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eBook Chief Daniel Bread and the Oneida Nation of Indians of Wisconsin (The Civilization of the American Indian Series) ePub

eBook Chief Daniel Bread and the Oneida Nation of Indians of Wisconsin (The Civilization of the American Indian Series) ePub

by L. Gordon McLester III,Laurence M. Hauptman

  • ISBN: 0806134127
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: L. Gordon McLester III,Laurence M. Hauptman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press (September 9, 2002)
  • Pages: 236
  • ePub book: 1865 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1937 kb
  • Other: mbr txt docx doc
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 394

Description

Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians? presence in Wisconsin after their removal from New York, yet no monument commemorates his deeds as the community?s founder.

Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians? presence in Wisconsin after their removal from New York, yet no monument commemorates his deeds as the community?s founder. Laurence M. Hauptman and L. Gordon McLester, III, redress that historical oversight, connecting Bread?s life story with the nineteenth-century history of the Oneida Nation.

Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians’ presence in Wisconsin after their removal from New .

Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians’ presence in Wisconsin after their removal from New York, yet no monument commemorates his deeds as the community’s founder. Gordon McLester, III, redress that historical oversight, connecting Bread’s life story with the nineteenth-century history of the Oneida Nation.

Laurence M. Gordon McLester, III, redress that historical oversight, connecting Bread’s life story with the nineteenth-century history of the Oneida N Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians’ presence in Wisconsin after. Gordon McLester, III, redress that historical oversight, connecting Bread’s life story with the nineteenth-century history of the Oneida N Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians’ presence in Wisconsin after their removal from New York, yet no monument commemorates his deeds as the community’s founder. Gordon McLester, III, redress that historical oversight, connecting Bread’s life story with the nineteenth-century history of the Oneida Nation

Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians’ presence in Wisconsin .

Daniel Bread, Chief of the Oneida, 1831 . Personal details In 1831, Bread and other Indians travelled to Washington to challenge reductions in Oneida lands brought by the 1827 Treaty of Butte Morts and the 1831 Treaty of Washington. There they met with Secretary of War Lewis Cass, former governor of Michigan Territory. Along with George B. Porter, governor of Michigan Territory, they met with President Andrew Jackson at the White.

The Oneida Indians, already weakened by their participation in the Civil War, faced the possibility of losing their reservation-their .

The Oneida Indians, already weakened by their participation in the Civil War, faced the possibility of losing their reservation-their community’s greatest crisis since its resettlement in Wisconsin after the War of 1812.

by Laurence M. Gordon McLester. ISBN of the winning item: 0-8061-3412-7. What type of media is this winner?: Book. Winner Detail Create Date

by Laurence M. Title of a book, article or other published item (this will display to the public): Chief Daniel Bread and the Oneida Nation of Indians of Wisconsin. Winner Detail Create Date

Chief Daniel Bread (1800-1873) played a key role in establishing the Oneida Indians’ presence in Wisconsin after their removal from New York, yet no monument commemorates his deeds as the community’s founder. Laurence M. Hauptman and L. Gordon McLester, III, redress that historical oversight, connecting Bread’s life story with the nineteenth-century history of the Oneida Nation.

Bread was often criticized for his support of acculturation and missionary schools as well as for his working relationship with Indian agents; however, when the Federal-Menominee treaties slashed Oneida lands, he fought back, taking his people’s cause to Washington and confronting President Andrew Jackson. The authors challenge the long-held views about Eleazer Williams’s leadership of the Oneidas and persuasively show that Bread’s was the voice vigorously defending tribal interests.