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eBook Medieval Ireland: The Enduring Tradition (New studies in medieval history) ePub

eBook Medieval Ireland: The Enduring Tradition (New studies in medieval history) ePub

by Brian Stone,Adrian Keogh,Michael Richter

  • ISBN: 0333452704
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Brian Stone,Adrian Keogh,Michael Richter
  • Language: English German
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 1st Edition edition (October 27, 1988)
  • Pages: 228
  • ePub book: 1779 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1597 kb
  • Other: mbr doc azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 839

Description

A brief book, Medieval Ireland still manages to cover all that one would expect it to, particularly as it relates to the influence of and on Christianity by the Irish (certianly a book on the . The book is a brief history of medieval Ireland.

A brief book, Medieval Ireland still manages to cover all that one would expect it to, particularly as it relates to the influence of and on Christianity by the Irish (certianly a book on the history of Ireland cannot skip Colum Cille, Patrick, and the traditions that lead to famous illuminated manuscripts like the Book of Kells). It covers the times from the prehistoric times to the fifteenth century. However, brief does not mean superficial.

Similar books and articles. Medieval Ireland: The Enduring Tradition The Formation of the Medieval West: Studies in the Oral Culture of the Barbarians. Karl Morrison - 1996 - Speculum 71 (4):1007-1010. Medieval Ireland: The Enduring Tradition. Michael Richter, Próinséas Ní Chatháin. The Formation of the Medieval West: Studies in the Oral Culture of the Barbarians. The Sun's Night Journey: A Pharaonic Image in Medieval Ireland. John Carey - 1994 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 57:14-34. Tradition, Rationality, and Moral Life : Medieval Judaism's Insight. Jonathan Jacobs - 2011 - In Judaic Sources and Western Thought: Jerusalem's Enduring Presence. Oxford University Press.

Medieval Ireland book. Start by marking Medieval Ireland: The Enduring Tradition (New Gill History of Ireland) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Irish history has traditionally been described either in isolation or in the manner in which it was influenced by outside forces, especially by England. This book strikes a different balance. First, the time span covered is longer than usual, and more attention is paid to the early medieval centuries than to the later period.

New Studies in Medieval History was a series of undergraduate level books on medieval history published by Macmillan between 1973 and the mid-1990s.

Medieval Ireland – The Enduring Tradition, the first instalment in the New Gill History of Ireland series, offers an overview of Irish history from the coming of Christianity in the fifth century to the Reformation in the sixteenth.

For all the complexity of political developments, Irish society remained basically stable and managed to withstand the onslaught of both the Vikings and the English.

Includes bibliographical references and indexes.

Michael Richter taught medieval history at University College Dublin and the University of Konstanz, Germany. He published a number of works on the medieval period, including Medieval Ireland, Ireland and her Neighbours in the Seventh Century and Bobbio in the early Middle Ages.

A Journal of Medieval Studies. Doing Things beside Domesday Book. Artificial Paleography: Computational Approaches to Identifying Script Types in Medieval Manuscripts. Volume 65, Number 2 Ap. 1990. The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis. The Digital Middle Ages: An Introduction. Kestemont et al. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

Medieval Ireland: The Enduring Tradition is an overview of Irish society from the coming of Christianity in the fourth century to the Reformation in the sixteenth. Such a broad survey reveals features otherwise not easily detected. For all the complexity of political developments, Irish society remained basically stable and managed to withstand the onslaught of both the Vikings and the English. The inherent strength of Ireland consisted in the cultural heritage from pre-historic times, which remained influential throughout the centuries discussed here.

Irish Medieval History, Gaillimh, Galway, Ireland. Its publication has led to a renaissance in early Irish legal studies (in which Irish, British, continental European and American scholars are involved). Donnchadh Ó Corráin (RIIP), former Director of CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts. Journal of the Medieval Academy of Ireland. University College Cork, Ireland. D. A. Binchy was the uncle of the Irish author Maeve Binchy and her brother William Binchy, a former Regius Professor of Laws at Trinity College, Dublin.

An essay on medieval Irish society, from the coming of Christianity in the fourth century to the Reformation of the 16th century. It examines the influence of cultural, religious and political developments on Irish society and also traces the roots of Irish literature.

Comments

Bulace Bulace
A brief book, Medieval Ireland still manages to cover all that one would expect it to, particularly as it relates to the
influence of and on Christianity by the Irish (certianly a book on the history of Ireland cannot skip Colum Cille, Patrick, and
the traditions that lead to famous illuminated manuscripts like the Book of Kells). I much appreciated the books treatment of
the effect Ireland had on, and the consequences of that influence on, continental Europe, Latin (as a language), and
Christianity (especially monasticism). In the sections covering these topics, the book is a delight to read and tells a
fascinating story.

The political organization sections were a harder, though no less informative, slog. I think this is not necessarily a fault of
the book, though, and is more tied to the (appropriate) use of proper people and place names. The pronunciation guide in the
back of the book on Gaelic words is of little help to 'the layman' picking up this book out of curiosity in Irish history. In
addition, Ireland had a quite complicated political makeup, as evidenced in several of the maps in the book. A few important
families come up constantly, but the sheer volume of major and minor rulers in the island's history certainly keeps the reader
on his toes!

This book is well worth the time for anyone curious about Ireland and its influence on Europe during the Middle Ages. It is
concise and enjoyable.
Cordanara Cordanara
Great book.
Peles Peles
Great
Kupidon Kupidon
Excellent, improved on what I knew about Ireland and the outside influences and why they've kept up the fight for so long (courage extrodinare). God Bless their cause of securing freedom from the "strangers."
Malarad Malarad
I purchased this book as a Christmas gift for my Irish son-in-law. I was shocked, surprised, and embarrassed when I discovered it is a PAPERBACK book. It never occured to me that a $40 book would not be a hardback, properly bound book worth keeping.
Teonyo Teonyo
The book is a brief history of medieval Ireland. It covers the times from the prehistoric times to the fifteenth century. However, brief does not mean superficial. The author chooses some subjects he is interested in and discusses them trying to be impartial - from many different points of view. He does not try to describe the past in detail, but rather to point out the most important moments, problems and aspects in Irish history. Richter also poses some questions significant from the point of view of a contemporary person some of which remain open.
The book is suitable for beginners as it is quite short and written in a comprehensible way as well as for people truly interested in the matter thanks to reliable bibliography record and references. It helps to understand the unusual political organization and the complicated and quite uncommon social structure of the Island in the middle ages. Obviously, history of medieval Ireland was greatly determined by the history of church, that is why the book deals mainly with the church's history, which was not less interesting in Ireland than political history. It is a very good book for a great start.