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eBook Walking Home: A Traveler in the Alaskan Wilderness, a Journey into the Human Heart ePub

eBook Walking Home: A Traveler in the Alaskan Wilderness, a Journey into the Human Heart ePub

by Lynn Schooler

  • ISBN: 1608194647
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Lynn Schooler
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; Reprint edition (May 10, 2011)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1795 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1322 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf doc lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 607

Description

WALKING HOME A JOURNEY IN THE ALASKAN WILDERNESS LYNN SCHOOLER Dedicated to the memory of. .

WALKING HOME A JOURNEY IN THE ALASKAN WILDERNESS LYNN SCHOOLER Dedicated to the memory of Luisa Stoughton Contents Cover Title Dedication Map Prologue. It was only by the slimmest chance that I had escaped, and given that I was alone in the middle of more than 2,000 square miles of wilderness, with the tenacious bear still somewhere behind me and a flooding river in front of me, my survival did not seem guaranteed. There was no way the small inflatable kayak I was carrying to ford creeks and tidal sloughs during my trek along the coast was adequate to cross the frothing river.

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Lynn Schooler had recently lost a dear friend and was feeling his marriage slipping away from him when he set out on a daring journeyfirst by boat, then on footinto the Alaskan wilderness to clear his head. But the formidable, lonely landscape is also rich with human storiesof trappers, explorers, marooned sailors, and hermits, as well as the myths.

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Seeking solace and escape in nature, he sets out on a solo journey into the Alaskan wilderness, traveling first by small boat across the formidable Gulf of Alaska, then on foot along one of the wildest coastlines in North America. Walking Home is filled with stunning observations of the natural world, and rife with nail-biting adventure as Schooler fords swollen rivers and eludes aggressive grizzlies. But more important, it is a story about finding wholeness-and a sense of humanity-in the wild.

In the spring of 2007, hard on the heels of the worst winter in the history of Juneau, Alaska, Lynn Schooler finds himself facing the far side of middle age and exhausted by laboring to handcraft a home as his marriage slips away. Seeking solace and esca. In the spring of 2007, hard on the heels of the worst winter in the history of Juneau, Alaska, Lynn Schooler finds himself facing the far side of middle age and exhausted by laboring to handcraft a home as his marriage slips away.

Lynn Schooler is the critically acclaimed author of The Blue Bear and The Last Shot. He has lived in Alaska for almost forty years, working as a commercial fisherman, shipwright, wilderness guide, and an award-winning wildlife photographer.

Walking Home: A Journey in the Alaskan Wilderness. Walking home is the second of Lynn's books that I have read. I first was introduced to this talented author when I found "The Blue Bear" in a used book store. Only Kayak: A Journey Into The Heart Of Alaska. It was a treasure hidden among cookbooks and a few of the Twilight novels. From the first pages I was hooked. There is something about his writing that makes me hungry for each line. I find myself reading a sentence and becoming lost in the imagery, the emotion, the honesty.

Lynn Schooler had recently lost a dear friend and was feeling his marriage slipping away from him when he set out on a daring journey-first by boat, then on foot-into the Alaskan wilderness to clear his head.

Lynn Schooler had recently lost a dear friend and was feeling his marriage slipping away from him when he set out on a daring journey-first by boat, then on foot-into the Alaskan wilderness to clear his head. His solo expedition, recounted in Walking Home, is filled with the awe and danger of being on one's own in the wild, being battered by the elements and even, for two harrowing days, becoming the terrified quarry of a grizzly bear.

But the formidable, lonely landscape is also rich with human stories-of trappers, explorers, marooned sailors, and hermits, as well as the myths of the region's Tlingit Indians. Relating his journey, Schooler creates a conversation between the human and the natural, the past and the present, to investigate-on a remote and uninhabited shore-what it means to be not only part of nature's wild web, but also a member of a human community in the flow of history.

Lynn Schooler is the critically acclaimed author of The Blue Bear and The Last Shot. He has lived in Alaska for almost forty years, working as a commercial fisherman, shipwright, wilderness guide, and award-winning wildlife photographer.

Comments

Quttaro Quttaro
The book is described as a journey into the human heart, that it certainly is and surprisingly, a man's heart. I usually prefer intrepid adventure stories by women authors because women describe how they feel, their fears and joys, whereas men tend to to be more into describing their macho achievements in dangerous situations.

Lynn Schooler lays bare his soul to the reader. He hopes the trip by himself into the wilderness will enable him to think about the priorities of life and his future. There are agonizing flashbacks of the incidents in his life which have precipitated this trip. His constant indecision about whether to go on or turn back and go home to his wife.
I resisted, with great effort, going to the end of the book to find out what happened because I was on this journey with him now.

These soul searchings are intermingled with the realities of being alone in a dangerous place. He goes over and over the things to take with him to cater for every eventuality. His worry about how to leave his boat safely in Lituya Bay because the boat is his lifeline. It is all so beautifully and poignantly described that I felt for him all the way. It is a memorable book.
Reddefender Reddefender
amazing book. exceptionally well written. perhaps reveals more about myself than Mr. Schooler, but I loved that a prototypical Alaskan everyman -- builder, guide, fisher -- could and did write such a compelling and sensitive account of his journey. it's true, he doesn't start the walk until late. but just getting to the start of his walk is worth the read. i love his interweave with natural history. like many other reviewers, i was expecting more pure adventure. but this was even better. for all you manly men out there: This is the guy that at least this woman wants.
Moswyn Moswyn
I actually have not finished reading this book though I have two copies (one purchased at Costco that I forgot I had--no matter, it will go to Wisconsin friend). I have read about the bear encounter(s?), and a more hair raising episode plus one very well written I haven't seen. My immediate interest in the book was sparked by a review and excerpt in the Anchorage Daily news which
detailed the finding of a 500 year old body of a young native man by some glacier travelers in the late '90's. The analysis of the remains and remnants of clothing, contents of pockets (pollen grains, etc.) and speculation of why anyone would be at that place at the season surmised (fall) with meager supplies/clothing is like reading a detective episode. The author speculates why this might be--drawing from his own young motivations.
I am eager to read more of the Russian history of the region
which is interwoven with the author's travels.
Gaua Gaua
Walking home is the second of Lynn's books that I have read. I first was introduced to this talented author when I found "The Blue Bear" in a used book store. It was a treasure hidden among cookbooks and a few of the Twilight novels. From the first pages I was hooked. There is something about his writing that makes me hungry for each line. I find myself reading a sentence and becoming lost in the imagery, the emotion, the honesty. He understands the history, wildlife, lands and sea of Alaska. I realized after reading "Walking Home" that he would be the best guide in the world should I have the wherewithall, time and money to travel around Alaska. From the beginning of this book I was enthralled with his encounter with the bear, his short, sweet, but dying marriage in spite of his desire to make it work, his knowledge of the geologic wonders of the Alaskan terrain, and his intense connection to the land. He seems to the kind of man you would want at your side should you go on an adventure. Short of that the book will have to do. I read this book in three sittings. I had to know if he could cross the river, escape the bear, and if his marriage would survive. In the end he answers all my questions but leaves me wanting more. Next book...The Last Shot by Lynn Schooler.
Cala Cala
Great story. Sometimes you just need to get away and think, so life's perspective will return to you. That's what happened to the author in this story. He throws in a lot of Alaskan history, but it was interesting (not boring history).
Doukasa Doukasa
This book is a wonderful combination of history, anthropology, ecology and personal narrative. The author, an experienced outdoors man, sets out on a solo hike into the wilderness to deal with the issues of the lost of a friend, a troubled marriage, and advancing age.
He provides an in depth description of the area he visits as well as the activities of his trek. A series of events changes this from a meditative hike to a fight for survival, where he must reach for the resources to escape. Mr. Schooler is definitely the kind of man that you would want as a companion in a bad situation. I plan to reread this book, and I have purchased his other. I wish that I had found him sooner.
Galubel Galubel
Based on some of the reviews I read before I purchased it, I was expecting this grand soul inspiring deep adventure story, but in my opinion that wasn't the case. Im constantly reading more dramatic and harrowing adventures in outdoor magazines, and I guess that's what I was looking for. The book is very well written though and never bogs down. Its a real easy read. The author is talented and keeps the reader interested by adding bits of the areas rich history to his own little adventure and life backstory. All in all im glad I read it for the bits of history but its not worth a reread for me.
I'm in the camp that there was far too little about the "walk" and too much detail about wood grains, early people exploring the coast, ship wrecks, birds, bird eyes compared to human eyes, etc. Schooler's description of his terror when stalked by a preditor bear was excellent, but it was too long in coming.