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eBook The Classic Slum ePub

eBook The Classic Slum ePub

by Robert Roberts

  • ISBN: 0719004535
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Robert Roberts
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Manchester Univ Pr (June 1, 1978)
  • Pages: 219
  • ePub book: 1478 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1204 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 893

Description

Robert Roberts was born in a Salford slum in 1905, the son of corner shopkeepers.

Robert Roberts was born in a Salford slum in 1905, the son of corner shopkeepers. While a teacher he began to write stories, plays, BBC scripts and stories, several of which won him scholarships and awards. After sixteen years of hill farming, Robert Roberts started to teach in prisons and became an acknowledged expert on adult illiteracy

Roberts writes in The Classic Slum in one of the important quotes from the book, the homes of the very poor contained little or no bought furniture. They made do with boxes and slept in their clothes and in what other garments they could beg or filch. Of such people there were millions.

Roberts writes in The Classic Slum in one of the important quotes from the book, the homes of the very poor contained little or no bought furniture.

Taking it's title from Frederick Engels' description of Salford, The Classic Slum is part social history, part autobiography and part oral-history book.

The Classic Slum book. Roberts was born into a slum family in Salford, but they were slightly better off than many as they owned the ‘corne The Classic Slum – Brilliant Social History of the Slums. I have recently re-read this classic book of social history, The Classic Slum wipes away any ‘romantic’ thoughts about early 20th century poverty in Salford. The author Robert Roberts wrote this book, born in 1905 wrote this in the latter part of his life, and it is a recollection of his first 25 years in Salford.

Penguin (Non-Classics). inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

A Ragged Schooling: Growing Up in the Classic Slum by. Robert Roberts. Roberts' Guide for Butlers & Household St by.

Robert Roberts (1905–1974) was an English teacher and writer. Roberts was born in the slums of Salford. For many years, his parents ran the corner shop, selling everyday necessities to the often very poor customers. His books The Classic Slum and A Ragged Schooling reflect his experiences there. The books have been hailed as classics of working class autobiography. The Classic Slum (1971). A Ragged Schooling (1976).

I have recently re-read this classic book of social history, The Classic Slum wipes away any ‘romantic’ thoughts about early 20th century poverty in Salford.

If you enjoy the works of Robert Sheckley then we highly recommend this publication for your book collection. 1 071. 0. Published: 2009.

Worn dust jacket has a short tear, a faded spine and some writing indentation on the front, page edges tanned. Shipped from the U.K. All orders received before 3pm sent that weekday.

Comments

iSlate iSlate
Should be required to graduate grammar, middle, high school, college, grad school, and read at the dinner table by Millennials to their Snowflakes. I highly suggest that one's smart phone be replaced with this book, and read as compulsively. Standing in line, talking to your child, mowing the lawn, sitting in class, on the bus, 100% of everywhere. Reality may set in again.
Gaeuney Gaeuney
I read this book trying to understand lives of working class people in Salford. I wanted to learn what school was like for children, what housing was like, and what the rhythm of daily like was like. I recommend this book to anyone interested in social history. It's a good read.
Jaiarton Jaiarton
A fascinating book for those interested in life in an English slum, but especially valuable for those whose ancestors lived there.
Welen Welen
Insightful.
ℓo√ﻉ ℓo√ﻉ
Such a skillful blend of solidly researched socioeconomic history and autobiography! This is a witty, readable look at the industrial England of the common people in the early years of the 20th century. As the author says: "Born... in an area which, sixty years before, Frederick Engels had called the 'classic slum', I grew up in what was perhaps an ideal position for viewing the English proletarian caste system in all its late flower." (p. 13)

Just a couple of important contentions made by the author:

"The pre-1914 movements for her political emancipation, bourgeois in origin and function, meant very little to the lower working-class woman. In the end the consequences of [WWI], not the legal acquisition of female rights, released her from bondage... The events of 1914-18, then, did not start, but they accelerated significantly, a movement already well developed, one which would go some way to release... the working-class women of Britain. (pp. 201-202)

"The post-[WWI] decade, for all its great social shortcomings, was a far more humane and civilized time than the twenty years which preceded it." (p. 237)

This book gives a "you are there" immersion into a time and place now gone and into a way of life in some ways admirable, in all too many ways deplorable. Since it's so well indexed, it goes on my shelves for future reference. Some of the index entries that might tempt you: Eating habits; Games, street; Pawnshops; Conjugal rights; Burial club; Cigarette cards; Vagrants; Respectability; Teeth.
Vosho Vosho
The author grew up in 'the classic slum' described by Engels, and his authoritative study explains better than anything else I have ever read why the British proletariat never embraced the Communist Party and revolution, despite more than adequate grievances against their 'guv'nors' to do so. The rich industrialists and middle classes owed a great deal to the royal family (who were by this point in history politically impotent), because the royals remained a central focus for British patriotism.
Despite a childhood bereft of grass, flowers, and trees, the author had an extremely intelligent and diligent mother (whose own formal education was cut short when her father died and she had to start working in the cotton industry at age nine) and a somewhat less responsible father (who nonetheless worked and brought home most of his pay to his family), and so he escaped the worst a slum childhood could bring. Yet the pervading stench of fear - fear of the chance illness or injury which would cast the family down the slippery slope into the workhouse and its utter hunger and cruel degradation - characterizes the lives of the late Edwardian slum-dweller.
The book was next to impossible to put down until I'd read every last word.
Frosha Frosha
I was raised to be an anglophile, and revere all things British. I still do, but I'm wiser about it now. Mr Roberts, who worked as a reading instructor in British prisons, gives an honest and not unaffectionate account of a seriously-mismanaged society. It's also very much a personal memoir of the author's parents and the world he lived in. It is here that we learn how England became what it is today, and that both the welfare state and communism had legitimate roots. Salford was not a pleasant place to live back then: in many respects, it was terrifying. Be sure to read the two extra sections at the end. One is a sobering account of the life of a man who did the same job in the same machine shop for decades--yet it is a true celebration of work and life.
This book looks back to Edwardian English society. The author happens to have grown up during this time and gives a vivid account of the "Working Class" society in which he lived. A must read for someone who is interested in British history.