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eBook Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to be Rescued by the Comete Escape Line in World War II ePub

eBook Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to be Rescued by the Comete Escape Line in World War II ePub

by Derek Shuff

  • ISBN: 1862272263
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Derek Shuff
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The History Press (November 23, 2003)
  • Pages: 216
  • ePub book: 1899 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1141 kb
  • Other: mobi rtf docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 596

Description

Newton owed his life to the brave 23-year-old leader of the Comète Escape Line-Andree de Jongh-codenamed Dedee

Newton owed his life to the brave 23-year-old leader of the Comète Escape Line-Andree de Jongh-codenamed Dedee.

Paperback, 240 pages. Published November 1st 2010 by The History Press. 0752457489 (ISBN13: 9780752457482).

By DEREK SHUFF Derek shuff Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Shuff, Derek Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to be Rescued by the Comete Escape Line in WWII Staplehurst, UK: Spellmount Ltd, 2003.

Evader : The Epic Story of the First British Airman to Be Rescued by the Comete Escape Line in World War II. by Derek Shuff. As air gunner Sergeant Jack Newton made his first bombing raid over Germany in 1941, his Wellington was hit by flak and the skipper was forced to make an emergency landing on a German-occupied Belgian airfield. Finding himself deep in enemy territory, Newton began an extraordinary 1,000-mile trek across Belgium and France, all the while barely a step ahead of the Nazis who were determined to catch him.

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Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to be Rescued by the Comete Escape Line in World . Travelers In The Third Reich' Examines Outsiders Views Of Hitler's Germany. World War II in Colour Has a British Viewpoint and That's It. 2 min read.

Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to be Rescued by the Comete Escape Line in World War II. Derek Shuff.

Full of terrifying and humorous moments, this is the story of the epic journey of the first British airman to escape occupied Europe during the Second World War.

Published: 05-07-2010. Full of terrifying and humorous moments, this is the story of the epic journey of the first British airman to escape occupied Europe during the Second World War. show more books.

Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to Be Rescued by the Com'ete Escape Line in World War II by Derek Shuff

escape line synonyms, escape line pronunciation, escape line translation, English dictionary definition of escape line. A planned route to allow personnel engaged in clandestine activity to depart from a site or area when possibility of compromise or apprehension exists. Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to Be Rescued by the Com'ete Escape Line in World War II by Derek Shuff. But Dedee had not come to talk about her trip.

After the war Jack Newton's adventures were related in a book - Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to Be Rescued by the Comete Escape Line in World War II by Derek Shuff

After the war Jack Newton's adventures were related in a book - Evader: The Epic Story of the First British Airman to Be Rescued by the Comete Escape Line in World War II by Derek Shuff. In that book is a dedication by Jack – To Flight Lieutenant Roy Langlois DFC; who saved my life; to Countess A. de Jongh (Deedee), who gave me those extra years of freedom. And to my wife, Mary, who never gave up hope. After splitting off from Langlois, Copley and Newton, the other three airmen from Wellington W5421 knocked at the door of a farmhouse at Lierre near Antwerp

As air gunner Sergeant Jack Newton made his first bombing raid over Germany in 1941, his Wellington was hit by flak and the skipper was forced to make an emergency landing on a German-occupied Belgian airfield. Finding himself deep in enemy territory, Newton began an extraordinary 1,000-mile trek across Belgium and France, all the while barely a step ahead of the Nazis who were determined to catch him. Newton owed his life to the brave 23-year-old leader of the Comète Escape Line—Andree de Jongh—codenamed Dedee. In this captivating true account, Derek Shuff unveils how Dedee delivered the Allied escapees to the safety of the British Embassy in San Sebastian and tells the amazing story of how the group made their way through the virtually impassable Pyrenees, all the while avoiding German patrols. Full of humor and drama, this is the story of Jack Newton's bid for freedom and the woman that put her life on the line to save him.

Comments

krot krot
Don't get me wrong, this is a great story that dovetails neatly with Airey Neave's excellent book 'Little Cyclone'. The subject matter is excellent material that should indeed be an 'epic' story. Indeed it could have been...

Unlike the well written, clean and concise 'Little Cyclone', Derek Shuff, the author of 'Evader' seems to have had several attempts to get to the end of his rambling story. Almost every chapter seems to meander a bit, very often repeating/explaining the same thing that's already been discussed or dealt with previously, as if he has left the narrative for a month or two then returned to it, forgetting what has been explained previously.

The writing style switches from present tense (which I personally find infuriating to read) to past tense, often within the same chapter or page. This really messes with the flow of a good story. Shuff uses great chunks of edited 'verbatim' comment from Jack Newton, the man whose story this is. To start off, this is acceptable, useful in fact, giving a personal perspective. The verbatim comments are much more obvious towards the end, filling pages instead of paragraphs as if the author was trying to just get to the conclusion and not have to put it into his own words.

Chapter six suddenly takes an almighty detour as Shuff introduces the heroine from Neave's 'Little Cyclone', the incredibly brave and capable Andrée de Jongh. She is code named "Dédée" as we are reminded more than once in the book. Shuff gives a potted history of who she is and what she's doing, almost a neat summary of 'Little Cyclone' in fact, condensed to a single chapter. No intricate weaving of a story, Just a new story dumped within an existing narrative, a new story that jumps ahead and takes you to the end of the war.

I'll offer constructive criticism as I'm not trying to tear this book apart. What was suddenly dumped on the reader in chapter six could have been used as a back narrative, or been written in alternate chapters from the start, running side by side until they all got together, then on in parallel again once they were parted. A writing method such as alternate chapters telling two threads of the same story unfolding in parallel could have easily stayed faithfully within the timeline that is covered by Newton's story, then neatly concluded at the end of both narratives once he was home safe and Dédée released from the concentration camp she spent the rest of the war in. Unbelievably, Shuff covers much of this ground (chapter six) again a few paragraphs into chapter 12 where the reader suddenly gets seven pages of the next eighteen months of Dédée's story as a diversion to the existing narrative.

Chapter seven is an opportunity wasted. Shuff uses the whole chapter to quote from Newton's wife Mary's diary that she wrote while he was missing in Belgium. They had only been married a matter of weeks at this time. This single chapter contains all the dairy entries, squandering poignant writings in a 'fast-forward' ride to just prior to Newton's homecoming. Each diary entry could have been used as a third independent thread on the actual timeline as it unfolds throughout the book. That would have been something great to open each chapter with. Chapter eight takes you straight back to the evaders in Belgium, giving a very disjointed timeline with little more in the story heard from Mary until he gets home.

Sadly, this is a great story written in a style that often had me shaking my head in frustration and bewilderment. The writing style should not impact on the reader's appreciation or enjoyment of the story, but in this case I wish someone else had done the writing. A different writer would have made this an 'epic' tale. Unfortunately it reminds me of a number of 'self-published' books that I have regretfully waded through.

I can thoroughly recommend Airey Neave's 'Little Cyclone' as an alternative read.
Konetav Konetav
It is good to hear the large number of people that were in the resistence. We tend to hear only about the Nazi side of the war and what was happening in Britain.
Silly Dog Silly Dog
Evader is a fascinating depiction of the risks the resistance took to help the downed pilots and the stress under which they worked.It reads like a thriller.