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eBook The Jacobin Clubs in the French Revolution: The Middle Years ePub

eBook The Jacobin Clubs in the French Revolution: The Middle Years ePub

by Michael L. Kennedy

  • ISBN: 0691055262
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Michael L. Kennedy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (February 21, 1988)
  • Pages: 456
  • ePub book: 1303 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1560 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf txt azw
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 516

Description

Michael Kennedy is Chair of the History Department at Winthrop University. Kennedy has done much to provide new information regarding the inner workings of the Jacobin clubs in the Revolution.

Michael Kennedy is Chair of the History Department at Winthrop University. It focuses on the twenty-eight months from May 1793 to August 1795, a period spanning the Federalist Revolt, the Terror, and the Thermidorian Reaction.

The book covers the years when the politics of the Revolution took a radical turn that led to the split between the Girondins and Montagnards. The book is divided into six parts. The first section charts fluctuations in the activity of the network of 1,500 clubs and analyzes changes in their membership.

In 1982 Princeton University Press published the widely acclaimed first volume of Michael Kennedy's trilogy on the Jacobin movement. When it is completed, this work will be not only the first general history of the provincial Jacobin clubs to appear in half a century but also the most thorough treatment of the subject.

In 1982 Princeton University Press published the widely acclaimed first volume of Michael Kennedy's trilogy on the Jacobin movement

In 1982 Princeton University Press published the widely acclaimed first volume of Michael Kennedy's trilogy on the Jacobin movement.

Kennedy, Michael L. The Jacobin Club of Marseilles, 1790–1794. -. The Jacobin Clubs in the French Revolution: The Middle Years

Kennedy, Michael L. The Jacobin Clubs in the French Revolution: The First Years. The Jacobin Clubs in the French Revolution: The Middle Years. The Jacobin Clubs in the French Revolution, 1793–1795. JACOBIN CLUBS, activist political clubs that appeared in the cities of the United States in the years from 1793 to 1795. The first club began in Paris under the name Club Breton, in October 1789: it met in a Dominican, or Jacobin, convent in the Rue St. Honoré.

Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965.

The Jacobin Clubs in the French Revolution: The Middle Years. The Frozen Revolution: An Essay on Jacobinism. Sociology and Colonialism in the British and French Empires, 1945–1965. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

Kennedy has done much to provide new information regarding the inner workings of the Jacobin clubs in the .

Kennedy has done much to provide new information regarding the inner workings of the Jacobin clubs in the Revolution.

Jacobin Club, the most famous political group of the French Revolution, which became identified .

Jacobin Club, the most famous political group of the French Revolution, which became identified with extreme egalitarianism and violence and which led the Revolutionary government from mid-1793 to mid-1794. The Jacobins originated as the Club Breton at Versailles, where the deputies from Brittany. In July 1791 the Jacobin Club split over a petition calling for the removal of Louis XVI after his unsuccessful attempt to flee France; many of the moderate deputies left to join the rival club of the Feuillants. Maximilien Robespierre was one of the few deputies who remained, and he assumed a position of prominence in the club.

Book Publishing WeChat. Kennedy, M. L. (2000). The Jacobin Clubs in the French Revolution, 1793-1795. New York & Oxford: Berghahn. has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Future Options of the Kurds. 1 Part I: The Current Situation. AUTHORS: Ferdinand Hennerbichler.

A Jacobin was a member of the Jacobin Club, a revolutionary political movement that was the most famous political club during the French Revolution (1789–99)

A Jacobin was a member of the Jacobin Club, a revolutionary political movement that was the most famous political club during the French Revolution (1789–99). The club was so called because of the Dominican convent in Paris in the Rue Saint-Jacques (Latin: Jacobus) where they originally met. Today, the terms Jacobin and Jacobinism are used in a variety of senses.

In 1982 Princeton University Press published the widely acclaimed first volume of Michael Kennedy's trilogy on the Jacobin movement. When it is completed, this work will be not only the first general history of the provincial Jacobin clubs to appear in half a century but also the most thorough treatment of the subject. Volume 2, spanning the period from the opening of the Legislative Assembly on October 1, 1791, to a decisive coup that occurred in Paris on June 2, 1793, is based on archival research in Paris and in nearly seventy French departments, as well as on hundreds of published sources. The book covers the years when the politics of the Revolution took a radical turn that led to the split between the Girondins and Montagnards.

The book is divided into six parts. The first section charts fluctuations in the activity of the network of 1,500 clubs and analyzes changes in their membership. The second focuses on the "subsistances" and monetary crises, and on issues such as land reform and public education; the third, on the great debate over peace or war in the early Legislative Assembly and the contributions of the societies to the war effort after hostilities commenced. In the fourth section the author reviews the newspapers that the clubs read and published and chronicles the growth of anticlericalism. Section five details the rise of opposition to Louis XVI, and the sixth section deals with the Girondin-Montagnard feud. The book concludes with an essay on the sources of club history in the departments, intended to serve as a guide for future researchers.