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eBook Power Games: The Olympics of Ancient Greece. David Stuttard ePub

eBook Power Games: The Olympics of Ancient Greece. David Stuttard ePub

by David Stuttard

  • ISBN: 0714122726
  • Category: Deliver toandnbsp;Russian Federation
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: David Stuttard
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: British Museum Press (September 1, 2011)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1842 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1771 kb
  • Other: txt lrf lrf mbr
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 439

Description

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Power; the power of the gods; the power of Greek cities; the power of the human body: all these were celebrated at the ancient Olympic Games. This absorbing narrative, told from a spectators viewpoint, revolves around the Games of 416 BC a turning point in Greek politics when a cold war between Athens and other major cities was about to erupt into bloody fighting. The reader vividly experiences what it was like to be there, to witness the rituals, official banquets, bloody contests, victory celebrations and subsequent political parleys.

Start by marking Power Games: The Olympics of Ancient Greece. David Stuttard as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. David Stuttard as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Power; the power of the gods; the power of Greek cities; the power of the human body: all these were celebrated at the ancient Olympic Games. Ancient Olympia symbolized excellence and supremacy in every sense of the word, not only athletic, but also political.

Running through this narrative is the key point that the Olympic Games, while centred around athletic competition, actually spent much time on other.

Running through this narrative is the key point that the Olympic Games, while centred around athletic competition, actually spent much time on other things (religious sacrifice and banqueting), as well as providing occasion for a whole host of trades and political manoeuvring.

Power Games: Ritual and Rivalry at the Ancient Greek Olympics (Paperback). David Stuttard (author). Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Читать бесплатно книгу Power games. Ritual and rivalry at the Ancient Greek Olympics (Stuttard . и другие произведения в разделе Каталог. Доступны электронные, печатные и аудиокниги, музыкальные произведения, фильмы. На сайте вы можете найти издание, заказать доставку или забронировать. Возможна доставка в удобную библиотеку.

British Museum Press. Power; the power of the gods; the power of Greek cities; the power of the human body: all these were celebrated at the ancient Olympic Games

British Museum Press. Every four years, this international festival carefully timed to coincide with the August full moon drew the strongest and fastest athletic champions, hoping to win glory for their city-state. With them came the ruling elite, equally intent on displaying their city's power and prestige by excelling at the Games.

David Stuttard and Sam Moorhead, 'Riding to Resurrection' . This article presents an interpretation of the Parthenon Frieze.

David Stuttard and Sam Moorhead, 'Riding to Resurrection' (about the Parthenon Frieze), British Museum Magazine No. 62 (Winter 2008), pp. 50-53 more. David Stuttard, Power and Politics on the Acropolis (British Museum Press 2013).

The first book to tell the Greek story through the interconnecting lives of the men and women who shaped its politics and literature, its science and philosophy, its art and sport. But who were these people, what do we know of their lives, and how did they interact with one another?

Power games : ritual and rivalry at the Ancient Greek Olympics.

Power games : ritual and rivalry at the Ancient Greek Olympics. Ancient Olympia symbolized excellence and supremacy i. More). A Radiosity System for Real-time Photo-realism. David Stuttard, Adam D. Worrall, Derek J. Paddon, Claire P. Willis.

Power; the power of the gods; the power of Greek cities; the power of the human body: all these were celebrated at the ancient Olympic Games. Ancient Olympia symbolized excellence and supremacy in every sense of the word, not only athletic, but also political. Every four years, this international festival carefully timed to coincide with the August full moon drew the strongest and fastest athletic champions, hoping to win glory for their city-state. With them came the ruling elite, equally intent on displaying their city's power and prestige by excelling at the Games. After the athletic contests, Olympia also served as the ideal forum for political parleys and alliances. This absorbing narrative, told from a spectators viewpoint, revolves around the Games of 416 BC a turning point in Greek politics when a cold war between Athens and other major cities was about to erupt into bloody fighting. The reader vividly experiences what it was like to be there, to witness the rituals, official banquets, bloody contests, victory celebrations and subsequent political parleys.

Comments

Alsardin Alsardin
Ancient games had no commercial establishments for baths, beds or toilets. Like us, there was cheating though you'd be banned for life.
CopamHuk CopamHuk
This is both informative and an interesting synopsis on the History of the Ancient Olympic Games. The author does a good job in imagining how the town of Olympia functioned nearer to each Olympic quadrennium. He illustrates the importance of the Eleans and their management of the sacred rituals which was actually equally of importance to the greeks as the actual sporting events. He is able to provide, based upon his extensive research, a good recollection on each sporting event schedule as well as what greeks perceived to be the best physical attributes for each sporting participant. The author does not only give a generalization but specifically refers to one Olympic game; 416 bc. The year which Alcibiades won his 4 chariot race. The author pinpoints this key Olympic victory for Alcibiades as being one of the last Olympics prior to the beginning of the decline of the Athenian age. The author then comments on how this decline changed the Olympics (although they would remain as a sporting event but then it grew outside of the Panhellenic community). In addition, the author describes the structures that were used at Olympia, their meaning in ritual, religion and artistic ability to shape Hellenic culture and influence Roman culture afterwards. The author does a great job in providing many reference materials and bibliographies on how he came about in presenting his hypotheses. After reading this author's work, I now wish to return to Olympia as I have a new sense of knowledge and perception of not only the Olympia but also the surrounding countryside.
Gavirus Gavirus
As much as the author loved writing about the Parthenon – the elegant rhythm of the language there tells it all – as much one gets the feeling that this book was a bit of a chore for him. The language is uneven, suddenly rising to Pindaric heights when describing a game, dry to businesslike at others. Some points are made again and again (yes, so much adrenalin, and yes, we got the point: the Greek civilization was different from ours, and for the Greeks winning was everything), as if he was at loss for something to say. There is a legion of “perhaps” stalking the pages – inevitable, of course, but tedious.

The author chose to zoom in on just one of the Olympic events, that of 416 BC, which provided the backdrop to Alcibiades’ antics in Athens. Politicking was certainly part of the Games, but it was collateral to them, and mostly hidden. There is little fact to go on, and the story meanders for lack of a clear story line. More cogently, using a macro-lens does is not quite satisfactory. It is a bit like seeing flocks of starlings fly their breath-taking evolutions at dusk, but wanting to explain the phenomenon by zeroing in on just one of the birds.

The Olympic games may have been the oldest ones in Greece, but others had emerged. Periodic athletic games seem to have been a specialty of the Greek world. What is surprising is that winners came from anywhere, any size town, including far away locations. In fact, it was a way of life, affording even poor youngsters a chance to emerge socially. Exploring this larger framework of the games over time would have given a better sense of what went on beyond the 13 races and the religious ceremonies. Here FINLEY is far superior. I’d strongly recommend this book instead.