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eBook Death Or Glory: The Legacy Of The Crimean War ePub

eBook Death Or Glory: The Legacy Of The Crimean War ePub

by Robert Edgerton

  • ISBN: 0813335701
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Robert Edgerton
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books (March 25, 1999)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1406 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1643 kb
  • Other: azw txt txt lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 295

Description

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

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In 1853, the Crimean War began as an intensely romantic affair, with officers and soldiers alike taking to the fray with phrases like death or glory on their tongues and in their hearts

In 1853, the Crimean War began as an intensely romantic affair, with officers and soldiers alike taking to the fray with phrases like death or glory on their tongues and in their hearts. Nothing stands out more starkly than the toughness of the soldiers who fought so savagely, seldom complained, and only rarely collapsed under war’s terrible and relentless stresses. Edgerton paints a vivid picture of the war, from the Charge of the Light Brigade and the heroics of Florence Nightingale to the British soldiers who, simply unable to take the misery, starvation, and cholera any longer, took their own lives.

In 1853, the Crimean War began as an intensely romantic affair. Death or Glory is a narrative immersion into conditions during what became arguably the most tragically botched military campaign in modern European history.

Edgerton paints a vivid picture of the war, from the Charge of the Light Brigade and the heroics of Florence Nightingale to the British . The Legacy o the Crimean War. Westview Press A hlcxnbcr of thc Pcrsccts Books Group. fjrinred in the United States of America.

Edgerton paints a vivid picture of the war, from the Charge of the Light Brigade and the heroics of Florence Nightingale to the British soldiers who, simply unable to take the misery, starvation, and cholera any longer, took their own lives. He describes how leaders failed their men again and again; how women and children became unseen heroes; how the universally despised Turks fought their own war; and, finally and perhaps most importantly, why so many fought so bravely in what seemed a futile cause.

In 1853, the Crimean War began as an intensely romantic affair, with officers and soldiers alike taking to the fray with phrases like death or glory on their tongues and in. .has been added to your Cart.

In 1853, the Crimean War began as an intensely romantic affair, with officers and soldiers alike taking to the fray with phrases like death or glory on their tongues and in their hearts. Nothing stands out more starkly than the toughness of the soldiers who fought so savagely.

Edgerton attempts a sociocultural analysis of the Crimea and falls flat on his face

In 1853, the Crimean War began as an intensely romantic affair, with. Edgerton attempts a sociocultural analysis of the Crimea and falls flat on his face. In fairness, he illuminates some oft-neglected aspects of the war: Turkey's role in the conflict, women on the front lines, the ever present scourge of disease. But his structure is nonsensical, his political/strategic analysis crude, his battle narratives sloppy and ill-informed. For one, could Lord Lucan really have arrested Captain Nolan (aide-de-camp to his superior The worst Crimean War history I've read.

Death or Glory is not a mere battle chronology; rather, it is a narrative immersion into conditions during what became arguably the most tragically botched military campaign, from all sides, in modern European history—and the most immediate precedent to the American Civil War.

By Robert B. Edgerton. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1999.

In 1853, the Crimean War began as an intensely romantic affair, with officers and soldiers alike taking to the fray with phrases like “death or glory” on their tongues and in their hearts. Nothing stands out more starkly than the toughness of the soldiers who fought so savagely, seldom complained, and only rarely collapsed under war's terrible and relentless stresses. Acts of astonishing bravery, many of them by doctors, women, and children, were commonplace. But so was callousness and brutality. The war soon became an impersonal, long-range killing match that resembled, far in advance, the trench warfare of World War I. It became a showcase for bad generalship and bureaucratic bungling. Men, women, and children died of hunger, cold, and disease many times more often than they were killed by rifles or the most massive artillery barrages the world have ever seen. Death or Glory is not a mere battle chronology; rather, it is a narrative immersion into conditions during what became arguably the most tragically botched military campaign, from all sides, in modern European history—and the most immediate precedent to the American Civil War. Edgerton paints a vivid picture of the war, from the Charge of the Light Brigade and the heroics of Florence Nightingale to the British soldiers who, simply unable to take the misery, starvation, and cholera any longer, took their own lives. He describes how leaders failed their men again and again; how women and children became unseen heroes; how the universally despised Turks fought their own war; and, finally and perhaps most importantly, why so many fought so bravely in what seemed a futile cause. By comparing these experiences with those of Northern and Southern soldiers during the more well-documented American Civil War, Edgerton contributes a new perspective on how soldiers in the mid-19th century experienced war, death, and glory.

Comments

MegaStar MegaStar
A rather disjointed recounting of the gore and hazards of war. It seems that the legacy was not covered as well as what begat the legacy. Could have been a little more organized. Some interesting facts were included but read like a rehash of known information.
Ubrise Ubrise
I think the sub-title, "The Legacy of the Crimean War" is misleading. The book is a straight-forward description of various aspects of the war - the atrocious medical services, generalship, condition of the armies, and so on. It does not get into the legacy of the war and how the armies adapted afterwards as a result of the war. The sources in the bibliography are strictly secondary; no original scholarship is evident. All in all, it's a pretty light-weight book. Since it was published in 1999, you could probably find betters ones out now.
Yalone Yalone
This was an OK read. I learned something about the Crimean War. Although I am no expert, the first review seems rather harsh. I enjoyed the book for the view from the Ottoman, Russian, French, and British perspective. I think the author does justice to all sides. The Civil War examples are out of context when one is reading about the Crimean War. The author was trying to do a comparison, but it didn't appeal to me. I read the author's previous book about the African Gold Coast (Ghana) and I found that a better read. This book is a good overview of this war.

An average read about the Crimean War. This is an interesting book from a different perspective.
Mohn Mohn
This vivid description of the Crimean War could have prevented the American Civil War. The Crimean war was modern
battle at its worst. It's not pure history. But, an excellent read nevertheless. It remains one of the most riveting
books on the war. The writing is excellent. His interweaving the Crimean War and the Civil War provides a different but
refreshing analysis. This book should be reissued on this 150th anniversary of the Civil War. So few pople know about the
events in the Crimea that foretold the slaughter of the Civil War and WWI. Oh, why didn't they learn. Buy it and read it.
Quttaro Quttaro
Edgerton's book about the Crimean War does not just cover the battles. It covers the British society of that time who thought a war would be a fine thing because they hadn't had one in 40 years. It covers the stupidity of the British high command, both on the spot and in Britain, and the suffering that this stupidity caused those fine British soldiers who did their duty. Kipling would approve of this book.