cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Chinese
eBook The Chinese ePub

eBook The Chinese ePub

by Jasper Becker

  • ISBN: 0195149408
  • Category: Asia
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Jasper Becker
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (April 25, 2002)
  • Pages: 496
  • ePub book: 1929 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1224 kb
  • Other: rtf lit mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 580

Description

In The Chinese, Jasper Becker, China's premier western correspondent, strips the country of its myths and .

In The Chinese, Jasper Becker, China's premier western correspondent, strips the country of its myths and captures the Chinese as they really live. For nearly two decades Becker has lived in China. Whether it is a loutish police officer in a Hunan brothel or an impoverished peasant in the southwest, Becker shows most people are ready to speak the truth. Their voices go a long way toward mapping out the challenges that lie ahead. -Dexter Roberts, Business Week.

In "The Chinese," Jasper Becker, China's premier resident western correspondent, strips the country of its myths and captures the Chinese as they really live. For nearly two decades Becker has lived in China, and reported from areas where western journalists are forbidden. His award-winning "Hungry Ghosts," hailed for its brutal honesty in the west, was banned in China

In 1995, he joined the staff of the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post

In 1995, he joined the staff of the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post. He was later promoted to the senior position of Beijing bureau chief, which meant he was in charge of all mainland content. In 2002, he lost his job, in an experience he writes about in a Washington Post column headlined "Why I Was Fired in Hong Kong.

Author:Becker, Jasper. All of our paper waste is recycled within the UK and turned into corrugated cardboard

Author:Becker, Jasper. All of our paper waste is recycled within the UK and turned into corrugated cardboard. Can't find what you're looking for?. No nation on Earth is as newsworthy as 21st-century China-and no book could be timelier thanDragon Rising,as world attention focuses on China's all-out effort to present itself as a modern world power and on the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

In The Chinese, Jasper Becker, China's premier resident western correspondent, strips the country of its myths and captures the Chinese as they really live. His award-winning Hungry Ghosts, hailed for its brutal honesty in the west, was banned in China. Here Becker is more candid still, reporting from all over the country: from the tiny, crowded homes of the swollen megalopolises of the southeast rim to a vast, secret network of thousands of defense bunkers in the northwest.

In THE CHINESE, Jasper Becker strips the country of its myths & captures the Chinese as they really live. For nearly 2 decades Becker has lived in China, & reported from areas where western journalists are forbidden. Becker exposes Chinese society in layers from the bottom upward: illiterate peasants; businessmen; local despots; the 20 grades of Party apparatchiks; & the dominant, comparatively small caste of party leaders who are often ignorant of the people they rule. Becker lets the Chinese speak for themselves, in voices that are rich & moving.

In 2002, he lost his job, in an experience he writes about in a Washington Post column headlined "Why I Was Fired in Hong Kong. Becker’s dismissal for insubordination was widely reported in the international media.

A lively first hand portrait of Chinese society by a veteran British resident correspondent. The books was written in 1998 but is still relevant today as the basic structure of Chinese society has not changed and the issues and challenges remain the same. It shows how China works in the context both of its long history and its more recent Communist past.

Jasper Becker's book, The Chinese, was hailed as the best single-volume introduction to this enormous, inscrutable society. The Washington Post said, ''He has been everywhere and asked every question,'' describing his conclusions as ''right in both details and analysis. Since then, China's role in world affairs has only grown greater.

In The Chinese, Jasper Becker, China's premier western correspondent, strips the country of its myths and captures the Chinese as they really live. For nearly two decades Becker has lived in China, and reported from areas where most visitors do not reach. Here he is at his most candid, reporting from all over the country: from tiny, crowded homes in the swollen cities of the southeast rim to a vast, secret network of thousands of defense bunkers in the northwest. He exposes Chinese society in all of its layers: from remote, illiterate peasants; to the rising classes of businessmen; to local despots; the twenty grades of Party apparatchicks; to the dominant, comparatively small caste of Party leaders who are often ignorant of the people they rule. Becker lets the Chinese speak for themselves, in voices that are rich and moving. He teaches a great deal about the magnitude--and the false face--of China's vaunted economic boom, and further shows the pervasive institutionalized crime that has risen out of economic poverty. In all, Becker reveals a China very different than our long-held assumptions depict. The Chinese is the hidden story of people of the world's largest nation--a nation so poorly understood and so vital to the future.

Comments

Dozilkree Dozilkree
Jasper Becker writes a book that is as affable and easy to read as it is insightful. The man understands China, and walks the reader through it, first, by a bird's-eye view of its history, then, by describing, one by one, each of its social classes.

Through a combination of journalistic anecdotes and well-documented research, Becker makes convincing points in each of his descriptions.

All in all, a definite go-to book for all scholars in China-related topics or persons interested in one of the oldest, most successful cultures and states in the world.
Rollers from Abdun Rollers from Abdun
Jasper becker is one of the best China hands alive today. A seasoned author, he has also written accurate books about North Korea and Mongolia. Formerly with the South China morning post, he was pressured to leave after Hong Kong returned to mainland control. Today he follows China for the Christian science monitor. He not only writes with the concise, punchy style of a top reporter, he is objective and accurate.

In THE CHINESE, Becker dissects the how and why of the modern "people's Republic," which is of course, not a republic, and does little good for the people.

I will preface my review by noting that I speak Mandarin, and lived 17 years in East Asia, including in the PRC and Taiwan, and that I had many interactions with PRC officials at many levels and in many regions.

First, I am in almost complete agreement with Becker's descriptions of the PRC, a nation where every data point is suspect and virtually every official a crook.

Second, I think Becker is dead-on about so many of the problems that face China. Imminent or extant crises in health care, environment, clean governance, banking, and foreign policy. We in the West somehow look at a crooked, demagogic cadre of self-aggrandizing time-servers and preceive a patient and wise authoritarian caretaker government. Becker exposes the truth.

I cannot believe that some reviewers, who apparently have never spent any significant time in China, have stood up for "achievements" of Chairman Mao. For instance, one claimed agricultural triumphs under the Great Helmsman, without explaining how millions starved to death simultaneously, and cannibalism resurfaced.

Please ignore these sort of critics and DO read this book.

It is a breathe of fresh air for those who believe the PRC is a coming superpower, responsible member of the world community, or well-governed.
Pemand Pemand
There are shorter books about China, there are better books about doing business in China, and there are more academic books about China. But, if you want to introduce yourself to the broad landscape of China, from the city to the countryside, or the broad spectrum of Chinese social classes, from the itinerant day-laborers working in aging factories to the entrepreneurs catering to American corporations, you must read begin with this book.

Becker's reportage benefits tremendously from the fact that he has been writing articles for the South China Morning Post for the past 25 years. And, many of the chapters, which include reports from his travels, interviews with Chinese entrepreneurs, and careful dissections of obscure Chinese Communist committee meetings, are fuller treatments of articles he has written. Some of the detail that Becker engages in can put demands on the commitment of the reader, but to understand the importance of "enterprise zones" to China's staggering economic growth requires this commitment.

Nevertheless, Becker is not a China "booster." His book ends darkly, with a final chapter on the limits of freedom placed on ordinary Chinese, but especially the human rights abuses suffered by dissenting journalists and intellectuals. China promises so much, but the Chinese social class which runs corporate as well as government affairs, must come to terms with their own disregard of the rule of law.

Becker warns that, although economic power is admirable, it does not excuse a poor human rights record or indifference to Western standards of contractual obligations.
Nalme Nalme
It seesm to be the rule with most books on China that if one reviewer gives a book a 5 star rating and thinks it's an earth shattering work of unheard of beauty, the next reviewer will give it 1 star and say that it's the biggest load of dross they've ever read and bears no relation to the reality of China and the Chinese. Well when reading tihs review, do bear in mind I'm no Old China Hand, but I rather enjoyed this book.
The book takes the form of a series of largely unconnected chapters each of which deals with a different aspect of (largely contemporary or near contemporary) Chinese life. The book does not provide exhaustive coverage of all aspects of China, but for somebody new to the subject it is interesting enough (the author includes a few personal snippets and occassionally focuses on specific Chinese people he's met) and provides food for thought.
The author sources some of his chapters and, especially in chapters dealing with business or demographics, litters the prose with figures and statistics. This is useful, but not THAT useful. The book is not ordered as an academic text and personally (maybe I'm just stupid, mind) having read it I couldn't quote the figures to you - they mostly gave a broad impression which was then washed away as I carried on through the book.
It's an interesting book. I'd certainly recommend people read it if they are relatively new to the subject. But on the whole it's worth while not ONLY reading this book. China is such a complex (and controversial) subject that reading around fairly thoroughly is essential for any serious understanding. In truth, I get the impression that learning the language and visiting the country are probably essential too! If you want to whet your appetite with something fairly readable and reasonably broad brush, this is a pretty good starting point.