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eBook Marston Moor 1644: The beginning of the end (Campaign) ePub

eBook Marston Moor 1644: The beginning of the end (Campaign) ePub

by Graham Turner,John Tincey

  • ISBN: 1841763349
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Graham Turner,John Tincey
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing; First Edition edition (March 11, 2003)
  • Pages: 96
  • ePub book: 1282 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1453 kb
  • Other: lit docx mobi lrf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 466

Description

Download books for free. Книга Osprey Campaign №119. Marston Moor 1644 Книги Исторические Автор: . incey Формат: pdf Издат.

Download books for free. Marston Moor 1644 Osprey Campaign №119. Categories: History\Military History. Издательство: Osprey.

In Osprey's Campaign Marston Moor 1644, John Tincey summarizes one of the more decisive battles of the English Civil War that lost northern England for the King Charles I. This summary is more interesting than the previous volume on First Newbury, and while the author tends. This summary is more interesting than the previous volume on First Newbury, and while the author tends to digress on issues of historiography, he does provide a relatively clean campaign narrative. In standard Osprey campaign series format, Marston Moor 1644 begins with short sections on the background to the campaign and opposing commanders

Marston Moor 1644 book. Although clearly an important battle, Tincey notes that Charles I's victories in 1644 (and the stand of the Whitecoats) made sure that Marston Moor was not an even more complete victory.

Marston Moor 1644 book.

Book in the Osprey Campaign Series). The entry of the Scots into the English Civil War (1642-1651) on 19 January 1644 on the side of Parliament radically changed the balance of power in the North of England. The Royalists in the North were forced onto the defensive and besieged in York. In a bold march Prince Rupert outmanoeuvred his enemies and relieved York without a shot being fired.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Marston Moor 1644: The Beginning Of The End. John Tincey, Graham Turner. Category: Исторические.

The beginning of the end. Campaign 119. Author: John Tincey. Illustrator: Graham Turner. His TV and video appearances include documentaries on the Armada, Borodino and Waterloo. Graham Turner is a leading historical artist, specialising in the medieval period. He has illustrated numerous titles for Osprey, covering a wide variety of subjects from the dress of the 10th-century armies of the Caliphates, through the action of bloody medieval battles, to the daily life of the British Redcoat of the late 18th century.

MARSTON MOOR 1644 The entry of the Scots into the English Civil War (1642–1651) on 19 January 1644 on the side of Parliament radically changed the balance of power in the North of England. However, when Rupert met the allied army in battle on Marston Moor on 2 July his cavalry was defeated by Cromwell's Ironsides who then turned on the Royalist infantry

Author: John Tincey Graham Turner.

Author: John Tincey Graham Turner.

The Beginning Of The End (Campaign). Published March 11, 2003 by Osprey Publishing. Marston Moor, Battle of, England, 1644, HISTORY. For Charles I the new year of 1644 held out every prospect of victory over his rebellious Parliament.

The entry of the Scots into the English Civil War (1642–1651) on 19 January 1644 on the side of Parliament radically changed the balance of power in the North of England. The Royalists in the North were forced onto the defensive and besieged in York. In a bold march Prince Rupert outmanoeuvred his enemies and relieved York without a shot being fired. However, when Rupert met the allied army in battle on Marston Moor on 2 July his cavalry was defeated by Cromwell's Ironsides who then turned on the Royalist infantry. The result was a hard-fought but catastrophic defeat; the Royalist army was crushed and their forces driven from the north of England.

Comments

Coidor Coidor
In Osprey's Campaign #119 Marston Moor 1644, John Tincey summarizes one of the more decisive battles of the English Civil War that lost northern England for the King Charles I. This summary is more interesting than the previous volume on First Newbury, and while the author tends to digress on issues of historiography, he does provide a relatively clean campaign narrative.
In standard Osprey campaign series format, Marston Moor 1644 begins with short sections on the background to the campaign and opposing commanders. The section on opposing armies is unusually long at 22 pages (plus two more pages for the actual order of battle), and includes subsections on deployment and fighting tactics. Unfortunately, much of this space devoted to opposing armies is spent discussing and comparing various modern theories about unknown or controversial aspects of the campaign. Most readers will probably find this section tedious and distracting from the campaign narrative. The author then spends 14 pages on the early stages of the campaign, particularly the relief of York, and then covers the battle itself in 26 pages. The campaign narrative is supported by five 2-D maps (the opening campaigns of 1644, the siege of York, Rupert's march north, the relief of York, and the aftermath of Marston Moor) as well as three 3-D Birds Eye View maps of the battle itself. The three battle scenes by Graham Turner (probably Osprey's best contract artist) are excellent: the relief of York, Cromwell's Ironsides charging and the last stand of the Whitecoats.
Most of the military actions of the English Civil War appear confusing to modern American readers and herein lies the value of studying such conflicts. Unlike our own Civil War, which was fairly linear in nature, the English Civil War was set in a more fluid and non-linear environment. From the King's perspective, the enemy lay in the southeast, southwest and northeast. This non-linear combat environment and low force density resulted in very mobile operational methods and control of population centers (with attendant tax resources) became the decisive terrain. One such piece of decisive terrain was the city of York in the northeast; the Parliamentarians besieged it and the King sent Prince Rupert's army to lift the siege. Rupert's relief of York is probably the best part of this volume and should be studied carefully by military professionals. The Parliamentarian army occupied a favorable blocking position on key terrain overlooking the most obvious direct route into the city and awaited Rupert's advance. Boldly, Rupert fixed the enemy's attention with a small feint and then marched the bulk of his army across an undefended bridge far to the north and then slipped into York without firing a shot.
As for the Battle of Marston Moor, Tincey does a decent job describing the battle, although it is not always clear from his account why one side or the other prevailed in certain engagements. Clearly, the fact that Rupert's army did not expect battle to begin so late in the day and was surprised by the enemy's sudden attack was a major factor (similar to the Roman disaster at Adrianople in 378). Tincey argues that discipline was also a factor, in that the superior Royalist cavalry was difficult to reign in after one charge, while Cromwell's Ironsides were capable of reforming quickly. However, one could argue that it really was an issue of managing reserves, and both armies suffered from poor command and control after the initial action began at Marston Moor. Although both sides had light cannon at Marston Moor, there is virtually no mention of their participation. Tincey is also vague on casualties, relying instead only on a 17th Century source (no mention of modern diggings on the battlefield).
Snowseeker Snowseeker
Nice history of the battle of Marston Moor
Darkshaper Darkshaper
Another excellent Osprey title