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eBook Bitter Glory: Poland  Its Fate 1918-1939 ePub

eBook Bitter Glory: Poland Its Fate 1918-1939 ePub

by Richard M. Watt

  • ISBN: 0781806739
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Richard M. Watt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hippocrene Books; 3rd Edition edition (December 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 511
  • ePub book: 1284 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1502 kb
  • Other: docx doc txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 987

Description

Watt tells the story of the painful birth, tormented life, and cataclysmic death of the independent Poland of 1918-1939. His 460 page book delves in great detail into the creation of modern Poland in the crumbling empires of World War I, through the Fourth Partition of 1939.

Watt tells the story of the painful birth, tormented life, and cataclysmic death of the independent Poland of 1918-1939. Watt does a very good job of exploring Poland's & as he calls it, from the inside out, and expertly sets this amidst the backdrop of European politics in the period inter bella.

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Bitter Glory: Poland and its fate 1918-1939. by Richard M. Watt (1982)Details of an intense, brief, and pivotal period in Poland's independence. Watt does a very good job of exploring Poland's & as he calls it, from the inside out, and expertly sets this amidst the backdrop of European politics in the period inter bella

Watt tells the story of the painful birth, tormented life, and cataclysmic death of the independent Poland of 1918-1939. This book was very complimentary to Pilsudski, portraying him as the glue that held the nation together whereas the other political parties used power to enrich themselves.

This book was very complimentary to Pilsudski, portraying him as the glue that held the nation together whereas the other political parties used power to enrich themselves. For those interested in Polish history, this is a must read.

I've just recieved "Bitter Glory: Poland & Its Fate 1918-1939" by Richard M. Watt and it looks very promising. Has anyone of you read it? /Marcus. It sounds like this would be an excellent book to go with Richard's excellent forthcoming 'Blitzkrieg Unleashed'.

oceedings{Watt1982BitterGA, title {Bitter Glory:Poland and its Fate, 1918-1939}, author {Richard M. .Watt tells the story of the painful birth, tormented life, and cataclysmic death of the independent Poland of 1918-1939. Watt}, year {1982} }. Richard M. Watt.

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Poland re-emerged in November 1918 after more than a century of partitions by Austria-Hungary, the German, and the Russian Empires. Watt, Bitter Glory: Poland and its Fate, 1918-1939 (1982), pp. 175-9, 248-64

Poland re-emerged in November 1918 after more than a century of partitions by Austria-Hungary, the German, and the Russian Empires. 175-9, 248-64. Halik Kochanski, The Eagle Unbowed: Poland and the Poles in the Second World War (2012) pp. 34-58. a b Anna M. Cienciala (1968).

Watt tells the story of the painful birth, tormented life, and cataclysmic death of the independent Poland of 1918--1939. He also gives the definitive account in English of the dominant figure in this story, the Polish freedom fighter and strongman Jozef Pilsudski, whose admirers included Poland's Jews and Adolf Hitler.

Comments

Adrierdin Adrierdin
A MUST for any fan of, history, WWII, Polish history and/or european history.
An excellent book.
lacki lacki
Excellent book and service. Got here in plenty of time for Xmas (was a gift-I originally read it at Cleveland library). Book was in very good condition. One cannot understand WWII and it's lead-up without reading it or something like it. If Jozef Pilsudski hadn't died in 1935 I doubt that World War II would have been a world war.
Fegelv Fegelv
Bitter Glory: Poland and its Fate 1918-1939

Richard M. Watt wrote "Dare Call It Treason" about the mutinies in the French Army in 1917 and "The Kings Depart" about the German Revolution of 1918-1919. This book is a history of Poland from 1918 to 1939. Poland had once been an enormous and powerful nation stretching from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea, and second only to France in population (p.16). Lacking natural frontiers like mountains and major rivers it was frequently invaded in wars. Its aristocracy was huge and quarrelsome, and elected the Polish king. The wars in the mid-17th century caused a 25% loss of population (p.17) and led to a decline. Poland was partitioned between Prussia, Austria, and Russia (p.18). Patriots sought a new Constitution in 1791 but Russia invaded for the Second Partition. There was a new war in 1794 but the defeat led to the Third Partition and an end to Poland (p.19). Thomas Jefferson and others spoke out against this. Emigré Poles formed the Polish Legions of Napoleon and this led to the creation of the "Grand Duchy of Warsaw". The Congress of Vienna created a small Kingdom of Poland (p.20). The revolts of 1830 and 1863 were unsuccessful and ended this Kingdom (p.21).

Both Russia and Prussia began a culture war to de-Polonize the population (p.22). This strengthened national consciousness (p.23). Austria allowed its peoples their nationalist sentiments and had few problems (p.24). A population explosion in Poland led to emigration, mostly to America. The united Polish Socialist Party was formed to work for independence (p.25), but split into factions (p.26). One man stood out as a leader (p.27). Józef Pilsudski believed that Polish independence could only result from a general European war where Germany and Austria defeated Russia and were beaten by France (p.39). It seemed fantastic. The National Democratic Party were political opponents (pp.40-42). The Great War began in August 1914 (Chapter 2) and led to Polish independence (Wilson's 13th point). But the question of boundaries remained. France wanted an ally in Russia, but the Bolshevik Revolution changed that. Instead they wanted an alliance with the countries west of Russia. [No thought of an independent Bavaria and Rhineland?] A great Poland would be stronger but contain minority peoples who wished to be part of a neighboring country (p.71).

The new nation had many problems (Chapter 4). The Polish-Soviet War (1919-1920) was over the eastern boundary of Poland (Chapter 5). Pilsudski wanted an independent Lithuania, Ukraine, and Belorussia allied to Poland (p.93). Poland's eastern border was settled (Chapters 6,7). Chapter 8 discusses politics. Chapter 9 tells about the economic devastation caused by the war and afterwards. Pilsudski's coup succeeded because of support from workers (Chapter 10). Economic conditions improved by chance (p.245). Pilsudski became more autocratic (Chapter 12). The Great Depression arrived in early 1929 (Chapter 13). Every class suffered (p.295). Insolvent industries were taken over by the government (p.297). Pilsudski was in control of Poland (Chapter 14). What happens when an autocrat dies (Chapter 15)? Would a replacement be given too much power (p.351)? A man who inherits a position is not as good as the man who earned it (Chapter 16). Poland depended on its treaties with France and Rumania and would not consider any alliance with Germany or the Soviet Union (Chapter 17). The military occupation of the Rhineland showed German intentions (p.372). Poland chose to fight rather than submit to Hitler (p.396). They expected France to attack when war began (pp.401-402). The Soviet-German Nonaggression Pact surprised the world (p.408). Chapter 18 describes the short war. The Blitzkrieg offensive worked (p.418). Armored tanks destroyed artillery (p.423). It was over in 20 days (p.441). Poland was only partially mobilized. The `Afterword' summarizes the later events.
Tyler Is Not Here Tyler Is Not Here
Bitter Glory

Richard M. Watt wrote "Dare Call It Treason" about the mutinies in the French Army in 1917 and "The Kings Depart" about the German Revolution of 1918-1919. This book is a history of Poland from 1918 to 1939. Poland had once been an enormous and powerful nation stretching from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea, and second only to France in population (p.16). Lacking natural frontiers like mountains and major rivers it was frequently invaded in wars. Its aristocracy was huge and quarrelsome, and elected the Polish king. The wars in the mid 17th century caused a 25% loss of population (p.17) and led to a decline. Poland was partitioned between Prussia, Austria, and Russia (p.18). Patriots sought a new Constitution in 1791 but Russia invaded for the Second Partition. There was a new war in 1794 but the defeat led to the Third Partition and an end to Poland (p.19). Thomas Jefferson and others spoke out against this. Emigré Poles formed the Polish Legions of Napoleon and this led to the creation of the "Grand Duchy of Warsaw". The Congress of Vienna created a small Kingdom of Poland (p.20). The revolts of 1830 and 1863 were unsuccessful and ended this Kingdom (p.21).

Both Russia and Prussia began a culture war to de-Polonize the population (p.22). This strengthened national consciousness (p.23). Austria allowed its peoples their nationalist sentiments and had few problems (p.24). A population explosion in Poland led to emigration, mostly to America. The united Polish Socialist Party was formed to work for independence (p.25), but split into factions (p.26). One man stood out as a leader (p.27). Józef Pilsudski believed that Polish independence could only result from a general European war where Germany and Austria defeated Russia and were beaten by France (p.39). It seemed fantastic. The National Democratic Party were political opponents (pp.40-42). The Great War began in August 1914 (Chapter 2) and led to Polish independence (Wilson's 13th point). But the question of boundaries remained. France wanted an ally in Russia, but the Bolshevik Revolution changed that. Instead they wanted an alliance with the countries west of Russia. [No thought of an independent Bavaria and Rhineland?] A great Poland would be stronger but contain minority peoples who wished to be part of a neighboring country (p.71).

The new nation had many problems (Chapter 4). The Polish-Soviet War (1919-1920) was over the eastern boundary of Poland (Chapter 5). Pilsudski wanted an independent Lithuania, Ukraine, and Belorussia allied to Poland (p.93). Poland's eastern border was settled (Chapters 6,7). Chapter 8 discusses politics. Chapter 9 tells about the economic devastation caused by the war and afterwards. Pilsudski's coup succeeded because of support from workers (Chapter 10). Economic conditions improved by chance (p.245). Pilsudski became more autocratic (Chapter 12). The Great Depression arrived in early 1929 (Chapter 13). Every class suffered (p.295). Insolvent industries were taken over by the government (p.297). Pilsudski was in control of Poland (Chapter 14). What happens when an autocrat dies (Chapter 15)? Would a replacement be given too much power (p.351)? A man who inherits a position is not as good as the man who earned it (Chapter 16). Poland depended on its treaties with France and Rumania and would not consider any alliance with Germany or the Soviet Union (Chapter 17). The military occupation of the Rhineland showed German intentions (p.372). Poland chose to fight rather than submit to Hitler (p.396). They expected France to attack when war began (pp.401-402). The Soviet-German Nonaggression Pact surprised the world (p.408). Chapter 18 describes the short war. The Blitzkrieg offensive worked (p.418). Armored tanks destroyed artillery (p.423). It was over in 20 days (p.441). Poland was only partially mobilized. The `Afterword' summarizes the later events.