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eBook Producing Guanxi: Sentiment, Self, and Subculture in a North China Village (Comparative and International Working-) ePub

eBook Producing Guanxi: Sentiment, Self, and Subculture in a North China Village (Comparative and International Working-) ePub

by Andrew B. Kipnis

  • ISBN: 0822318733
  • Category: Asia
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Andrew B. Kipnis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books (January 22, 1997)
  • Pages: 248
  • ePub book: 1572 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1343 kb
  • Other: lrf lit lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 907

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He is author of Producing Guanxi: Sentiment, Self, and Subculture in a North China Village. He is the author of Between Politics and Markets: Firms, Competition, and Institutional Change in Post-Mao China (Cambridge, 2001).

Producing guanxi: Sentiment, self, and subculture in a north China . Comparative Studies in Society and History 37 (1), 110-135, 1995. Subjectification and education for quality in China.

Producing guanxi: Sentiment, self, and subculture in a north China village. Duke University Press, 1997. Suzhi: A Keyword Approach. The China Quarterly 186, 295-313, 2006. Modern China 22 (3), 285-314, 1996. Contemporary China: Society and social change. T Jacka, AB Kipnis, S Sargeson. Cambridge University Press, 2013. Economy and Society 40 (2), 289-306, 2011.

Throughout China the formation of guanxi, or social connections, involves friends, families, colleagues, and acquaintances in complex networks of social support and sentimental attachment. Focusing on this process in one rural north China village, Fengjia, Andrew Kipnis shows what guanxi production reveals about the evolution of village political economy, kinship and gender, and local patterns of subjectivity in Dengist China.

Author : Andrew B. Kipnis,Andrew B. Kipnis,Kipnis. Publisher : Duke University Press. Culture And Customs of Mozambique( Series - Culture and Customs of Africa ) (English). Red Ties and Residential Schools: Indigenous Siberians in a Post-Soviet State (English). Talking about People: Readings in Contemporary Cultural Anthropology (English). Culture and Customs of Zambia (English).

Kipnis, A. 1997, Producing Guanxi: Sentiment, Self, and Subculture in a North China Village (Duke University Press, .  . Yan, Y. 1996, The Flow of Gifts: Reciprocity and Social Networks in a Chinese Village (Stanford University Press, California). Lee, D. Y. & Dawes, P. 2005, ‘Guanxi, trust, and long-term orientation in Chinese business markets’, Journal of International Marketing 13, 28–56. CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Sentiment, Self, and Subculture in a North China Village. Kipnis also offers a rare comparative analysis of how these practices relate to the varied and variable phenomenon of guanxi throughout China and as it has changed over time. Andrew Kipnis’s book is essential for scholars interested in the structure and practice of guanxi in China and for scholars interested in structural differences between rural and urban areas in reform era China. The China Quarterly.

The New Silk Road and China’s Evolving Grand Strategy. Leverett et al. Grapes of Wrath: Twisting Arms to Get Villagers to Cooperate with Agribusiness in China. Luo et al. Framing the Funeral: Death Rituals of Chinese Communist Party Leaders.

12. William C. Hsiao and Linying Hu, The State of Medical Professionalism in China: Past, Present and Future, in William P. Alford, Kenneth Winston and William C. Kirby (eds), Prospects.

Throughout China the formation of guanxi, or social connections, involves friends, families, colleagues, and acquaintances in complex networks of social support and sentimental attachment. Focusing on this process in one rural north China village, Fengjia, Andrew Kipnis shows what guanxi production reveals about the evolution of village political economy, kinship and gender, and local patterns of subjectivity in Dengist China. His work offers a detailed description of the communicative actions—such as gift giving, being a host or guest, participating in weddings or funerals—that produce, manage, and deny guanxi in a specific time and place. Kipnis also offers a rare comparative analysis of how these practices relate to the varied and variable phenomenon of guanxi throughout China and as it has changed over time.Producing Guanxi combines the theory of Pierre Bourdieu and the insights of symbolic anthropology to contest past portrayals of guanxi as either a function of Chinese political economics or an unchanging Confucian social structure. In this analysis guanxi emerges as a purposeful human effort that makes use of past cultural logics while generating new ones. By exploring the role of sentiment in the creation of self, Kipnis critiques recent theories of subjectivity for their narrow focus on language and discourse, and contributes to the anthropological discussion of comparative selfhood. Navigating a path between mainstream social science and abstract social theory, Kipnis presents a more nuanced examination of guanxi than has previously been available and contributes generally to our understanding of relationships and human action.