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eBook Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith ePub

eBook Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith ePub

by Joseph R. Fornieri

  • ISBN: 0875803156
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Joseph R. Fornieri
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Northern Illinois University Press; 1 edition (May 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 218
  • ePub book: 1340 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1185 kb
  • Other: txt lrf lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 412

Description

Joseph R. Fornieri is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rochester Institute of Technology.

Joseph R. He received the 2001–2002 Eisenhart Provost.

Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith book. Fornieri demonstrates the sincerity of Lincoln's belief and reveals the remarkable consistency between his public and private religious views

Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith book. At Gettysburg Lincoln resolved that this nation, under. Fornieri demonstrates the sincerity of Lincoln's belief and reveals the remarkable consistency between his public and private religious views. Though Lincoln's faith deepened during the turbulent war years and after the death of his son, Willie, his articulation of this faith remained consistent throughout much of his life. Convinced that religion was a crucial aspect of life, Lincoln maintained that his own faith guided and shaped his political thought.

Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith. DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2003. This book is a work of political theory rather than of history

Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith. Pp. 209. This book is a work of political theory rather than of history. From Lincoln's life and writing, Fornieri seeks to elucidate a set of doctrines or teachings. Despite the voluminous literature on Lincoln," writes Fornieri, "few works have offered a sustained exploration of the philosophical coherence of his combination of reason and revelation" (34).

Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith. com User, November 10, 2003. But this book is outstanding and unique. Many are either dedicated to the proposition that he was a racist fool or a great Emancipator. Fornieri's Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith is a welcome contribution to the field, as it offers a nuanced, well-reasoned examination of how the Bible influenced Lincoln's political philosophy. Fornieri argues, "Lincoln viewed the politics of the Civil War era in terms of civil theology" (p. 3). Also known as "civil religion," "political creed," "political theology," "political religion," "moral consensus," and "public philosophy," civil theology is the "all-encompassing moral vision of public.

Book DescriptionAt Gettysburg Lincoln resolved that "this nation, under God," would not perish, and in his Second Inaugural he called for "firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the .

Book DescriptionAt Gettysburg Lincoln resolved that "this nation, under God," would not perish, and in his Second Inaugural he called for "firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right. Fornieri is a professor of political science at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the director of. . Fornieri is a professor of political science at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the director of the Centre for Statesmanship, Law, and Liberty. Fornieri (born June 27, 1965) is an American political historian and Professor of Political Science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is an expert on the political ideology of Abraham Lincoln. Dr. Fornieri is a political philosopher and expert on the political thought and statesmanship of Abraham Lincoln by day, but a blues/classic rock musician by night.

With an introduction by Kenneth L. Deutsch and Joseph R. Fornieri, Lincoln's American Dream will be of enduring interest to scholars, students, teachers, and Lincoln aficionados alike and will attract interest in the fields of American history, leadership, religion and culture, American studies, and African-American studies. 2003, Northern Illinois University Press.

At Gettysburg Lincoln resolved that "this nation, under God," would not perish, and in his Second Inaugural he called for "firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right." How are we to understand these and other invocations of divine authority in the speeches and writings of America's most admired president? Exploring Lincoln's unique blending of religion and politics, Fornieri shows that Lincoln presented a comprehensive and compelling interpretation of political order founded upon American democratic and religious traditions.

Proslavery theologians based their claims to legitimacy on Scripture, but Lincoln denounced this position as incompatible with true religion, reason, and republicanism. He envisioned instead a united nation that would honor both God and American political principles. Fornieri casts Lincoln's unique combination of politics and piety as "biblical republicanism"—a merging of Judeo-Christian beliefs and the founders' tradition of self-government. In a time of unprecedented crisis and upheaval, biblical republicanism provided Lincoln with a moral justification for difficult political choices.

Fornieri demonstrates the sincerity of Lincoln's belief and reveals the remarkable consistency between his public and private religious views. Though Lincoln's faith deepened during the turbulent war years and after the death of his son, Willie, his articulation of this faith remained consistent throughout much of his life. Convinced that religion was a crucial aspect of life, Lincoln maintained that his own faith guided and shaped his political thought.

In contrast to scholars who have emphasized the Lyceum Address as the key to understanding Lincoln's religion and politics, Fornieri brings forth the Peoria Address of 1854 as a more profound and mature reflection of Lincoln's political faith. At Peoria, Lincoln invoked the Declaration of Independence as the nation's moral covenant, characterizing the struggle over extending slavery as a clash between rival political faiths. He emphasized that the Union was worthy of preservation in light of the Declaration's principles of liberty and equality, and that these principles were best secured under the auspices of national Union committed to the Constitution. Abraham Lincoln's Political Faith sheds new light on how the Great Emancipator's personal trust in a living God shaped his vision for a new America.

Comments

Burisi Burisi
This well-researched and carefully written book is judicious in its approach to Lincoln's thought and insightful in its analysis. Indeed, its author is remarkably--and reliably--conversant with a variety of related disciplines, including theology, political theory, philosophy, and history. The result is one of the best books--of an unusually good crop--that have appeared on Lincoln in the past ten years. I hope that Fornieri's excellent work gains a wide audience, because its sound arguments and clear presentation richly deserve consideration alongside the deservedly well-recognized treatments of Allen Guelzo, William Lee Miller, Ronald White, Mark Noll, Richard Carwardine, and others who have written on Lincoln's faith and politics.
We will never grow tired of exploring Lincoln's thought. Why? Because it was so profound for his own time and remains so illuminating for our own.
Cordann Cordann
Dr. Fornieri's book is a thoroughly-researched, highly-interesting work, discussing how Abraham Lincoln's actions during his Presidency during the Civil War resulted from his combining a sincere Bible-based religious faith with (his interpretation of) the vision of the American Founders, particularly Jefferson.
Critics of Lincoln's policies (both those of his time and modern ones) have attributed his strengthening of the federal government, his use of Biblical references in speeches and letters, and his Emancipation Proclamation, to cynical reasons (including messianic ambitions on Lincoln's part). Fornieri addresses and convincingly refutes these arguments, using voluminous quotes from throughout Lincoln's life. The author effectively counters the argument that Lincoln's use of Scripture in speeches and letters was merely an affectation for political convenience or just the common mode of speech at the time. Fornieri shows, through the use of Lincoln's letters and speeches (pre-Presidential and later), that Lincoln's religious faith -although non-sectarian- was sincere and heartfelt. The author also defends Lincoln's actions during the war, including the Emancipation Proclamation, as wholly consistent with his long-standing personal and political beliefs, as well as with the intent of men like Jefferson.
One of the most interesting sections in the book, in my opinion, is the analysis of the theological/Scriptural arguments used by proslavery clergy to not only defend slavery, but to attack antislavery efforts as heretical and "against God's will". Fornieri takes this topic, which is seldom-discussed (particularly by modern-day Confederacy apologists) and shows how Lincoln elegantly and effectively countered the alleged Scriptural defenses for slavery.
The book, being a work of academic research, is not an easy or casual read by any means, but it is well-written and well-researched, and is accessible and compelling enough to hold the interest of those interested in learning more about Lincoln's personal and political philosophies as well as the use and misuse of Scripture during Lincoln's time.
Winn Winn
Rarely does a scholoraly book come to market that appeals greatly to me. Especially so in the vast collection of Lincoln books that are so readily available. Many are either dedicated to the proposition that he was a racist fool or a great Emancipator. But this book is outstanding and unique. Carefully argued, Dr. Fornieri illustrates superbly Lincoln's biblical faith and how he mastered using it without sounding like a zealot. Lincoln's masterery of the English language is unparallled and this book shows with solid research this fact. In addition, the book provides a fascinating critique of the southern politic and clergy who argued that slavery was biblically ordained. How Lincoln deftly argued on the contrary is an American miracle and Dr. Fornieri has illuminated this fact expertly. Read this book slowly, because it is worth digesting. Lincoln always wrote for the ear, not the eye so he urged those who read his letters to read them slowly out loud. Try doing this with this book and it will hit home. Outstanding book on our best president - the 16th one. There are never too many good books on any topic and Lincoln remains a great source for the able scholar and history lover.