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eBook Atlanta and the War ePub

eBook Atlanta and the War ePub

by Webb B. Garrison

  • ISBN: 1558534148
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Webb B. Garrison
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Rutledge Hill Pr; 1st edition (August 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 283
  • ePub book: 1542 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1810 kb
  • Other: doc azw docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 466

Description

Sherman's destruction of Atlanta during the Civil War was not a planned Union strategy, according to Webb Garrison, but the campaign made Atlanta a household name.

Sherman's destruction of Atlanta during the Civil War was not a planned Union strategy, according to Webb Garrison, but the campaign made Atlanta a household name. If the people raise a howl against my barbarity and cruelty,I will answer that war is war and not p. By Thriftbooks. com User, November 2, 2008. An excellent,in depth look at how and why the winning of the battle for Atlanta was so difficult and important. So much written about battles concentrate on statistics,battle plans and other details.

Atlanta and the War book. Sherman's destruction of Atlanta during the Civil War was not a planned Union strategy, according to Webb Garrison, but the campaign made Atlanta a household name and sparked the city's growth toward world-class significance. Illustrated and indexed.

Civil War buffs, be warned: Webb Garrison’s Curiosities of the Civil War may catch you off guard. will deepen your understanding of the war and the people who engaged in it. Packed with obscurities and bizarre anecdotes, it spills over with specifics you’ve likely never heard. This nuanced perspective on the war provides a glimpse beyond the bloody battles, casualties, and political conflict. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Webb Garrison (Author). An interesting read and a nice addition to my library of books on the American Civil War.

History - Civil War, 1861-1865 - Social aspects. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

John Gilleland had an idea he was sure would bring a quick end to the war?a double-barreled cannon.

As a member of the elite Mitchell Thunderbolts, Pvt. John Gilleland had an idea he was sure would bring a quick end to the war?a double-barreled cannon. Legend has it that in its sole test firing, balls whizzed around in erratic fashion and killed three Thunderbolts.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Webb B Garrison books online. The Encyclopedia of Civil War Usage. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 30 of 63 results.

Find nearly any book by Webb B Garrison. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers

Find nearly any book by Webb B Garrison. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Webb B. Garrison, Bill Granstaff. The Civil War is most often described as one in which brother fought against brother. Brady's Civil War. Mathew B. photographer Brady, Webb B. Garrison. An unforgettable collection of hundreds of historic photographs from America's most horrific war. Cite. Why You Say It. Webb B. Amazing women of the Civil War. But the most devastating war fought on American soil was also one in which women demonstrated heroic deeds. More).

Author Webb Garrison has brought together Jackson's story and 150 other instances of friendly fire in this unique book that strips away the romanticism of the Civil War. " night setting in, it was difficult to distinguish friend from foe. Several of our own command were killed by our ow. . Several of our own command were killed by our own friends. Ambrose Wright at Malvern Hill "I thought it better to kill a Union man or two than to lose the effect of my moral suasion. Union Officer Louis M. Goldsborough "Whilst in this position my regiment was shelled by our own artillery

Sherman's destruction of Atlanta during the Civil War was not a planned Union strategy, according to Webb Garrison, but the campaign made Atlanta a household name and sparked the city's growth toward world-class significance. Illustrated and indexed.

Comments

catterpillar catterpillar
An excellent ,in depth look at how and why the winning of the battle for Atlanta was so difficult and important.
So much written about battles concentrate on statistics,battle plans and other details. In this book, you will become intimately knowledgeablewith the personality of the Generals involved,particularly on the local scene but also back at Headquarters and Washington.
The book goes deeply into the motives that influenced the Generals;particularly General Sherman.
The author has given us the benefit of what must have been a tremendous amount of reaearch into all the available records. He even quotes the letters Sherman wrote to his wife throughout the campaign.
Yes;Sherman was a very tough General;but he knew what had to be done to secure victory and he never flinched in completing his mission.
The book abounds in the General's personal thoughts and actual words spoken.The book also abounds in excellent maps,drawings,artwork and photographs .To the astute student of the Civil War;you will find an excellent set of notes referencing virtually everything covered in the book.
I thought I had a reasonable understanding of Sherman's victory in Atlanta; but this book gives a very different slant on this part of the war.It certainly increased my understanding of what went on in the minds of the Generals involved.
The book goes into great detail;but not in a way of being heavy or boring. It is a very easy read and I learned something which had never occurred to me before.Let me quote from page 158;

"Men of both sides generally concurred in their estimates of U.S. Gen.James B. McPherson. At the age of thirty-five and considered handsome,McPherson was one of the ablest and best-liked Civil War generals.He was the only commander of a Union army to die in combat.While the battle of Atlanta raged,his comrades agreed that his loss was irreparable.Years later Grant praised him as having been one of the "ablest,purest and best generals"on either side."
Whether an expert historical student of the Civil War,or someone like me whose favorite movie of all is ,"Gone With The Wind" ;this book will have something for everyone.
Uylo Uylo
This book provides more detail on the march to Atlanta than other histories I have read. It also provides maps of the various battles, as well as some pictures.
The major fault is that the author says there are not remnants of the battle. There are many. The Kennesaw Mountain battlefield is a national park. The Resaca and Dalton battlefields are identified. Picketts Mill battlefield is a park complete with re enactors working there. There are hundreds of signs all over Georgia and especially the Atlanta area identifying battle sites, and units engaged at the sites.
Through other reading, I had developed a negative opinion of Gen Hood. This book shows him not only to be stupid and overly agressive, oblivious of the wasting of men his poor generalship accomplished, but also a backstabber, writing negative comments about Johnston's generalship to Jeff Davis, but also in disobeying orders to fight at the critical battles of Resaca, and Tunnel Hill. He also did not obey Jeff Davis's orders to defend a move by Sherman east to the sea. Having been to the battlefield areas, of Resaca and Tunnel Hill,I wondered how the Union Army could penetrate those impregnable positions. Since Hood did not occupy them it made it easy for the Union.
A very good read for one who wants to know more detail about the battle of Atlanta.
A forced evacuation of the city, documented in few other places, is described.
Malarad Malarad
I found this book on the advancement of General Sherman from Tennesse through the state of Georgia very interesting.
The book has a good supply of pictures from beginning to end. Many books of higher prestige are very sparse with photos, this was not. As with most civil war books there are not many maps of key skirmishes, small battles, or important movements. Its like many authors say to the reader, "go ahead and imagine what is going on here".
It is hard to be a real fan of the way the way that Sherman conducted himself in war, yet he was relentless in his pursuit of The Army of Tenn., battering the city of Atlanta, and paralyzing the railroads in Ga.
I am glad I found this book.
Uscavel Uscavel
After the first review by "A reader from London" and a Sherman apologist, and "One Star", and no review... just diatribe, I will buy this book and see what it says. It must be good.