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eBook The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy ePub

eBook The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy ePub

by Jacob Burckhardt

  • ISBN: 0486475972
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Jacob Burckhardt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dover Publications (September 16, 2010)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1438 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1775 kb
  • Other: azw docx txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 971

Description

The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (German: Die Cultur der Renaissance in Italien) is an 1860 work on the Italian Renaissance by Swiss historian Jacob Burckhardt.

The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy (German: Die Cultur der Renaissance in Italien) is an 1860 work on the Italian Renaissance by Swiss historian Jacob Burckhardt. Together with his History of the Renaissance in Italy (Die Geschichte der Renaissance in Italien; 1867) it is counted among the classics of Renaissance historiography. An English translation was produced by . Middlemore in two volumes, London 1878

Jacob Burckhardt was born in 1818 in Basel, Switzerland. He studied history at the University of Berlin and taught art history and the Italian Renaissance in Berlin and Basel

Jacob Burckhardt was born in 1818 in Basel, Switzerland. He studied history at the University of Berlin and taught art history and the Italian Renaissance in Berlin and Basel. His essay, as he called The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy, was first published in 1860. Random House Publishing Group, 1 нояб.

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gaps in this book by a special work on the ’Art of the Renaissance’-an .

The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy by Jacob Burckhardt Project Gutenberg Etext Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy 1 The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy by Jacob Burckhardt Table of Contents Part One: The State as a Work of Art 1-1 Introduction 1-2 Despots of the Fourteenth Century 1-3 Despots of the Fifteenth Century 1-4 The Smaller. It was formerly our intention to fill up the gaps in this book by a special work on the ’Art of the Renaissance’-an intention, however, which we have been able to fulfill only in part.

For Burckhardt (who wrote & in the 1850s), the Italian Renaissance represented .

For Burckhardt (who wrote & in the 1850s), the Italian Renaissance represented the punctuated end of the middle ages and the beginning of the modern world. He placed particular emphasis on the idea that for the first time in history, the Renaissance gave us "individuality": the idea that a person could separate themselves from the crowd by their creative genius (in art, politics, science, et. Because for so long Burckhardt's 'Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy' defined what the Renaissance was, one must spend at least a little time with Burckhardt to understand current concepts of the Renaissance in any depth.

For Burckhardt (who wrote & in the 1850s), the Italian Renaissance represented the punctuated end of the middle ages . Jacob Burckhardt is one of the leading historians of the Renaissance in Italy. As such, some of his views are outdated and his style of writing is of that period.

Start by marking The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. For nineteenth-century Swiss historian Jacob Burckhardt, the Italian Renaissance was nothing less than the beginning of the modern world - a world in which flourishing individualism and the competition for fame radically transformed science, the arts, and politics.

DR It also contains some fresh matter communicated by Dr. Burckhardt to Professor Diego Valbusa of Mantua, the Italian translator of the book.

Burckhardt’s work on the Renaissance in Italy is too well known, not only to students of the period, but now to a wider circle of readers, for any introduction to be necessary. The increased interest which has of late years, in England, been taken in this and kindred subjects, and the welcome which has been given to the works of other writers upon them, encourage me to hope that in publishing this translation I am meeting a want felt by some who are either unable to read German at all, or to whom an English. It also contains some fresh matter communicated by Dr.

Электронная книга "The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy", Jacob Burckhardt. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки,. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Jacob Burckhardt rediscovered the Renaissance for the 19th century, viewing it shockingly . One hundred and fifty years ago the Swiss art lover and historian Jacob Burckhardt published his master work, The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy

Jacob Burckhardt rediscovered the Renaissance for the 19th century, viewing it shockingly as the dark and turbulent origin of modernity. Jonathan Jones hails his classic of cultural history. One hundred and fifty years ago the Swiss art lover and historian Jacob Burckhardt published his master work, The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy. I believe this anniversary is as important as last year's of Darwin's On the Origin of Species. These two great 19th-century books are still at the living heart of their subjects. The study of the Renaissance can no more forget Burckhardt than biology can leave Darwin behind. Both classics began in journeys.

This authoritative study by a distinguished scholar presents a brilliant panorama of Italian Renaissance life, explaining how and why the period constituted a cultural revolution. Author Jacob Burckhardt chronicles the transition from the medieval concept of society as a conglomeration of classes and communities to the Renaissance focus on individual spirit and creativity. Burckhardt's comprehensive view of art, government, and aspects of daily life redefined both the Western world's understanding of the Italian Renaissance and future studies of cultural history. Historian Hajo Holborn praised this survey as "the greatest single book on the history of Italy between 1350 and 1550." First published in German in 1860, its exploration of art, fashions, manners, and philosophy traces the influences of classical antiquity on Michelangelo, Leonardo, the Medicis, and other thinkers and artists. As alive today as when it was written 150 years ago, this indispensable study chronicles the revival of humanism, the conflict between church and empire, and the rise of both the modern state and the modern individual.

Comments

Braned Braned
As a preface, let me first address all these reviews bemoaning the Bibliobazaar edition - under which this review will no doubt be posted by Amazon. Apparently, it's a digitally scanned edition of some sort, chock-full of typos and even, one reviewer reports, having one chapter printed twice, and for $20.00! Just save yourself the consternation expressed here by so many and buy a used copy of the Penguin Classics edition. It's impeccably edited with an elucidating forward. It's impossible to go wrong with Penguin, and for half the price!

Now, to the book, it's rather difficult to review, as it covers so many diverse aspects of Italian society at the time (times rather, the book spans over two centuries), is full of allusions to people of whom the average, educated reader will never have heard, and, by Burckhardt's own self-deprecating admission, consists of "a string of marginal notes" concerning the place and era.

Still, it's all very interesting. Essentially, I should say that it's a sort of scholarly love letter to a time and place that enchanted Burckhardt - not without its qualifications concerning the dark side of it all. Indeed, Burckhardt spends as much time describing the depredations of the condottieri and such as he does on the glories of Florence.

What was of most interest to me was the light it shed on Nietzsche - who, for the record, was far from a pupil of Burckhardt. Nietzsche's brilliance was such that he attained a full professorship at the age of 24. But there are quotes cited from figures such as Pico della Mirandola that do ring a bell to any devotee of Nietzsche: "...that thou mightiest be free to shape and to overcome thyself." Compare this remark to Nietzsche's famous exhortation that "Man is something which must be overcome!" It lends a bit of credibility to Lord Russell's unfortunate, curt summation of Nietzsche's philosophy as "I wish I had lived in Florence in the age of the Medicis."

So - my summation of this book - a very lively and informative work by a man enchanted of an age and era.
Zehaffy Zehaffy
Burckhardt's 'Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy' is fundamental to our understanding of the Renaissance, even though it has long since ceased to be definitive. For Burckhardt (who wrote `Civilization' in the 1850s), the Italian Renaissance represented the punctuated end of the middle ages and the beginning of the modern world. He placed particular emphasis on the idea that for the first time in history, the Renaissance gave us "individuality": the idea that a person could separate themselves from the crowd by their creative genius (in art, politics, science, etc.).

Contemporary scholarship, however, takes a more nuanced approach: while Burckhardt did indeed identify in the Renaissance new cultural, political, and artistic trends, it is now argued that the Renaissance nevertheless retained many aspects of medieval civilization while the Italians, and later other Europeans, revived classical art, architecture, and science and created a new economic and political order.

Two different publishers of this book each offer introductions by two excellent contemporary historians: the Penguin Classics version is introduced by Peter Burke, and the Random House Modern Library version is introduced by Peter Gay. In the Penguin version (reviewed here) Burke (as elsewhere) argues that the Renaissance was not the clean break with the medieval past that Burckhardt suggests, although he readily acknowledges Burckhardt's foundational contribution to early Renaissance scholarship: "Burckhardt's view of the Renaissance may be easy to criticize, but it is also difficult to replace."

And of course, Burckhardt's influence on Friedrich Nietzsche should not be ignored: the concept of the `rise of the individual' (found in Part II of `Civilization': The Development of the Individual) was to have significant impact on Nietzsche's concept of the `Übermench.'

Because for so long Burckhardt's 'Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy' defined what the Renaissance was, one must spend at least a little time with Burckhardt to understand current concepts of the Renaissance in any depth. Burckhardt is effectively now a primary source.
Bedy Bedy
Though written long ago it still remains one of the best and most interesting books about the birth of the Renaissance in Italy and its dependence on the national character. Even the title of the first part (State as Work of Art) is fascinating. I'd recommend it to anyone who is interested in the history of Europe or simply loves Italy.
Jaberini Jaberini
This is a classic in the development of Renaissance Studies, even if it is a work of the 19th C. and this study has been superseded by others (such as Peter Burke or Bruce Cole); but it remains a solid early exploration of social and cultural studies of the period.
Yanthyr Yanthyr
Though the edition I had was free of typos, and I value Burckhardt's writing for his brilliant insights which have not been invalidated by subsequent scholarship, it was quite unreadable. Middlemore's clumsy but out-of-copyright translation was furnished with a new introduction and some perfunctory footnotes, then fobbed off on an unwitting public. Burckhardt writes in a sophisticated, ironic literary German which is just baffling if translated literally word by word as here. Also, there are countless references to minor events that require clarification: none is provided. A careful, up to date translation with copious annotations is needed. If anyone knows of one, I would be grateful to learn of it.
Kalrajas Kalrajas
A better book could not have fallen into my hands! An American professor in Venice recommended it, and after I read it I was only sorry I had not read it before going to Italy. The mystery of its medieval, rather Renaissance cities (Florence, Venice, among others) would have been clearer; even today's Italians' ways and personality. So much a product of Renaissance Italy...and its wonderful heritage from Ancient Rome. I truly recommend this book for Italy lovers, anyone going there soon, or for the sheer joy of reading a good history book. Jacob Burckkhardt is one of the most intelligent, enlightened historians I know.