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eBook Border Citizens: The Making of Indians, Mexicans, and Anglos in Arizona ePub

eBook Border Citizens: The Making of Indians, Mexicans, and Anglos in Arizona ePub

by Eric V. Meeks

  • ISBN: 0292716990
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Eric V. Meeks
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press; First Edition edition (October 15, 2007)
  • Pages: 342
  • ePub book: 1684 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1270 kb
  • Other: rtf mobi lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 338

Description

South-central Arizona is home to many ethnic groups, including Mexican Americans, Mexican immigrants, and semi-Hispanicized indigenous groups such as Yaquis and Tohono O'odham.

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Eric V. Meeks examines how ethno-racial categories and identities such as Indian, Mexican, and Anglo crystallized in. .

South-central Arizona is home to many ethnic groups, including Mexican Americans, Mexican immigrants, and semi-Hispanicized indigenous groups such as Yaquis and Tohono O'odham.

Journal of Arizona History).

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Runner-up, National Council on Public History Book Award, 2008Southwest Book Award, Border Regional Library Association, 2008

Borders cut through not just places but also relationships, politics, economics, and cultures. Eric V. Meeks examines how ethno-racial categories and identities such as Indian, Mexican, and Anglo crystallized in Arizona's borderlands between 1880 and 1980. South-central Arizona is home to many ethnic groups, including Mexican Americans, Mexican immigrants, and semi-Hispanicized indigenous groups such as Yaquis and Tohono O'odham. Kinship and cultural ties between these diverse groups were altered and ethnic boundaries were deepened by the influx of Euro-Americans, the development of an industrial economy, and incorporation into the U.S. nation-state.

Old ethnic and interethnic ties changed and became more difficult to sustain when Euro-Americans arrived in the region and imposed ideologies and government policies that constructed starker racial boundaries. As Arizona began to take its place in the national economy of the United States, primarily through mining and industrial agriculture, ethnic Mexican and Native American communities struggled to define their own identities. They sometimes stressed their status as the region's original inhabitants, sometimes as workers, sometimes as U.S. citizens, and sometimes as members of their own separate nations. In the process, they often challenged the racial order imposed on them by the dominant class.

Appealing to broad audiences, this book links the construction of racial categories and ethnic identities to the larger process of nation-state building along the U.S.-Mexico border, and illustrates how ethnicity can both bring people together and drive them apart.

Comments

Xcorn Xcorn
I'm doing research for my family and this book really hits the right cord. How it depicts events from the 30', 40' and so on when my Mom and Dad were struggling to make it for our family. I come into the picture in the 40's picking cotton around Florence as a kid. Some information I find is ,at least in my case, incorrect. We got paid 3cents a lb for cotton and I, we, could pick over 300lbs per day and that was not bad money then. Also it states the cotton season started in Oct. For us it started in mid August till Dec 31st. Nevertheless, it is a interesting book and made me aware of alot of back ground I was never aware of. It's well written, lots of research, and interesting.
Goldfury Goldfury
got for a class, passed the class