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eBook Lithic Technology and Regional Variation in Late Neolithic Jordan (BAR International) ePub

eBook Lithic Technology and Regional Variation in Late Neolithic Jordan (BAR International) ePub

by Dawn Nadine Cropper

  • ISBN: 1407308688
  • Category: Ancient Civilizations
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Dawn Nadine Cropper
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: British Archaeological Reports (November 15, 2011)
  • Pages: 151
  • ePub book: 1931 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1370 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi rtf doc
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 546

Description

BOOK DESCRIPTIONThe Late Neolithic period 8350-7850 calBP represents a phase in Jordan s prehistory of which there is little archaeological certainty this is particularly true when considering the dichotomy . BAR Publishing Tel. +44 (0)31 infoublishing.

BAR Publishing Tel. Lithic Technology and Regional Variation in Late Neolithic Jordan. Author: Dawn Nadine Cropper. Publication Year: 2011.

Introduction Lithic analysis: methodology and theory Lithic technology at Umm Meshrat I Retouched artefacts and regional variation Reduction strategies and late Neolithic regional variation Conclusions

Introduction Lithic analysis: methodology and theory Lithic technology at Umm Meshrat I Retouched artefacts and regional variation Reduction strategies and late Neolithic regional variation Conclusions.

Lithic Technology and Regional Variation in Late Neolithic Jordan. In: BAR International Series 2291. Archaeopress, Oxford. Pits and their Contents: The Wadi Rabah Site of Qidron in the Shephela, Israel.

The Neolithic, the final division of the Stone Age, began about 12,000 years ago when the first developments of farming appeared in the Epipalaeolithic Near East, and later in other parts of the world.

Lithic technology and regional variation in late Neolithic Jordan. Are you sure you want to remove Lithic technology and regional variation in late Neolithic Jordan from your list? Lithic technology and regional variation in late Neolithic Jordan. by Dawn Nadine Cropper. Accompanying CD-ROM contains PDF appendix of artifact data. Includes bibliographical references (p. 137-151).

Neolithic cultures are also attested in southeastern Anatolia and northern Mesopotamia by. .

Neolithic cultures are also attested in southeastern Anatolia and northern Mesopotamia by around 8000 B.The identifying characteristic of Neolithic technology is the use of polished or ground stone tools, in contrast to the flaked stone tools used during the Paleolithic era.

The limited regional variation in WHG ancestry we see in the British Neolithic samples could reflect subtle but differing degrees of regional admixture between farmers and foragers, and/or multiple continental source populations.

The limited regional variation in WHG ancestry we see in the British Neolithic samples could reflect subtle but differing degrees of regional admixture between farmers and foragers, and/or multiple continental source populations carrying varying levels of WHG ancestry colonising different regions of Britain. This may reflect the fact that farming arrived in Britain a couple of thousand years later than it did in Europe. The farming population who arrived in Britain may have mastered more of the technologies needed to thrive in northern and western Europe than the farmers who had first expanded into these areas.

Recent papers in Neolithic Jordan . Abstract The aim of this book is to clarify the nature of the early Neolithic period in the Southern Levant as a key period for the beginning of agrarian societies. 9,600 BP to ca. 9,300 BP, and thus a later beginning for the PPNB (about 9,200 BP). In arguing this, sites from the Southern Levant are compared to their counterparts in the Central and Northern Levant and the role of diffusion or local innovation is presented. ZAD 2 is located in an arid environment though the region in antiquity probably featured a more hospitable landscape.

Bar-Yosef, . and A. Gopher.

Written by a lithic analyst and professional flintknapper, this book systematically examines variation in technology, typology, and industries for the Lower, Middle, and Upper Paleolithic; the Epipaleolithic; and Neolithic periods in the Near East. It is extensively illustrated with drawings of stone tools. Bar-Yosef, . An Early Neolithic Village in the Jordan Valley. Part 1: The Archaeology of Netiv Hagdud.

The Late Neolithic period (8350-7850 calBP) represents a phase in Jordans prehistory of which there is little archaeological certainty; this is particularly true when considering the dichotomy of sites in the fertile Mediterranean region and the arid badia. This research has two aims: 1) to conduct the first comprehensive technological analysis of a large assemblage from a pottery-bearing site in the Mediterranean region, and 2) to investigate regional variation in the Late Neolithic period through comparisons of the lithic technology. The results of this research indicate that disparate reduction strategies were used in each region, and these differences cannot be attributed to differential raw material constraints. Similarities between the regions were identified, suggesting that the populations may have originated in the same area. Because the populations were largely isolated, their reduction strategies diverged over time, although some common elements were retained. While this research acknowledges that more comprehensive analyses of Mediterranean assemblages are needed, the current data supports the integration model, whereby ovicaprids were adopted by the hunter-gatherers in the badia.