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eBook England's Maritime Empire: Seapower, Commerce and Policy, 1490-1690 (Turning Points) ePub

eBook England's Maritime Empire: Seapower, Commerce and Policy, 1490-1690 (Turning Points) ePub

by David M. Loades

  • ISBN: 0582356296
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: David M. Loades
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Longman Pub Group (September 1, 2000)
  • Pages: 277
  • ePub book: 1154 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1922 kb
  • Other: lit txt mobi doc
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 827

Description

David Loades, one of the leading historians of the Tudor and Stuart period, has written an ambitious new study, England's Maritime Empire, which looks at England's rise as a great maritime power during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries Explores the development of Tudor.

David Loades, one of the leading historians of the Tudor and Stuart period, has written an ambitious new study, England's Maritime Empire, which looks at England's rise as a great maritime power during the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries Explores the development of Tudor maritime policy and considers several important themes including the Maritime revolution, 1550-1558, the Commonwealth and naval. policy, the restoration navy and later 17th century colonial expansion. Those interested in British or naval history.

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England's Maritime Empire : Seapower, Commerce and Policy 1490-1690. Loades considers the development of Tudor maritime policy and shows how there was a crucial turning point when English government began to take a proactive role in the commercial fortunes of the country.

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Loades, David M. England's Maritime Empire: Seapower.

ISBN 13: 9780582356290. England's Maritime Empire: Seapower, Commerce and Policy, 1490-1690 (Turning Points).

Power in Tudor England (Macmillan, 1997). England’s Maritime Empire: Seapower, Commerce and Policy, 1490–1690 (Longmans, 2000). The Cecils: Privilege and Power behind the Throne (The National Archives, 2007). Elizabeth I (Hambledon Continuum, 2003). Elizabeth I: The Golden Reign of Gloriana (The National Archives, 2003). Intrigue and Treason: The Tudor Court 1547–1558 (Pearson Longmans, 2004). Mary Tudor: The Tragical History of the First Queen of England (The National Archives, 2006). Henry VIII: Court, Church and Conflict (The National Archives, 2007).

Loades considers the development of Tudor maritime policy and shows how there was a crucial turning point when .

Loades considers the development of Tudor maritime policy and shows how there was a crucial turning point when English government began to take a proactive role in the commercial fortunes of the country. The study considers other important themes including: The Maritime revolution 1550-1558 The Commonwealth and Naval Policy The Restoration Navy Later 17th Century Colonial Expansi. more).

Sir Francis Drake: The Queen's Pirate. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2000. England's Maritime Empire: Seapower, Commerce and Policy 1490-1690. Harlow and New York: Pearson Education Limited, 2000. For all its apparent credentials as a cool, detached synthesis of the development of English seapower between 1490 and 1690, David Loades, the leading authority on the Tudor navy, is also concerned very much with myths.

Find nearly any book by David M. Loades. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. England's Maritime Empire: Seapower, Commerce and Policy 1490-1690, Turning Points: ISBN 9780582356283 (978-0-582-35628-3) Softcover, Longman Pub Group, 2000.

This wide-ranging book spans the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and charts England's rise to international and colonial power. That rise was achieved, first through a growing awareness and then a conscious exploitation of England's powerful Atlantic situation and maritime potential.Medieval England had been the focus of a fluctuating land based empire which had embraced much of France, but Early Modern England turned away from such aspirations and began to create a new role through developing sea power. This spread throughout the world beyond Europe, and particularly to the New World across the Atlantic, driven by ambitions which were commercial and intellectual rather than religious or dynastic. Charting these developments, and the very origins of Empire, this book lays emphasises the increasing role of government; first in developing the navy, and then in deploying it to support commercial agression. It is an important contribution to the imperial and naval history of Early Modern Britain.