needed when looking at the past. This is a very readable and lucid book.

Lord Cornbury Scandal book. Published March 16th 1998 by Omohundro Institute and University of North Carolina Press (first published 1998). She explores his life and experiences to illuminate such topics as imperial political culture; gossip, Grub Street, and the climate of slander; early modern sexual culture; and constitutional perceptions in an era of reform.

The Lord Cornbury Scandal - Patricia U. The Lord Cornbury Scandal. The Politics of Reputation in British America

The Lord Cornbury Scandal - Patricia U. The Politics of Reputation in British America. Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, by the University of North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill and London. The Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture is sponsored jointly by the College of William and Mary and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. On November 15, 1996, the Institute adopted the present name in honor of a bequest from Malvern H. Omohundro, Jr.

By Patricia U. Edward Hyde, Lord Cornbury, is probably the most notorious American colonial governor. Chapel Hill and London: Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture by the University of North Carolina Press, 1998. Governor of New York from 1702 to 1708 and after 1703 governor of New Jersey as well, Cornbury is widely known from a portrait in the New York Historical Society reputedly depicting him in women's clothes

UNC Press Books, 1 февр.

UNC Press Books, 1 февр. For more than two centuries, Edward Hyde, Viscount Cornbury royal governor of New York and New Jersey from 1702 to 1708 has been a despised figure, whose alleged transgressions ranged from raiding the public treasury to scandalizing his subjects by paradi.

In short, The Lord Cornbury Scandal is a model for tak-ing a.

In short, The Lord Cornbury Scandal is a model for tak-ing a single question or issue or controversy and using it. to unravel and illuminate a braid of interwoven matters. Fierce contests for political power were exacer-bated by the upheavals in English society.

Bonomi's book is more than an exoneration of Cornbury Stripping away the many layers of "the Cornbury myth," Patricia Bonomi offers a challenging reassessment of this fascinating figure and of the rough and tumble political.

Bonomi's book is more than an exoneration of Cornbury. A fascinating, authoritative glimpse into the seamy underside of imperial politics in the late Stuart er. Timothy D. Hall, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography. Stripping away the many layers of "the Cornbury myth," Patricia Bonomi offers a challenging reassessment of this fascinating figure and of the rough and tumble political culture of the First British Empire-with its muckraking press, salacious gossip, and conflicting imperial loyalties.

THE LORD CORNBURY SCANDAL The Politics of Reputation in British America . s the British Governor of New York and New Jersey from 1702 to 1708, Edward Hyde, Viscount Cornbury, was arguably the most powerful man in all the British colonies of the New World. But in a tour de force of historical detection, Patricia U. Bonomi, an emeritus professor of history at New York University, unravels the threads of the ''Cornbury legend'' to reveal a man whose reputation as a cross-dresser owes more to the vitriol of his Whiggish political enemies than to any evidence that he was other than an aggressive. imperialist and devout Anglican.

For more than two centuries, Edward Hyde, Viscount Cornbury--royal governor of New York and New Jersey from 1702 to 1708--has been a despised figure, whose alleged transgressions ranged from raiding the public treasury to scandalizing his subjects by parading through the streets of New York City dressed as a woman.Now, Patricia Bonomi offers a challenging reassessment of Cornbury. She explores his life and experiences to illuminate such topics as imperial political culture; gossip, Grub Street, and the climate of slander; early modern sexual culture; and constitutional perceptions in an era of reform. In a tour de force of scholarly detective work, Bonomi also reappraises the most "conclusive" piece of evidence used to indict Cornbury--a celebrated portrait, said to represent the governor in female dress, that hangs today in the New-York Historical Society. Stripping away the many layers of "the Cornbury myth," this innovative work brings to life a fascinating man and reveals the conflicting emotions and loyalties that shaped the politics of the First British Empire."A tour de force of historical detection.--Tim Hilchey, New York Times Book Review"Bonomi's book is more than an exoneration of Cornbury. It is a case study of what she aptly calls the politics of reputation."--Edmund S. Morgan, New York Review of Books"A fascinating, authoritative glimpse into the seamy underside of imperial politics in the late Stuart era.--Timothy D. Hall, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography"An intriguing detective story that....casts light upon the operation of political power in the past and the nature of history writing in the present.--Alan Taylor, New RepublicFor more than two centuries, Edward Hyde, Viscount Cornbury--royal governor of New York and New Jersey from 1702 to 1708--has been a despised figure whose alleged transgressions ranged from looting the colonial treasury to public cross dressing in New York City. Stripping away the many layers of "the Cornbury myth," Patricia Bonomi offers a challenging reassessment of this fascinating figure and of the rough and tumble political culture of the First British Empire--with its muckraking press, salacious gossip, and conflicting imperial loyalties. -->

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Comments

Rasmus Rasmus
The support community for heterosexual male transvestites in Vancouver, British Columbia, calls itself The Cornbury Society. The organization, like New York's famous Hyde Park, has taken upon itself the name of the third Earl of Clarendon, Edward Hyde, the Lord Cornbury, royal governor of New Jersey and New York from 1702 to 1708. These men, like most historians from the mid-19th century forward, believe that Governor Hyde was an exhibitionistic cross-dresser, who attended his own wife's funeral dressed in women's clothing, and cavorted about in society dressed as a woman, to the horror and condemnation of hundreds of spectators. This has been the historical legacy of Hyde for over 150 years, and it is Patricia Bonomi's task to not only refute these (and other) rumors, but illuminate the condition of politics and political discourse in the 18th century, and expose a long-standing bias in American history against royalists in general, and Tory governors in particular. She does this all in an engaging and descriptive manner, though with perhaps an insufficient degree of explanation of basic terminology and concepts (for example, she does not explain what she means by "Grub Street Press," a fundamental concept used from the first chapter forward, until page 102), and a organizational structure that seems to lack both organization and structure. There are three areas from which criticism of Governor Hyde has always stemmed. The most infamous is a portrait said to be of him, dressed in women's attire, now hanging in the halls of the New-York Historical Society, a portrait with which there is no connection to the Governor until many decades after his death. The second, and in many ways weakest, is a series of 5 letters containing rumor-mongering of the Governor's supposed cross-dressing habits. The final, and most serious, is a large group of more or less contemporary charges (primarily propagated by Lewis Morris, the man who was in line to become the royal governor of New Jersey until Hyde's father and uncle interceded) of fiscal misconduct, including accepting of bribes, mismanagement of colonial finances, and living far in excess of his position and means. Bonomi places each of these pieces of evidence into their proper political and social contexts, completely discrediting the portrait's connection to Hyde, and clarifying the difference between the rumors of the day and what actually took place. More importantly, Bonomi explains, to a certain degree, why these rumors were so prevalent, and why so many of the rumors focused on sexual innuendo. One does not need to look farther than the Monica Lewinsky scandal to see the application of Bonomi's findings to our understanding of our own time. A new form of media, greater press freedoms, and a large upheaval in the nature of political institutions and leadership are just three of many parallels between the late 17th/early 18th centuries, and the late 20th/early 21st centuries.
One might desire more from this text, however. The balance between salvaging Hyde's historical legacy and of analyzing the social context that led to the charges against him, is heavily weighted towards the former, with only one chapter dealing with issues of sexual identity and changing morals in this period. Further, Bonomi comes across not so much as a disinterested detective, but rather as defense attorney, committed to proving that Hyde wasn't a bad guy above all else. Her analysis of the letters charging Hyde with cross dressing is primarily devoted to showing why we shouldn't believe them, and little else, and such problems are scattered throughout the book. Additionally, the book lacks something of a cohesive structure, and would do well to have a more solid introduction, any kind of a conclusion, and perhaps a glossary for those readers who aren't as intimately familiar with British political history as the author herself clearly is. Still, Bonomi's book accomplishes much of what it sets out to. It exonerates Hyde, for the most part, returning the charges against him to the context that historians have stripped them from, and increasing our understanding of the political climate of the early 18th century. It is useful for any student of colonial or British politics, and for anyone interested in the forms political discourse takes. Not to mention for all the historians who have taken the charges against the Lord Cornbury at face value and perpetuated some of the most vulgar and base forms of political accusations for their readers, out of self-interest and expediency. Despite it's flaws, this book opens the door to new interpretations of colonial and British politics, and paves the way for a more responsible historical interpretation of the American past. (originally prepared for History H398, Spring 2000, Ohio State University)
Lcena Lcena
The writer does indeed show how easily stories get garbled and tales get passed on as history. A great deal of scepticism or, at least, critical awareness is needed when looking at the past. This is a very readable and lucid book.