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eBook Macbeth: High King of Scotland 1040-1057 ePub

eBook Macbeth: High King of Scotland 1040-1057 ePub

by Peter Berresford Ellis

  • ISBN: 0856404489
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Peter Berresford Ellis
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Blackstaff Pr (June 1, 1991)
  • Pages: 152
  • ePub book: 1257 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1690 kb
  • Other: docx lrf rtf lit
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 648

Description

This is the true story of Macbeth ("Macbeth" is the Anglicized version of his name, the Scots were thoroughly Celtic at the time), the Scottish line of kings, their interactions and wars with the Nordic kingdoms established in Scotland.

This is the true story of Macbeth ("Macbeth" is the Anglicized version of his name, the Scots were thoroughly Celtic at the time), the Scottish line of kings, their interactions and wars with the Nordic kingdoms established in Scotland and with various traitorous relatives in the royal line, who were all competing for the position of High King of Scotland and the power. Regardless of what power a person wanted, the Celtic code of hospitality forbids harming a guest in one's house - so Duncan would never have been murdered in Macbeth's own home. This would have guaranteed that Macbeth would never, ever have become High King - Scottish society would not have allowed it.

A great book about Macbeth: High King of Scotland 1040-1057. Peter Berresford Ellis (born 10 March 1943) is a historian, literary biographer, and novelist who has published over 90 books to date either under his own name or his pseudonyms Peter Tremayne and Peter MacAlan. He has also published 95 short stories. His non-fiction books, articles and academic papers have made him acknowledged as an authority on Celtic history and culture.

Macbeth (Medieval Gaelic: Mac Bethad mac Findlaích; Modern Gaelic: MacBheatha mac Fhionnlaigh; nicknamed Rí Deircc, "the Red King"; c. 1005 – 15 August 1057) was King of Scots from 1040 until his death. He ruled over only a portion of present-day Scotland

by Peter Berresford Ellis. A great book about Macbeth: High King of Scotland 1040-1057.

by Peter Berresford Ellis.

Peter Berresford Ellis. ISBN 10: 0584104642 ISBN 13: 9780584104646. Publisher: F. Muller, 1980.

Mac Bethad mac Findlaich, popularly known as Macbeth (c. 1005-1057) was a great Scottish king who is widely believed to have been born around 1005 in the ancient Scottish province of Celtic. He held the title ‘Mormaer’, which translates as a type of high steward. Are you sure you want to remove MacBeth, High King of Scotland, 1040-57 AD from your list?

Peter Berresford Ellis. MacBeth, High King of Scotland, 1040-57 AD Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove MacBeth, High King of Scotland, 1040-57 AD from your list? MacBeth, High King of Scotland, 1040-57 AD. by Peter Berresford Ellis. Published 1980 by F. Muller in London.

Author and Celtic scholar Peter Berresford Ellis was born in Coventry, Warwickshire, England on March 10, 1943. Even though he received a BA and an MA in Celtic Studies, he decided to become a journalist and worked at numerous weekly newspapers throughout England and Ireland. In 1968, he published is first book Wales - A Nation Again about the Welsh struggle for political independence.

Macbeth: High King of Scotland 1040-1057. Coauthors & Alternates. Peter Beresford-Ellis. ISBN 9781566192996 (978-1-56619-299-6) Hardcover, Barnes & Noble Inc, 1998. Find signed collectible books: 'Macbeth: High King of Scotland 1040-1057'.

Author and Celtic scholar Peter Berresford Ellis was born in Coventry, Warwickshire, England on March 10. .

Comments

caif caif
I was pleased to learn the true story of MacBeth as I have been tracking the descendants of the Great Brian Boru of Ireland, MacBeth being his great grandson. I am not surprised that MacBeth was a great man, being descended from both Kenneth McAlpin and Brian Boru. It is unfortunate that Shakespeare's story of MacBeth painted such an inaccurate portrait of the man, but I am sure he had to bend to the politics of his day.
Mayno Mayno
Okay, first, forget EVERYTHING Shakespeare ever said about Macbeth in his play. Forget the witches, forget the "prophesies", forget the alleged assassination of King Duncan in his bed while he was visiting Macbeth's home, forget Lady Macbeth wandering around in the night.

It is all a lie.

Shakespeare towed the accepted political line when he wrote his play. He went with the slanderous 1587 publication "Holinshed's Chronicles", a history of England, Scotland, and Ireland which was primarily revisionist history (likely designed to discredit the Scottish claims to the throne of England, as the Stuarts of Scotland were fighting the Tudors [Henry VIII & Elizabeth I] at the time).

This is the true story of Macbeth ("Macbeth" is the Anglicized version of his name, the Scots were thoroughly Celtic at the time), the Scottish line of kings, their interactions and wars with the Nordic kingdoms established in Scotland and with various traitorous relatives in the royal line, who were all competing for the position of High King of Scotland and the power that came with it.

Regardless of what power a person wanted, the Celtic code of hospitality forbids harming a guest in one's house - so Duncan would never have been murdered in Macbeth's own home. This would have guaranteed that Macbeth would never, ever have become High King - Scottish society would not have allowed it. Macbeth would have honorably go to war against Duncan to settle their differences. This is exactly what happened, and Macbeth succeeded to the throne with little objection from the Scottish nobles, after Duncan was killed in a battle against Macbeth and his Moray army. (There were a LOT of wars in Scotland in that era.)

It's a slim book, but contains a lot of information. It's very readable, and you'll find yourself constantly referring to the family tree in the front of the book and the hand-drawn maps (although I would have liked a few more maps, and a modern map reference, too). Anyone interested in real Scottish history should read this.