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eBook Caesar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century ePub

eBook Caesar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century ePub

by Ignatius Donnelly

  • ISBN: 1452805245
  • Category: Ancient Civilizations
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Ignatius Donnelly
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 21, 2010)
  • Pages: 298
  • ePub book: 1422 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1543 kb
  • Other: azw mbr docx lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 608

Description

Home Ignatius Donnelly Cæsar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century. Redactor's note: In this one of his last books Donnelly presageslater futurist works such as "Brave New World" and "1984". Theoriginal scans and OCR were provided by Mr.

Home Ignatius Donnelly Cæsar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century. Cjsars column a story . .Cæsar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century, .

Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831-1901; Rideout, Walter B. (Walter Bates). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Библиографические данные. Caesar's column: a story of the twentieth century Communal Societies in America Extra Series, Viking Society.

Caesar's Column book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Caesar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Caesar's Column: A Story. has been added to your Cart. He has come to the . to bypass the global Wool Ring which has monopolized the commodity, and most of the book is in the form of letters which Gabriel is writing to his brother Heinrich. In the city, Gabriel intervenes to save a beggar, who turns out to be Maximilian Petion, an attorney who is part of a brotherhood (the Brotherhood of Destruction) that is working to overthrow the corrupt ruling class. Much of the story deals with Donnelly's views on society and politics and in particular on the concept of social Darwinism.

The great metropolis dazzles with its futuristic technology, but its ostentatious wealth and luxury mask the brutal repression of the laboring classes by their rich bosses. Its author, Ignatius Donnelly, was the most famous-and an populist politician of the day, and his book became a huge bestseller and was often compared to such utopian works as Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward (1888) and William Morris's News from Nowhere (1890).

Caesar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century is a novel by Ignatius Donnelly, famous as the author of Atlantis: The Antediluvian World. Caesar's Column was published pseudonymously in 1890. The book has been variously categorized as science fiction, speculative fiction, dystopian fiction, and/or apocalyptic fiction; one critic has termed it an "Apocalyptic Utopia.

Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader. Cæsar's Column : a Story of the Twentieth Century. Donnelly, Ignatius, 1831-1901.

Caesar's Column was published pseudonymously in 1890. Books related to Cæsar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century. The book has been variously categorised as science fiction, speculative fiction, dystopian fiction, and/or apocalyptic fiction; one critic has termed it an "Apocalyptic Utopia. Its sales eventually comprised 250,000 copies

Caesar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century is a novel by Ignatius Donnelly, famous as the author of Atlantis: The Antediluvian World. Its sales eventually comprised 250,000 copies. Donnelly's novel was one element of the great wave of utopian and dystopian literature during the later nineteenth century and the early twentieth, exemplified by works like Edward Bellamy's Looking Backward and Jack London's The Iron Heel.

Caesar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century, written by legendary author Ignatius Donnelly is widely considered to be one of the greatest classic and historical texts of all time. This great classic will surely attract a whole new generation of readers. For many, Caesar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century is required reading for various courses and curriculums. And for others who simply enjoy reading timeless pieces of classic literature, this gem by Ignatius Donnelly is highly recommended. Published by Classic Books International and beautifully produced, Caesar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century would make an ideal gift and it should be a part of everyone's personal library.

Comments

JoJosho JoJosho
Another work of spellbinding speculation from the master of so-hooey-it-may-be-truey? mister ignatius donnelly.
Goldfury Goldfury
An essential book for anyone who wants to truly understand English.
Madis Madis
"Cæsar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century" by Ignatius Donnelly is the 10th book in the Early Classics of Science Fiction series. "Cæsar's Column" was first published in 1890 and though it is far from a great work, it holds a special place in the history of speculative fiction. The novel deals with a dystopian/utopian future (1988) and draws heavily on the author's own political views. Ignatius Donnelly was a populist politician moving from party to party and switching positions on issues frequently, eventually joining the Republican party and being elected as Lieutenant Governor of Minnesota and then to Congress. Donnelly also became known for his writing, as he wrote about such diverse topics as Atlantis, Ragnarok, and the true authorship of Shakespeare's works. Those were all considered non-fiction works though, and after being discredited he wrote "Cæsar's Column", a fictional work, under the pseudonym of Edmund Boisgilbert, M.D., though this was more of a publicity stunt than a real attempt to conceal his identity.

"Cæsar's Column" is an important work in the history of speculative fiction because it is one of the earliest works which brings the ideas of Jules Verne to an American audience, though certainly not with the same level of quality. This work also looks at social Darwinism, and Donnelly's impression of where it will lead the society in the next 100 years. As is a general rule with this series, the quality comes not just with the works being presented, as many of them are far from ideal; but rather it is the supporting documentation which makes them well worth reading. In this case, it is the superb introduction and notes provided by Nicholas Ruddick which make this the ideal edition of this work to read.

"Cæsar's Column: A Story of the Twentieth Century" takes place in the year 1988, mostly in New York City in a society which has decayed and lost its ideals. The narrator for much of the story is Gabriel Welstein, a visitor from the Swiss colony of Uganda, an agricultural utopian society. He has come to the U.S. to bypass the global Wool Ring which has monopolized the commodity, and most of the book is in the form of letters which Gabriel is writing to his brother Heinrich. In the city, Gabriel intervenes to save a beggar, who turns out to be Maximilian Petion, an attorney who is part of a brotherhood (the Brotherhood of Destruction) that is working to overthrow the corrupt ruling class.

Much of the story deals with Donnelly's views on society and politics and in particular on the concept of social Darwinism. He provides a view of future technology which isn't too far off the mark with airships, city streets alight, though with power obtained from the Aurora Borealis instead of electrical power plants. One could say that the televised newspapers are a foreshadowing of the internet as well.

There is some examples of anti-Semitism in the work as well, though as Ruddock discusses in his introduction it is probably not as severe as was the norm at the time, and cites evidence that of all the reviews of the book at the time, not one mentioned Jews or anti-Semitism. He goes on to suggest that Donnelly was concerned with the fate of humanity and not smaller groups of individuals, and that his use of some stereotypes to help the readers identify with larger groups. Indeed, he goes on to mention that Norman Pollack considers Donnelly to be offering anti-anti-Semitism as a solution for anti-Semitism. Nevertheless, the reader should be prepared for it and to take it in the context in which it was intended as well as the time in which it was written.

When viewed on its own, "Cæsar's Column" is not a great book, or even a particularly good one. It is long winded at times, the characters are often two dimensional, and Donnelly's views on politics and society are rather heavily forced on the reader. When it is taken into account the novel's historical position as a bridge between Verne and modern speculative fiction, both in terms of time and society, as well as its early examples of dystopia/utopia and social Darwinism, then the book takes on added value. Add to that the excellent treatment it receives from Nicholas Ruddick and it is easily a four-star result, if not a little higher.
Zieryn Zieryn
On the heals of "Looking Backward","Erewhon" and the success of Jules Verne, Donnelly's book is another of the first SciFi or Dystopias that were published during the late 1800s. Donnelly's narrator takes us through the revolution that occurs in the late 20th century after the world has been taken over by an Oligarchy. In many ways it fore-shadows many of the worlds that are being projected at this time.

Donnelly's world is made up of three or four "countries" (it's never made quite clear) that are each ruled by a small elite, while the rest of the world lives like the workers in "Metropolis". The elite live better than kings while the masses live a dull gray life on the edge of starvation. Into this world comes a 'settler' from the new "State of Uganda". Whites have taken over the massive plateau of the African Lakes Region and turned it into a prosperous 'Eden-like' garden.

(The racism, sexism, anti-clericalism and anti-semitism in the book is so much the norm at the time it was written that it is unabashedly done. All the women are either mothers or 'Peril of Pauline' types just waiting for a man to save and protect them. Only 'whites' are capable as seen by the take-over and settlement of Africa. The two Jews in the book represent unmitigated evil in the form of slaveholders, while the reverse side is a man who is praised for his use of the 'inate cunning' of his people. The Church comes into its' own as the manifestation of the 'approver of the status quo'.)

Strangely enough, there has been little progress in the 'World'. The rich still ride around in carriages, air-power is limited to Dirigibles, there is no mechanized ground transportation newer than railroads, and a type of one way televised (more like computer CRT) for transferring written messages is used. Beside that, people still use rifles and pistols as their main mode of offensive weapons.

Our "Naif" from Africa has come to see the big city and is first amazed and then disgusted by what he sees as 'open' slavery of the workers and worse 'of white people'. He ends up meeting one of the three heads of the world-wide "Brotherhood of Destruction" (where we meet our cunning Jew) just as they are about to start the revolution.

What Donnelly does do well is to show that "Revolution" by the "People" (no matter how well planned or intentioned) will inevitably lead to a mass riot and slaughter of many of the guilty but also a portion of the innocent. In this he uses the excesses just after the storming of the Bastille as his example. On a world-wide scale, revolution means the end of civilization as we know it.

Luckily, our 'Naif' and his 'woman' are able to 'get back home' while they await the end of the 'orgy of blood' that follows the revolution (which included the killing of two of the three leaders by the mob. All in all it's an interesting read from an historical perspective.
fire dancer fire dancer
A book that predicted the conditions we are living today