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eBook The Last Days: A Son's Story Of Sin And Segregation At The Dawn Of A New South ePub

eBook The Last Days: A Son's Story Of Sin And Segregation At The Dawn Of A New South ePub

by Charles Marsh

  • ISBN: 0465044182
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Charles Marsh
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (February 5, 2001)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1346 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1983 kb
  • Other: azw rtf txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 950

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Seeking to come to terms with the haunting memories of his childhood. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Last Days: A Son's Story Of Sin And Segregation At The Dawn Of A New South as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Marsh, Charles, 1958-. New York, NY : Basic Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Charles Marsh talked about his experiences growing up in the American . Charles Marsh is the author of The Last Days: A Son’s Story of Sin and Segregation at the Dawn of a New South, published by Basic Books.

Charles Marsh talked about his experiences growing up in the American South. He was a child and adolescent in the Deep South during the late 1960s and early 70s. In 1967 the author’s father was the minister of the First Baptist Church in Laurel, Mississippi. Mr. Marsh describes the role his father played in opposing the program of the KKK in their community. Charles Marsh talked about his experiences growing up in the American South.

The Last Days is something entirely different in the literature of the civil rights movement of the 1960s. This uncompromising, heartbreaking memoir shows how people struggled with the actual processes of integration. Seeking to come to terms with the haunting memories of his childhood and adolescence in the Deep South, Charles Marsh has crafted a gripping story of small-town Southern life caught up in the whirlwind of the civil rights movement and its fallout.

Books by Charles Marsh include Reclaiming Dietrich Bonhoeffer: The Promise of His Theology (1994); God’s Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights (1997); The Last Days: A Son’s Story of Sin and Segregation.

Books by Charles Marsh include Reclaiming Dietrich Bonhoeffer: The Promise of His Theology (1994); God’s Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights (1997); The Last Days: A Son’s Story of Sin and Segregation at the Dawn of a New South (2001); The Beloved Community: How Faith Shapes Social Justice, from the Civil Rights Movement.

The Last Days: A Son's Story of Sin and Segregation at the Dawn of a New South (New York: Basic Books, 2000). New York Times (November 6, 2006). Samuel Bowers, 82, Klan Leader Convicted in Fatal Bombing, Dies". Cite news requires newspaper (help). Shurter, Edwin Du Bois, ed. (1908). Oratory of the South: from the civil war to the present time. Vollers, Maryanne (1995).

The Last Days: A Son's Story Of Sin And Segregation At The Dawn Of A New South. Coauthors & Alternates. ISBN 9780465044184 (978-0-465-04418-4) Hardcover, Basic Books, 2001. Find signed collectible books: 'The Last Days: A Son's Story Of Sin And Segregation At The Dawn Of A New South'.

The author describes the purchase of two samples of anonymized records from the 1991 United Kingdom census and the creation of a center at the University of Manchester to act both as distributor o. More). The Last Days: A Son's Story Of Sin And Segregation At The Dawn Of A New South. This uncompromising, heartbreaking memoir explores how good Christian folk acquiesced to the terror of the KKK and how the author's father, a prominent Baptist minister, eventually found the courag.

At the same time, The Last Days examines the collision of worlds once divided-white Protestant conservatism, the African American struggle for civil rights, and late 1960s counter culture-that propelled the dramatic changes in everyday life in a small Southern town.

In a comprehensive new biography, scholar Charles Marsh reconstructs .

Marsh is a professor of religious studies and director of the Project of Lived Theology at the University of Virginia. He is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School and the University of Virginia. He is author of seven previous books, including God’s Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights, which won the 1998 Grawemeyer Award in Religion, and a memoir, The Last Days: A Son’s Story of Sin and Segregation at the Dawn of a New South.

Seeking to come to terms with the haunting memories of his childhood in the deep South-Charles Marsh has crafted a memoir of small-town Southern life caught up in the whirlwind of the Civil Rights movement. As minister of the First Baptist Church in Laurel, Mississippi, Charles Marsh's father Bob Marsh, was a prominent man who was beloved by the community. But Laurel was also home to Sam Bowers, the Imperial Wizard of the White Knights of the Mississippi KKK and the director of their daily, unchallenged installments of terror and misery. Bowers was known and tolerated by the entire white community of Laurel. This included Bob Marsh, who struggled to do the right thing while reeling between righteous indignation and moral torpor, only slowly awakening to fear, suffering, and guilt over his unwillingness to take a public stand against Bowers. At the same time, The Last Days examines the collision of worlds once divided-white Protestant conservatism, the African American struggle for civil rights, and late 1960s counter culture-that propelled the dramatic changes in everyday life in a small Southern town.

Comments

Bodwyn Bodwyn
This is a well-written and readable memoir about an important period in the history of this part of Mississippi. I was a teenager in Laurel and Jones County during the period covered by this book (1967-1971), being a few years ahead of the author in the Laurel city school system during this time (Jones Jr. High and Watkins High). I knew of and experienced many of the same things described here, and the most interesting aspect of this book was reading about how the author experienced the same events, what he thought about them, and how they affected the views of him, his family, and his friends and acquaintances. There was a lot of racism among the people of the region during this time. This fact does become apparent when one reads the book, and I remember one or two Amazon reviews (since removed) that complained about it. However, based on what I knew and experienced, he’s right, and I commend him for not glossing over or trying to hide this important aspect of the story.
Kamick Kamick
Marsh grew up in Mississippi during the 1960s, the only child in a family who were neither racist nor vocal civil rights advocates. Theirs is a story rarely heard because it is not one of dramatic heroism or tragedy. Yet it's the real-life story of many of us who grew up in the deep south during that era.
Marsh has a gift for remembering the humorous detail. His story-telling skills are sharp and biting. We can see Laurel, Miss., close-up through a child's eyes. Yet those things we see are presented with the clarity gained from decades of maturity and reflexion.
I know a couple of people who are contemporaries of the author, who grew up in his hometown and church. After I told them how much I enjoyed the book and how the book makes Laurel seem like a nice place, they seemed dumbfounded. They said that folks in Laurel were upset with how the town is presented. I can understand why they might be upset by some of the events and people Marsh recalls, but I never perceived any hostility the author has towards Laurel. Rather, the majority of people and the town itself serve as a pleasant balance to the few evil people and events which take place.
Not quite told with the wit and timing of a Ferrol Sams fictionalized memoir (Run With the Horsemen, for example), The Last Days still mines an earlier South (although Sams' era is the 30s-40s) and discovers treasures in the most humble of places: the home, the school, the church, the playing field. Another book that comes to mind is Homer Hickam's Rocket Boys (October Sky) with its deep yet subtle insight into the relationship (good and bad) of father and son.
misery misery
This is an important book. Informed me about an era in a corner of the country I was not familar with. Great example of moral ambiguity, how difficult it is to shed middle class standards to do what is right.
Sironynyr Sironynyr
Very well written description of a pastor's personal conflict with Biblical truth and cultural mores in Mississippi during the '60's. Personal acquaintance with the author's father, who was the subject of the book, made the reading more interesting. It brought back pleasant memories of my early teen years under that pastor's influence.
Umge Umge
i grew up in the MS delta and this was a great book for me to read in order to see what things used to be like. The past culture has so much effect on the present culture and this was a good book to begin that process of looking in depth at what the south used to be like.
Goltigor Goltigor
Marsh's personal, authentic and insightful memoir gives us a glimpse both into the turbulent civil rights years and a boy's personal struggle with the difficult parts of his Baptist upbringing. It took a while to get flowing, but Marsh's father's battles with the KKK and Marsh's own struggles with his church's definition of sin and its latent racism make for a "can't-put-it-down-yet" read. I especially enjoyed the chapter where Marsh's father agrees to preach to a "Jesus freak" convention in California and comes away refreshed and renewed, with a sense of what the whole Christian mission is really about. Marsh vividly illustrates what was wrong with Christianity of the past and how we can claim an authentic and radical Christianity to make the world of the future a better place for everyone to live.
Brannylv Brannylv
Last Days, by Charles Marsh, is a memoir about the author's boyhood days in Laurel, Mississippi in the late 1960's. The author's description of his own emotional life during this period is moving-- often endearing, sometimes funny, and occassionally painful. What makes this memoir exceptional is the skill with which Dr. Marsh artfully weaves his feelings into the landscape of his own religious life and the community's distress in the midst of the Civil Rights movement. We are guided through the horrifying crimes of the KKK and the trials that followed (Imperial Wizard Sam Bowers is from Laurel and this makes the setting all the more salient), as well as the beginnings of desegregation in the schools-- more than a decade after Brown vs. the Board of Education. All this (and more) is placed in the context of the younger Marsh's relationship with his father, a charismatic and successful Baptist minister. The book gives the sense that the author is using it as a mechanism to come to terms with his father's role as a community leader during this particularly ugly period in American history. By the end, his father is clearly on the side of good, and the author closes by leaving the impression that he, a youngster in his camp bunk, had come to a peaceful resolution. My sense, however, was that if he indeed had found such peace, he would never have been compelled to write such a powerful memoir. The book is nothing short of absorbing. I found it difficult to put down. My only complaint is that at times the author refers to people and events I'd never heard of, though I was able to follow the storyline without actually going to look any of them up. I am pleased to say that I did get all of the references to The Beverly Hillbillies. Last Days is a short book with a number of complex agendas, both personal and historical. It was an ambitious task for a writer to take on, and Charles Marsh does a laudable job in meeting this challenge.