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eBook Naseby 1645: The triumph of the New Model Army (Campaign) ePub

eBook Naseby 1645: The triumph of the New Model Army (Campaign) ePub

by Graham Turner,Martin Marix Evans

  • ISBN: 1846030781
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Graham Turner,Martin Marix Evans
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing; First Edition edition (June 19, 2007)
  • Pages: 96
  • ePub book: 1595 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1907 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 139

Description

He introduces the origins of the campaign and explores the strengths and weaknesses of the opposing armies, including the famous New Model Army

He introduces the origins of the campaign and explores the strengths and weaknesses of the opposing armies, including the famous New Model Army.

New Model Army 1645-60 (Men-at-Arms). Marston Moor 1644: The beginning of the end (Campaign). It was my first book on this topic so I am hardly an expert, but I believe author made a good job.

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Martin Marix Evans studied at universities in the United States and Britain, and graduated in Law from the University of Cambridge before entering a career in publishing. He established his own firm of book packagers in 1989. He is the author of guides to the D-Day operations, Ypres and Operation Market Garden. His work for Osprey includes Passchendaele and the Battles of Ypres 1914-18.

He introduces the origins of the campaign and explores the strengths and weaknesses of the opposing armies, including the famous New Model Army

He introduces the origins of the campaign and explores the strengths and weaknesses of the opposing armies, including the famous New Model Army.

Martin Marix Evans, Graham Turner. On the pivotal day of 14 June 1645 Charles I's Royalist Army and Parliament's New Model Army made battle at Naseby. The traditional condemnation of Prince Rupert's military strategy is undermined, and the significance of Okey's Dragoons in precipitating the action explained.

Naseby 1645: The triumph of the New Model Army.

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On the pivotal day of 14 June 1645 Charles I's Royalist Army and Parliament's New Model Army made battle at Naseby

On the pivotal day of 14 June 1645 Charles I's Royalist Army and Parliament's New Model Army made battle at Naseby.

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Osprey's study of the pivotal battle of the English Civil War (1642-1651). In 1645 the fate of the British monarchy hung in the balance as the Royalist Army under King Charles I fought the Parliamentarian Army for control of the country. In this book Martin Marix Evans gives a vivid account of the pivotal battle of Naseby. He introduces the origins of the campaign and explores the strengths and weaknesses of the opposing armies, including the famous New Model Army. Dramatic and fast-paced first-hand accounts tell how the fighting unfolded on that fateful day. Featuring strategic maps and new information regarding the troops and battlefield, the author uses his unparalleled knowledge of the terrain, as well as archaeological evidence, to piece together a remarkable blow-by-blow account of the battle that lost the King his throne.

Comments

Thetahuginn Thetahuginn
The author's text is quite good. He gives a comprehensive account of the campaign and battle (but see the criticisms by other reviewers), but he is let down by the colour maps and illustrations. The two two-page colour plates are of `Okey's dragoons' at Sulby hedges and `Englands and Wadborough'. The first shows us 6 dragoons and some horses behind the hedge; you can just see a few `corners' above the hedge - I assume a misprint for `cornet', although it appears twice. The second shows us various Parliamentarian soldiers attacking the women from the baggage train, with a few Royalist colours emerging from the powder smoke on a hilltop in the distance. Two really important scenes from the battle! Apart from two cavalrymen, all the soldiers, infantry and dragoons, appear to have the same uniform, red coat and blue cuffs; I thought different coloured cuffs were used to differentiate the regiments. I suppose though that the dragoons could co-incidentally have the same colour cuffs as the infantry attacking the women.

The map of England and Wales showing the route of the armies in the campaign could have done with losing the north of England and having more of the towns mentioned in the text. The two colour maps of the armies making contact have much better quality of detail. The three two-page bird's eye view battlefield maps suffer from having detail lost in the fold of the gutter; they should be printed as two panels with a gap for the binding in between, but the information included is as good as I have seen elsewhere.

The author makes use of archaeological research for placing of events on the battlefield, through the surveys of where musket balls have been found, and the arcs of fire they imply. He has also identified a fold of ground in front of the Parliamentarian centre which would have funnelled the Royalist front into a sort of wedge at the start of the attack, which I have not seen mentioned before. He also suggests that the presence of Irish women in the baggage train might imply the presence of Irish troops swept up from Chester and the Welsh Marches, though it used to be though that they were more likely to have been Welsh women.

This book could have been a four or five-star book, but is let down by the colour plates and maps.

I read a library copy.
Thetalune Thetalune
With "Naseby 1645" Osprey finally described the decisive battle in the Wars of Three Kingdoms, and it was described pretty well. Martin Marix Evans gives a good account of the campaign leading to the battle and a honest description of the battle - although I must admit, that I had to read the description of the fight itself three times before finally getting the picture right. It was my first book on this topic so I am hardly an expert, but I believe author made a good job.

There are however two things that I couldn't find in this book. The first one was WHAT exactly was doing the royalist cavalry of Prince Maurice after routing parliamentarian left wing - this is an important point, which was not described to my total satisfaction. The second one was the description of Fairfax and Cromwell attack against the Northern Horses of the good Sir Marmaduke Langdale - it was actually the single most important moment in all the wars in England, Scotland and Ireland between 1640 and 1660 and there is no good explanation WHY royalist cavalry on the left wing gave way so easily. The explanation that they were "tired and homesick" is a little easy, considering that this was the feeling of most of the soldiers in both armies... Maps are not totally helpful when explaining those two crucial points, in fact they are much less detailed than usually in Osprey books. Which is a pity.

But the real black spot are the colour plates. There are only two of them and it is already bad in itself (it was one of the most crucial points in British history!). But even worse is the fact, that with his usual aversion to describe the real fighting, Graham Turner devoted one of the plates to the plundering of royalist camp and the killing and mutilation of women in the camp by the New Model Army soldiers. Which leaves only one plate for the battle itself - and rather than showing the crucial cavalry fight between Fairfax and Cromwell parliamentarian cavalry and royalist Northern Horse, it pictures the harassing attack of Okey's dragoons. I believe this is a poor choice and consider this Osprey Campaign title as one of the less well illustrated since a long time. One more time, here is a message for the Osprey editors: "With everything that is now available on the web, what makes people buy your (short) books are maps and especially colour plates - if you keep messing them, you will finally loose your readers".