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eBook Boswell's London Journal, 1762-1763 ePub

eBook Boswell's London Journal, 1762-1763 ePub

by Frederick A. Pottle,James Boswell

  • ISBN: 0300093012
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Frederick A. Pottle,James Boswell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; 2nd ed. edition (May 10, 2004)
  • Pages: 412
  • ePub book: 1265 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1882 kb
  • Other: lrf lit mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 766

Description

James Boswell's London Journal is a published version of the daily journal he kept between the years 1762 and 1763 while in London.

James Boswell's London Journal is a published version of the daily journal he kept between the years 1762 and 1763 while in London. In it, Boswell, then a young Scotsman of 22, visits London for his second time.

In 1762 James Boswell, then twenty-two years old, left Edinburgh for London. Frank and confessional as a personal portrait of the young Boswell, the Journal is also revealing as a vivid portrayal of life in eighteenth-century London. Peter Ackroyd is the author of London: The Biography, The Life of Thomas More, Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination, and many other books.

Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). Boswell relates the life of a young man living on a small allowance in London while freely sharing his thoughts and ambitions to be a man of the world. Reading his constant self-exhortations to behave with more dignity and gravitas is a delight. Boswell is a very likable young man who often behaves with compassion and always with self-awareness.

No celebrant of the London world can ignore his book

Paperback 384 Pages, Published: 11/08/2004. No celebrant of the London world can ignore his book. Peter Ackroyd, from the Foreword In 1762 James Boswell, then twenty-two years old, left Edinburgh for London.

London Journal, 1762-1763 book. In 1762 James Boswell, then twenty-two years old, left Edinburgh for London.

London Journal, 1762-1763. Ed. Frederick A. Pottle. Repr: Harmodsworth: Penguin, 1966. Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure. London: Mayflower, 1964. 102. 53 John D’Emilio, and Estelle B. Freedman, Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America ( New York: Harper & Row, 1988); Robert M. Isherwood, Farce and Fantasy: Popular Entertainment in Eighteenth-Century Paris (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986). 54 Roy Porter, ‘Material Pleasures in the Consumer Society’, in Porter & Roberts, Pleasure in the Eighteenth Century, 27-29.

com: Boswell's London Journal 1762-1763: A blue, cloth hardback, with a pictorial dustjacket. James Boswell was a prolific writer, and diarist, best known for his biographies of his great friend, Samuel Johnson. This is the journal he wrote when he was twenty-two and first came to London. It includes a visit to a public execution, a cock-fight and his first, fatefulmeeting with Samuel Johnson. Condition: The binding is tight and firm with the boards and all internal pages.

Now first published from the original manuscript prepared for the press, with introduction and notes by Frederick A. With a preface by Christopher Morley. In very good condition. Book ships from New Brunswick, Canada. Can send photos upon request. With a preface by Christo. Shows small signs of shelf wear and use. Hardcover: 370 pages Publisher: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc. 1950 A11.

Boswell’s London Journal, 1762-1763. No celebrant of the London world can ignore this book. From Peter Ackroyd’s foreword: ‘So here he is, breakfasting, singing catches, drinking tea, walking in the park, visiting cockfights, playing billiards, walking around Mrs Salmon’s waxworks, attending church, seeing a public hanging, visiting Newgate, disputing with Samuel Johnson and a host of other Londoners.

Boswell, James, 1740-1795; Pottle, Frederick A. (Frederick Albert), 1897-1987, e. (Frederick Albert), 1897-1987, ed. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In 1762 James Boswell, then twenty-two years old, left Edinburgh for London. The famous Journal he kept during the next nine months is an intimate account of his encounters with the high-life and the low-life in London. Frank and confessional as a personal portrait of the young Boswell, the Journal is also revealing as a vivid portrayal of life in eighteenth-century London. This new edition includes an introduction by Peter Ackroyd, which discusses Boswell’s life and achievement.

“Boswell was the most charming companion in the world, and London becomes his dining-room and his playground, his club and his confessional. No celebrant of the London world can ignore his book.”—Peter Ackroyd, from the introduction

 

“Boswell was the most charming companion in the world, and London becomes his dining-room and his playground, his club and his confessional. No celebrant of the London world can ignore his book.”—Peter Ackroyd, from the Introduction

 

Praise for the earlier edition:

"[The journal is] more perceptive and uninhibited and magically alive than one could have hoped. . . . Boswell transforms the most trifling occurrences into adventures, and imparts to the reader his own surpassing lust for experience and his keen sense of the fascination of life."—Austin Wright, Virginia Quarterly Review

 

"The journal is admirably edited and annotated.”—W. H. Auden, New Yorker

 

The late Frederick Pottle, Sterling Professor of English Emeritus at Yale University, was editor, bibliographer, and biographer of James Boswell. Peter Ackroyd is the author of London: The Biography, The Life of Thomas More, Albion: The Origins of the English Imagination, and many other books.

 

Comments

Hanad Hanad
But overall pretty interesting and entertaining diary of a vain and amorous young man in London in the eighteenth century. He is quite explicit about his sexual encounters, his bouts with venereal diseases, the women he engages with, etc. but it is also a good reference for the cost of living, the clothing of the era, the food and meals, which he describes in great detail and in general, the life of a somewhat idle but ambitious fellow. Also politics come into play as almost everything of the day was political. Worth reading if you have an interest in the era.
Burking Burking
James Boswell, 22 years old, leaves his home in Scotland to live the city life in London. He records his adventures and thoughts in this journal which has been wonderfully edited and annotated by Frederick Pottle. Boswell relates the life of a young man living on a small allowance in London while freely sharing his thoughts and ambitions to be a man of the world. Reading his constant self-exhortations to behave with more dignity and gravitas is a delight. Boswell is a very likable young man who often behaves with compassion and always with self-awareness. I am so glad to have the opportunity to learn about and share his world.
Saberdragon Saberdragon
Daily life in London in the early 1760s comes to life in this journal, in which Boswell is already experimenting with detailed narrative and dramatized dialogue, elements that made his "Life of Johnson" the world-class model of biography. From coffee house conversations to cockfights to intrigues with women, what's not to like? And you can't do better than Frederick Pottle as an editor. His introduction is most helpful, too. You don't need to be an expert on the 18th century to enjoy this book!
Sirara Sirara
Scotsman of high ideals and weak moral fibre spends several months in London crashing dinner parties, schmoozing aristocrats, nailing hookers, getting the clap. (Quote of the book: "She is in all probability a most consummate dissembling whore.") Resolves to change his ways. Doesn't. Writes lots of nasty things about various fifteen-minuters of his day and also meets a few bona fide intellectual lights like Johnson. This book is a salacious page-turner, beautifully written by a young man with an indiscriminate penis but a discerning eye for character. Highly recommended for those interested in Georgian England, but even more highly recommended for horny teenage boys daunted by summer reading lists: it offers a good dose of smut but you get credit for reading a Classic.
Dalallador Dalallador
Superb, fun, instructive, saucy. Boswell's misadventures in London at the age of 22-23, as he attempted to launch his ambitious professional, intellectual and amorous careers, to the distress of his moderate, virtuous father. Give to any kid about to graduate from college.
Asher Asher
A good book with very descriptive narratives of life in London back in the 18th century. Much of the book are anecdotes of Boswell's intrapersonal relationships with those he interacts with on a daily basis. It's like reading a friend's diary. Some entries were probably never meant to go public. I liked it.
Adorardana Adorardana
Delivered as advertised.
Poor modern time, that was the time of , back then, of syphilis and the kind -petite verole - grande verole- that was not easily cured- BUT human lust is greater than life saving measure-re member AIDS?

Now it is not only about sex ( yes a lot ) but also about like Jules Renard wrote his every day life- here life in London---

You are in your flat open the door and..Flash----you are a witness, even better- a part of it.