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eBook Back from the Land: How Young Americans Went to Nature in the 1970s, and Why They Came Back ePub

eBook Back from the Land: How Young Americans Went to Nature in the 1970s, and Why They Came Back ePub

by Eleanor Agnew

  • ISBN: 1566636647
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Eleanor Agnew
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ivan R. Dee (July 21, 2005)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1729 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1393 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi doc mbr
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 873

Description

Back from the Land book.

Back from the Land book. The majority of stories Eleanor Agnew If you were in your late teens or early twenties in the late 1960s or early 1970s, and if you espoused the typical hippie points of view, chances are you at least thought about moving far away from "civilization" and living a simpler, less materialistic life. This is the story of many who did just that, and what happened to them.

details these visionaries and their movement. Provides an excellent survey

details these visionaries and their movement. Provides an excellent survey. If you were in your late teens or early twenties in the late 1960s or early 1970s, and if you espoused the typical hippie points of view, chances are you at least thought about moving far away from "civilization" and living a simpler, less materialistic life. Most were so determined to live off the grid they eschewed indoor plumbing, electricity, and any kind of heat except firewood.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 263-266) and index.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Back from the land : how young Americans went to nature in the 1970s, and why they came back Eleanor Agnew.

When Eleanor Agnew, her husband, and two young children moved to the Maine woods in 1975, the back-to-the-land movement had already attracted untold numbers of converts who had grown increasingly estranged from mainstream American society.

Perhaps unlike any other aspect of the modern American narrative, the dominant interpretations of the counterculture of the late 1960s and 1970s have been flattened into uncomplicated generalizations.

Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 2004. Pp. xi, 274. 11. notes, bi. index. Perhaps unlike any other aspect of the modern American narrative, the dominant interpretations of the counterculture of the late 1960s and 1970s have been flattened into uncomplicated generalizations. Thankfully, a number of writers and scholars have begun to parse out the various waves of protest within the counterculture, distinguishing not only between the various interests and influences affecting the participants, but also the different outcomes of those influences.

Back from the land : how young Americans went to nature in the 1970s, and why they came back. Back from the land : how young Americans went to nature in the 1970s, and why they came back, Eleanor Agnew. Agnew, Eleanor author.

How Young Americans Went to Nature in the 1970s, and Why They Came Back. by Eleanor Agnew Agnew. Published September 25, 2004 by Ivan R. Dee, Publisher.

When Eleanor Agnew, her husband, and two young children moved to the Maine woods in 1975, the back-to-the-land movement had already attracted untold numbers o. .Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Back From the Land - Why did people leave? Economics. Moderator cut: copy write issues. 12-09-2009, 02:18 PM. arctichomesteader.

When Eleanor Agnew, her husband, and two young children moved to the Maine woods in 1975, the back-to-the-land movement had already attracted untold numbers of converts who had grown increasingly estranged from mainstream American society. Visionaries by the millions were moving into woods, mountains, orchards, and farmlands in order to disconnect from the supposedly deleterious influences of modern life. Fed up with capitalism, TV, Washington politics, and 9-to-5 jobs, they took up residence in log cabins, A-frames, tents, old schoolhouses, and run-down farmhouses; grew their own crops; hauled water from wells; avoided doctors in favor of natural cures; and renounced energy-guzzling appliances. This is their story, in all its glories and agonies, its triumphs and disasters (many of them richly amusing), told by a woman who experienced the simple life firsthand but has also read widely and interviewed scores of people who went back to the land. Ms. Agnew tells how they found joy and camaraderie, studied their issues of Mother Earth News, coped with frozen laundry and grinding poverty, and persevered or gave up. Most of them, it turns out, came back from freedom and self-sufficiency, either by returning to urban life or by dressing up their primitive rural existence—but they held onto the values they gained during their back-to-the-land experience. Back from the Land is filled with juicy details and inspired with a naïve idealism, but the attraction of the life it describes is undeniable. Here is a book to delight those who remember how it was, those who still kick themselves for not taking the chance, and those of a new generation who are just now thinking about it.

Comments

Early Waffle Early Waffle
If you were in your late teens or early twenties in the late 1960s or early 1970s, and if you espoused the typical hippie points of view, chances are you at least thought about moving far away from "civilization" and living a simpler, less materialistic life. This is the story of many who did just that, and what happened to them. Most were so determined to live off the grid they eschewed indoor plumbing, electricity, and any kind of heat except firewood. The majority of stories Eleanor Agnew tells involve people who lived on farms or communes in areas like Maine, upstate New York, the mountains of West Virginia, and Michigan. Getting through six months of severe winters under these kinds of conditions was arduous and disheartening. Some people lasted less than a year. The author lasted five years, but the whole "experiment" was her husband's idea, not hers, and there are times in the book where her bitterness about those "wasted" years comes through loud and clear.

The good news is the people who made it through this experience, whether for a short time or for a number of years, generally maintained those same values of simplicity and living close to the earth even when they rejoined the mainstream. Many went back to college and got advanced degrees and either taught the things they believed in or became lawyers or advocates with the goal of helping those in need. Many had very positive memories of their years of living on the land, and it is in reporting those memories that the author's bias is most clearly seen. She seems skeptical that anyone could have positive feelings toward a life that was so deprived of comfort and modern conveniences. For most people it was the friendships and camaraderie that they missed, and some groups who once lived in communes or other types of communal living still get together on a regular basis, or at least have maintained contact.

Reading about all the difficulties people faced during the transition from modern life to basically living like people from two hundred years ago, it is very easy to be scornful of their naivete and lack of knowledge and foresight (as my significant other was). But the idea of voluntary simplicity and minimalism is with us still, just in a different form than it was back in the 1970s.
Flas Flas
This is a great personal history of the "back to the land" movement of the 70s and what happened to the folks who went there. I only wish there were a History Channel video version so I could show it to my younger friends who don't ever seem to have time to read. Some are, unfortunately, considering a similar path with many of the same unrealistic expectations. They call it "sustainability" these days but to far too many that buzzword is nothing more than the same old simplicity-lust that rears its longing head every every now and then in complex cultures. There is surely some path to a less hectic, more meaningful, more holistic life to be had than the conventional materialistic overachiever society we are (once again) ensconced in but my tongue-in-cheek advice to young friends, largely ignored, has been: "The 'simple life' isn't all that simple, the 'natural life' doesn't occur naturally, and the only real way to get 'back to the land' is through a six foot hole in the earth."

The author illustrates through stories about the lives of those who were there just how difficult it was to jump back into a more self-sufficient country life, especially as we had children who needed more social interfaces. Or as we just realized that getting sick, injured, and just plain older and feebler away from the protective elements of mainstream culture wasn't as great as it seemed when we were young, invincible, and blind with our own ideals. Maybe a few young people will actually read this book before taking a similar plunge and be better off for it. Forewarned is forearmed after all. I'd like to hope the new generation will find itself more prepared to create a better life by paying attention to what has gone before and what failed and succeeded.
Kiutondyl Kiutondyl
I enjoyed reading Back from the Land : How Young Americans Went to Nature in the 1970s, and Why They Came Back. It is a quick read, mainly stories of the experiences of the author and her friends who were lured to live "the simple life" "off the grid" in the country. Many references are made to how easy Mother Earth magazine made it seem to drop out; a simile might be drawn that says Mother Earth magazine is to back to the landers as Lansford Hastings' The Emigrants' Guide to Oregon and California was to the Donner Party-both documents were oversimplified and omitted many important details to the sorrow of those that used them as a guide. The book is frequently laugh out loud funny when describing the attempts of city folk to adapt to country life. I especially liked the chapters that outlined how the "back to the landers" dealt with their unexpected poverty. I only wish that experience had given more of them impetus to fight poverty for all rather than just escape it themselves. I wanted the author would have included stories from a broader range of people, and to give communes a separate section in the book rather than combining those experiences with the stories of families who lived independently in the country. Another topic that isn't adequately dealt with is feminism (or lack thereof) amongst the people who chose this lifestyle. The author makes several references to having to do all the traditionally feminine tasks without help from her husband and being bitter about that. Why didn't she ask for help? Was it easier to fall into sex role stereotypes in this situation? I wanted to know more about this topic. The book also wraps up too quickly and doesn't explore why people left the land and how they assimilated back into society in the depth that I wished for. Still, a worthwhile read.
Berkohi Berkohi
An excellent book that brought back many memories of my childhood, the move out into the country, the coyote cries, making butter, and making tallow candles, the smell and warmth of the woodstove. It also provided insights into the hardships my parents faced and the reasons why we didn't stay. It provides valuable lessons for others that might follow in their footsteps.