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eBook Race And Liberty in the New Nation: Emancipation in Virginia from the Revolution to Nat Turner's Rebellion ePub

eBook Race And Liberty in the New Nation: Emancipation in Virginia from the Revolution to Nat Turner's Rebellion ePub

by Eva Sheppard Wolf

  • ISBN: 0807131946
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Eva Sheppard Wolf
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Louisiana State Univ Pr; First Edition edition (December 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 284
  • ePub book: 1343 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1228 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf mbr doc
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 590

Description

Wolf offers a tremendous service by providing a ground-level view of emancipation in Virginia that walks the reader chronologically through the law and practice of emancipation from 1776 to 1832.

Race and Liberty in the New Nation: Emancipation in Virginia from the Revolution to Nat Turner's Rebellion. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2006. Wolf offers a tremendous service by providing a ground-level view of emancipation in Virginia that walks the reader chronologically through the law and practice of emancipation from 1776 to 1832. Virginia's commitment to slavery was contested repeatedly; but the contest always ended the same way, with the refusal by white Virginians to embrace collectively a racially egalitarian future.

As the American Revolution dawned, Virginia was home not merely to the largest number of African Americans of any new state, but it also boasted a large number of reformers, white and black alike, who desired an end to unfree labor. As the American Revolution dawned, Virginia was home not merely to the largest number of African Americans of any new state, but it also boasted a large number of reformers, white and black alike, who desired an end to unfree labor. Wealthy planter Robert Carter created a schedule by which he freed his slaves, and attorney St. George Tucker published a lengthy plan for gradual emancipation, as did Fernando Fairfax, who combined his scheme with the forced removal of freedpersons.

Start by marking Race and Liberty in the New Nation .

Start by marking Race and Liberty in the New Nation: Emancipation in Virginia from the Revolution to Nat Turner's Rebellion as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. By examining how ordinary Virginia citizens grappled with the vexing problem of slavery in a society dedicated to universal liberty, Eva Sheppard Wolf broadens our understanding of such concepts as freedom, slavery, emancipation, and race in the early years of the American republic. She frames her study around the moment between slavery and liberty—emancipation—shedding new light on the complicated relations between whites and blacks in a slave society. This well-informed and carefully crafted book outlines important and heretofore rarely examined changes in whites' views of blacks and liberty in the new nation

Start by marking Race and Liberty in the New Nation: Emancipation in Virginia from the Revolution to Nat Turner's Rebellion as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. This well-informed and carefully crafted book outlines important and heretofore rarely examined changes in whites' views of blacks and liberty in the new nation. Combining a study of manumission documents with an investigation of the shifting public discussions over slavery, Race and Liberty in the New Nation demonstrates that the high point of antislavery sentiment in Virginia occurred during the 1830s and not the Revolutionary period.

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In her important new book, Race and Liberty in the New Nation, Eva Sheppard Wolf carries this story forward . Wolf is not the first historian to tread this territory.

Wolf is not the first historian to tread this territory. Indeed, there have been several studies of how Virginia's revolutionary generation attempted to reconcile their devotion to universal liberty with their commitment to chattel bondage

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Emancipation in Virginia from the Revolution to Nat Turner's Rebellion. by Eva Sheppard Wolf.

book by Eva Sheppard Wolf. Race and Liberty in the New Nation : Emancipation in Virginia from the Revolution to Nat Turner's Rebellion.

Legacy of Nat Turner’s slave rebellion lingers, but reminders are disappearing. This year, Virginia marks the origins of slavery in the English colonies. The first captured Africans arrived at Virginia’s Point Comfort in August 1619. Instead, lawmakers passed harsher laws that made African Americans’ lives even worse. The debates prompted by Turner’s insurrection were the most public, focused, and sustained discussion of slavery and emancipation that ever occurred i. .southern state, historian Eva Sheppard Wolf wrote. The process laid bare how deeply conflicted white Southerners were about the topic.

Eva Sheppard Wolf, a professor at San Francisco State University, explains in Race and Liberty in the New Nation: Emancipation in Virginia From the Revolution to Nat Turner’s Rebellion

By examining how ordinary Virginia citizens grappled with the vexing problem of slavery in a society dedicated to universal liberty, Eva Sheppard Wolf broadens our understanding of such important concepts as freedom, slavery, emancipation, and race in the early years of the American republic. She frames her study around the moment between slavery and liberty—emancipation—shedding new light on the complicated relations between whites and blacks in a slave society. Wolf argues that during the post-Revolutionary period, white Virginians understood both liberty and slavery to be racial concepts more than political ideas. Through an in-depth analysis of archival records, particularly those dealing with manumission between 1782 and 1806, she reveals how these entrenched beliefs shaped both thought and behavior. In spite of qualms about slavery, white Virginians repeatedly demonstrated their unwillingness to abolish the institution. The manumission law of 1782 eased restrictions on individual emancipation and made possible the liberation of thousands, but Wolf discovers that far fewer slaves were freed in Virginia than previously thought. Those who were emancipated posed a disturbing social, political, and even moral problem in the minds of whites. Where would ex-slaves fit in a society that could not conceive of black liberty? As Wolf points out, even those few white Virginians who proffered emancipation plans always suggested sending freed slaves to some other place. Nat Turner's rebellion in 1831 led to a public debate over ending slavery, after which discussions of emancipation in the Old Dominion largely disappeared as the eastern slaveholding elite tightened its grip on political power in the state. This well-informed and carefully crafted book outlines important and heretofore unexamined changes in whites' views of blacks and liberty in the new nation. By linking the Revolutionary and antebellum eras, it shows how white attitudes hardened during the half-century that followed the declaration that "all men are created equal." AUTHOR BIO: Eva Sheppard Wolf is an assistant professor of history at San Francisco State University.