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eBook A Way Through the Wilderness: The Natchez Trace and the Civilization of the Southern Frontier ePub

eBook A Way Through the Wilderness: The Natchez Trace and the Civilization of the Southern Frontier ePub

by William C. Davis

  • ISBN: 0060169214
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: William C. Davis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harpercollins; 1st edition (February 1, 1995)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1601 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1244 kb
  • Other: azw txt mbr lit
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 985

Description

Davis leaves no doubt the Southern Frontier was just as wild as the Wild West. I like the majority of William C. Davis works but this work is not a good effort

Davis leaves no doubt the Southern Frontier was just as wild as the Wild West. BOMC and History Book Club alternates. Davis works but this work is not a good effort. It does not even begin to focus on the Natchez trace, does not adequately describe the impact of the city of Natchez on the early Southern frontier, ignores the separateness that characterized early southwestern America and barely touches on the existence of another road, the Military Road from Charleston to Mobile to New Orleans that had just as much impact on the settlement. and development of this portion of the early southwestern United States.

Davis (Jefferson Davis: The Man and His Hour, LJ 11/15/91) has written another outstanding book about American history. In this fascinating story of the importance of the Natchez Trace for opening a direct road between Nashville and Natchez, Mississippi, Davis takes his readers down many "roads" along the Natchez Trace. He begins with "The Road to Empire," a history of the land and the first explorers. Descriptions of the first trailblazers battling the ever-present poison ivy (without calamine lotion) certainly bring the enormity of their achievement to life.

A Way Through the Wilderness: The Natchez Trace and the Civilization of the Southern Frontier (1995). The Cause Lost: Myths and Realities of the Confederacy (1996) at Google Books. Three Roads to the Alamo: The Lives and Fortunes of David Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis (1998). Lincoln's Men: How President Lincoln Became Father to an Army and a Nation (1999). The Union That Shaped the Confederacy: Robert Toombs and Alexander H. Stephens (2001).

A Way Through the Wilderness book. The danger and adversity faced on the Natchez Trace shaped the communities as much as the education, religion and enlightenment that radiated from it. In A Way Through the Wilderness, William C. Davis uses the everyday experiences and daily struggles travellers and settlers to make a significant contribution to our understanding of the Old South West and those who inhabited i. .Praise for A Way Through the Wilderness. This is lively history, replete with colorful characters.

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I worked on the Natchez Trace for two years and I had a hard time finding . Of those books, most focus on the lurid background of the roadway or on its current scenic beauty.

A Way Through the Wilderness : The Natchez Trace and the Civilization of the Southern Frontier. I worked on the Natchez Trace for two years and I had a hard time finding any scholarly information until I discovered this book. I highly recommend it for anyone interested in the Natchez Trace.

He also illustrates some of the great frontier personalities of the early years of the century.

Chronicling the movement of settlers along the Natchez Trace and development of the old Southwest, a colorful portrait of pioneer life reveals details of daily existence, incredible hardships and dangers, and the struggle to establish social, economic, and political stability. Kullanıcılar ne diyor? - Eleştiri yazın. A WAY THROUGH THE WILDERNESS: The Natchez Trace and the Civilization of the Southern Frontier. Kullanıcı Değerlendirmesi - Kirkus

Examines the social and cultural history of the Alabama/Mississippi frontier using the Natchez Trace Indian trail as the pathway.

Examines the social and cultural history of the Alabama/Mississippi frontier using the Natchez Trace Indian trail as the pathway. Recommended By. Numerous educational institutions recommend us, including Oxford University, Michigan State University, and University of Minnesota.

Examines the social and cultural history of the Alabama/Mississippi frontier using the Natchez Trace Indian trail as the pathway

Comments

Black_Hawk_Down Black_Hawk_Down
William Davis has written a wide ranging account of the development of the South, mainly Mississippi, Alabama from pre colonial time to about the mid 19th century. He covers the early environment and biology, early explorers including the Spanish and French, early settlements, and historical context of religion, community, education, industry, transportation, agriculture, trade, politics and law, Indian affairs, vices, wars and other. He relates the impact of such developments as the stream boat, the cotton gin, cotton crop, and others on the story.

The first part of each chapter gives the historical context, and the latter part of the chapters goes into great detail, many anecdotes. The amount of research the author put into this book is extraordinary: 30 pages of bibliography including newspapers, manuscripts, books, thesis, and 900 references.
Walan Walan
Good history of the Natchez Trace, the country through which it passes and the people who used it as well as those who lived along it or nearby. Mr. Davis usually writes clear, lucid, entertaining popular history but this book is not as organized as others I have read. I have bern rereading it in order to answer the questions asked by our 9 year old as we explore the Trace. My objection to the book is that it would be more helpful for my purposes if the story were told in a more linear fashion, either according to a timeline or geography. This should not be a problem for most casual readers.
Porgisk Porgisk
This was a very interesting book particularly if one has traveled the Trace from Natchez to Nashville. The author did extensive research and provided an enormous bibliography and detailed footnotes at the end of the text. For those who enjoy early American history the book is terrific.
Vudojar Vudojar
This book gives great detail on an important subject of the settlement of the southeast. This much information on this subject is not easy to find. Delivery was perfect. Thanks.
Manesenci Manesenci
great read
Steel balls Steel balls
Having traveled the Natchez a couple of times, this book was interesting I had a feel for what it was talking about. Lots of history and detail of the Trace, its development, its dangers, and its role in development of the West, and use during the Civil War. The book was very long, and after a while I was getting tired of all the detail.
Modred Modred
I like the majority of William C. Davis works but this work is not a good effort. It does not even begin to focus on the Natchez trace, does not adequately describe the impact of the city of Natchez on the early Southern frontier, ignores the separateness that characterized early southwestern America and barely touches on the existence of another road, the Military Road from Charleston to Mobile to New Orleans that had just as much impact on the settlement and development of this portion of the early southwestern United States. Whew, that was a mouthful!

Unfortunately, these are the high points of this book. The book is poorly written, disorganized and follows no chronological sequence. If you are interested in the fascinating history of early Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia, consider The Old Southwest, 1795-1830 by Thomas D. Clark and John D. W. Guice. It appears that many passages of Davis' book are lifted directly from it.
A. Good history book, hard to get in the heart of the book. Would be good for a history class.