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eBook Magistrates, Police, and People: Everyday Criminal Justice in Quebec and Lower Canada, 1764-1837 (Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History) ePub

eBook Magistrates, Police, and People: Everyday Criminal Justice in Quebec and Lower Canada, 1764-1837 (Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History) ePub

by Donald Fyson

  • ISBN: 0802092233
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Donald Fyson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 1st edition (December 16, 2006)
  • Pages: 464
  • ePub book: 1254 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1654 kb
  • Other: doc txt docx mobi
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 509

Description

Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History. The state of the privies in the Montreal courthouse epitomized the majesty of criminal justice in Quebec and Lower Canada.

Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History. Published by: University of Toronto Press. The grandiose plan for neo-Palladian public privies, an evident attempt to reinforce the legitimacy of justice through architecture, was never carried out – the cost was prohibitive.

Magistrates, Police, and People book. Magistrates, Police, and People challenges this s The role and function of criminal justice in a conquered colony is always problematic, and the case of Quebec is no exception.

Magistrates, Police, and PeopleThe role and function of criminal justice in a conquered colony is always problematic, and the case of. .Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History. Page Count: 490 pages. Dimensions: . in x . in.

Magistrates, Police, and PeopleThe role and function of criminal justice in a conquered colony is always problematic, and the case of Quebec is no exception.

Donald Fyson's Magistrates, Police, and People: Everyday Criminal Justice in Quebec and Lower Canada, 1764-1837 certainly deserves both the awards and accolades it has recently received.

The role and function of criminal justice in a conquered colony is always problematic, and the case of Quebec is.Magistrates, Police, and People : Everyday Criminal Justice in Quebec and Lower Canada, 1764-1837.

The role and function of criminal justice in a conquered colony is always problematic, and the case of Quebec is no exception.

Volume 26 Issue 3: law, war, and history: a special issue. Donald Fyson, English Français. Rights & Permissions.

2007, Honorable Mention: Donald Fyson, Magistrates, Police, and People. Everyday Criminal Justice in Quebec and Lower Canada, 1764-1837 (University of Toronto Press/The Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History, 2006)

2007, Honorable Mention: Donald Fyson, Magistrates, Police, and People. Everyday Criminal Justice in Quebec and Lower Canada, 1764-1837 (University of Toronto Press/The Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History, 2006). 2011, Honorable Mention: Sean Mills The Empire Within; Postcolonial Thought and Political Activism in Sixties Montreal (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2010).

The role and function of criminal justice in a conquered colony is always problematic, and the case of Quebec is no exception. Many historians have suggested that, between the Conquest and the Rebellions (1760s-1830s), Quebec's 'Canadien' inhabitants both boycotted and were excluded from the British criminal justice system. Magistrates, Police, and People challenges this simplistic view of the relationship between criminal law and Quebec society, offering instead a fresh view of a complex accord.

Based on extensive research in judicial and official sources, Donald Fyson offers the first comprehensive study of the everyday workings of criminal justice in Quebec and Lower Canada. Focussing on the justices of the peace and their police, Fyson examines both the criminal justice system itself, and the system in operation as experienced by those who participated in it. Fyson contends that, although the system was fundamentally biased, its flexibility provided a source of power for ordinary citizens. At the same time, everyday criminal justice offered the colonial state and colonial elites a powerful, though often faulty, means of imposing their will on Quebec society. This fascinating and controversial study will challenge many received historical interpretations, providing new insight into the criminal justice system of early Quebec.