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eBook For All the Tea in China: How England Stole the World's Favorite Drink and Changed History ePub

eBook For All the Tea in China: How England Stole the World's Favorite Drink and Changed History ePub

by Sarah Rose

  • ISBN: 1400165377
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Sarah Rose
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (March 18, 2010)
  • ePub book: 1340 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1752 kb
  • Other: lrf lit doc rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 408

Description

The plot for Sarah Rose's For All the Tea in China seems tailor-made for a Hollywood thriller.

The plot for Sarah Rose's For All the Tea in China seems tailor-made for a Hollywood thriller. a story that should appeal to readers who want to be transported on a historic journey laced with suspense, science and adventure. An enthusiastic tale of how the humble leaf became a global addiction. a remarkably riveting tale.

Originally published: London : Hutchinson, 2009, with title For all the tea in China : espionage, empire, and the secret formula for the world's favourite drink. Bibliography, etc. Note: Includes bibliographical references (p. -254) and index.

For centuries, China had been the world's sole tea manufacturer. Stealing tea from China was a dangerous and criminal endeavour but Fortune was excited by the idea and agreed to do it. Sarah Rose focuses on an important, but somewhat obscure subplot of the history of the British imperialism in Asia - Scottish botanist Robert Fortune's employment by the East India Company to steal tea plants, as well as the relevant technologies and expertise, from the Chinese.

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A dramatic historical narrative of the man who stole the secret of tea from China. In 1848, the British East India Company, having lost its monopoly on the tea trade, engaged Robert Fortune, a Scottish gardener, botanist, and plant hunter, to make a clandestine trip into the interior of China-territory forbidden to foreigners-to steal the closely guarded secrets of tea horticulture and manufacturing.

If ever there was a book to read in the company of a nice cuppa, this is i. -The Washington Post In the . -The Washington Post In the dramatic story of one of the greatest acts of corporate espionage ever committed, Sarah Rose recounts the fascinating, unlikely circumstances surro. The Washington Post In the dramatic story of one of the greatest acts of corporate espionage ever committed, Sarah Rose recounts the fascinating, unlikely circumstances surrounding a turning point in economic history.

I was utterly fascinated at how unceremoniously Britain manage to steal the tea secrets from China. is an exceedingly useful plant; cultivate it, and the benefit will be widely spread; drink it, and the animal spirits will be lively and clear. Robert Fortune, quoting a Chinese proverb. I wonder how the world would be today if they did not succeed.

In 1848, the British East India Company, having lost its monopoly on the tea trade, engaged Robert Fortune, a Scottish gardener, botanist, and plant hunter, to make a clandestine trip into the interior of China-territory forbidden to foreigners-to steal the closely guarded secrets of tea horticulture and manufacturing. For All the Tea in China is the remarkable account of Fortune's journeys into China-a thrilling narrative that combines history, geography, botany, natural science, and old-fashioned adventure. Disguised in Mandarin robes, Fortune ventured deep into the country, confronting pirates, hostile climate, and his own untrustworthy men as he made his way to the epicenter of tea production, the remote Wu Yi Shan hills. One of the most daring acts of corporate espionage in history, Fortune's pursuit of China's ancient secret makes for a classic nineteenth-century adventure tale, one in which the fate of empires hinges on the feats of one extraordinary man.

Comments

ℓo√ﻉ ℓo√ﻉ
This is a history book. It uses a theme, the tea trade, to follow the cultivation and preparation of tea and its impact on countries and continents, politics and people. You will learn about the opium wars, the isolation and re-opening of China. It makes the horticulture and geography of China come alive and you will be amazed at the diversity and beauty of plants that originated in China.

Extremely well written, it is exciting, interesting and informative. All history books should be written this way, showing the interrelationships between cultures, economics, politics, agriculture, and commerce. It is understanding of how forces, individually and together, drive events that makes history come alive, makes it interesting and makes it relevant.

You will enjoy it and be possessed of new insights. You will also want to go out and buy some tea.
Skunk Black Skunk Black
For a fine-tea geek like myself, this book was enthralling. But even if that magic leaf is NOT your cup of tea, learning about the history of this rare commodity and its power in world economies is worth the read. Ms. Rose brings the career of Robert Fortune to life and illuminates the monopolistic power of the famous East India Company, tool of Britain's empire-building strategy. Rose reports history yet tells a story of living people set against a backdrop of culture clashes, espionage, political gamesmanship, and scientific discovery. Whether you're into tea, botany, sociology, history or just love a good page-turner, this book is for you. We learn that Fortune, a prominent British botanist, led the largest theft of intellectual property known to man: tea growing and processing secrets held closely by the Chinese. The social justice component is also an important theme running throughout the book. We learn of the intensive labor required to produce the teas that so captivated the upper classes of the time (and still captivate average people like myself). I even learned that American history books once again whitewashed the truth: those Chinese railroad laborers of the mid-1800s were actually victims of human trafficking; indentured servants at best, outright slave labor at worst. Despite all these harsh truths, Rose keeps the narrative both factual and interesting without crossing over into preaching. You cannot help but root for Fortune through all his failures and successes. The book is eye-opening and completely engrossing.
Hellblade Hellblade
After listening to some podcasts about tea, I became interested in the history. I really enjoyed this book, I think it is very well written and, it's very interesting to read how how tea spread around the world. These were the days of courageous botanists and travelers who made many discoveries.
Fortune's adventures and successes not only made tea spread around the world but at that time British gardeners could also suddenly enjoy the beautiful and exotic plants from other regions in the world. Fascinating to read about the influence of the East India company in the various regions around the world, and how this slowly changed. It gives you a lot of details and facts about the middle of the 19th century but is also reads like fiction. I love to see more from this author.
Best West Best West
I purchased this for a history book club. If you enjoy readable (meaning non academic ivory tower, infinitesimally detailed oriented garbage that doesn't go anywhere) you will enjoy this book. What a wild combination of Indiana Jones and pbs garden shows. Really interesting concepts tha I have not seen anywhere else in an eminently readable format. I keep saying readable, because so much history is well, not.
Venemarr Venemarr
A fascinating story, told in a less than fascinating fashion. The book suffers from a lack of good maps and helpful illustrations -- probably budget constraints set by the publisher and not by the well-meaning author.
Yojin Yojin
Delightful read for those of us addicted to tea and prone to enjoying history. I am not inclined to believe or disbelieve her reportage, but am inclined to enjoy her point of view. Her writing style is engaging and the bottom line from my experience is I am now passionate about finding more information about "The John Company," Mr. Fortune and the history of the East India Company from Elizabeth 1 forward. Now That's something!

The impact of such a simple thing as importing tea and the history and social impact are compelling, whether or not her dialogue or empathic comments are accurate. The net-net is, this is a good read. Other reviews critique the scholarly issues and miss the point entirely. This is a book about a frame of reference, of time and place, and the footnotes and accuracy of conversations are unimportant.

Methinks the reviewers who attack the book on scholarly grounds have no concept of the Journalistic license popularized, but not invented, by Truman Capote ["In Cold Blood"] in the non-fiction novel genre. [The non-fiction novel is a literary genre which, broadly speaking, depicts real historical figures and actual events narrated woven together with fictitious allegations and using the storytelling techniques of fiction. The non-fiction novel is an otherwise loosely-defined and flexible genre. The genre is sometimes referred to as or faction, a portmanteau of "fact" and "fiction".]

I only hope Ms. Rose has another book in the writing. I am thrilled with the doors opened to other historical adventures.
Swordsong Swordsong
I'm only half way through but this a wonderful book on so many levels: history, natural history, scientific history, economics, botany and not the least of all, a must for any tea lover. It reads like an adventure set in a time when botany and discovering new plants was the Internet and fortunes were made on "programing" the tea to grow in a new place. Plus, it's written like a historical novel of adventure full of rich characters and conflicts.

If you are a tea lover, you will love this book and it will give you many insights to the modern history of tea and clarify many things you may have wondered about. In passing it also explained the mysteries of now obscure and unused tea names like Bohea and Congou.