cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The French Foreign Legion
eBook The French Foreign Legion ePub

eBook The French Foreign Legion ePub

by Douglas Boyd

  • ISBN: 0750939397
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Douglas Boyd
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sutton Publishing; 1St Edition edition (May 15, 2006)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1277 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1460 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf doc mbr
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 501

Description

Anyone wanting to know the facts behind the myths and legends will not find a better resource than this book.

The French Foreign Legion book.

The French Foreign Legion. 691. Published: 2015. Daughters of the KGB: Moscow's Secret Spies, Sleepers and Assassins of the Cold War. Douglas Boyd. Less than 1 per cent of the French was pro-German.

Douglas Boyd’s history of the Legion answers that question, with fifteen historic photographs and eleven battle/campaign maps. Founded in 1831 to fight France’s colonial wars without spilling French blood, this mysterious army is today a world-class fighting force. Since King Louis Philippe created the French Foreign Legion in 1831, thousands of books and articles have been written and countless films made about this mysterious, myth shrouded body of men which has been almost continuously in combat in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas ever since. Legionnaires – I was one myself – have always loved a fight, man against man, section against section, company against company.

Featured book article about The French Foreign Legion by Douglas Boyd. Established in 1831 by the French king Louis Philippe, The French Foreign Legion (or in French: Légion étrangère, . is a military service wing of the French army, unique because it was exclusively created for foreign nationals willing to serve in the French armed forces. The direct reason for this was that foreigners were forbidden to serve in the French Army after the 1830 July Revolution, so the foreign legion was created to allow the government a way around this restriction.

The French Foreign Legion is commonly portrayed in literature as a refuge for the wronged, as well as scoundrels and fugitives from justice. Several versions of Beau Geste, for example, have exploited this theme to dramatic effect. There is a French song originally created by Marie Dubas in 1936 but now mainly identified with Édith Piaf, called "Mon légionnaire", about a woman's longing for an embittered Legionnaire with whom she had a brief affair and who refused to tell her his name

The French Foreign Legion. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Sold alia (385582)99. 2% positive FeedbackContact seller. The French Foreign Legion by Douglas Boyd (Hardback, 2006).

Download books for free . Douglas Boyd’s history of the Legion answers that question, with fifteen historic photographs and eleven battle/campaign maps. Training is so tough that five recruits out of six are rejected, never to wear the coveted white kepi.

Known for its austerity and discipline, deprivation and sacrifice, the French Foreign Legion is perhaps the most intriguing and famous fighting force in the world. For 170 years, jobless, homeless and loveless men have found in the Legion a sense of purpose worth all the rigors and risks of serving in the world's longest-standing mercenary army. One of the rewards for which men sign on with the Legion is French citizenship, and every legionnaire may claim it after serving three years with good conduct.

The French Foreign Legion is a military service branch of the French Army established in 1831. Legionnaires are highly trained infantry soldiers and the Legion is unique in that it is open to foreign recruits willing to serve in the French Armed Forces. When it was founded, the French Foreign Legion was not unique; other foreign formations existed at the time in France. Commanded by French officers, it is open to French citizens, who amounted to 24% of the recruits in 2007.

Known for its austerity and discipline, deprivation and sacrifice, the French Foreign Legion is perhaps the most intriguing and famous fighting force in the world. For 170 years, jobless, homeless and loveless men have found in the Legion a sense of purpose worth all the rigors and risks of serving in the world's longest-standing mercenary army. One of the rewards for which men sign on with the Legion is French citizenship, and every legionnaire may claim it after serving three years with good conduct. The Legion has never had any problem attracting recruits: seven out of ten applicants are still rejected. But what is it that attracts men from so many countries and social backgrounds to accept the harsh discipline of this legendary mercenary army with a rigid code of honor straight out of the nineteenth century? Douglas Boyd tells the eventful story of the Legion from its inception in 1831 to defend France's colonial interests, to the Legion of today involved in peacekeeping and humanitarian duties worldwide. The author also examines the reasons behind the love-hate relationship between France and the foreigners she pays to spill their blood for her which are at the core of the Legion's history.

Comments

Urtte Urtte
There have been few books that I got from Amazon that I found hard to put down, this was one. The author did an outstanding job in doing his research for the book. I found that portion dealing with Viet Nam after World War II very interesting, since I was there in 1965-66. I remember two points that are applicable here: first the 1st Cav Div was based initially at Ankhe. I and two other NCOs and about twenty Vietnamese were sent over to the airfield to get it ready for our Mohawk aircraft that were going to be based there. During our initial sweep the Vietnamese started bring us unexploded ammunition, I don't mean small arms, I am talking about artillery rounds. I had been trained while in France to know what we were seeing and I told my Company commander we needed EOD people fast. He got them over there and it took over a week to clear the area. What we had found was a French ammunition dump dating back to when the French were there. I have no idea if they were Legion or not. Later while in a convoy going to Pleiku I saw burned out vehicles down the side of the mountain road that had been there a long time and I believe were from the French Mobile 100 that was ambushed on that road, again I don't know if they were Legion or not. My point is the author while not referring to these two examples covers very well what the Legion did there.

The other point I bring up, as I mentioned I had some EOD training in France, when we had troops there. I also happened to be there when the Generals revolted and for us it was a very scary time. I was at Metz, which is French military town and we Americans had no idea what was going on or how it would effect us. Now I can see how the Legion was effected by the revolt and better understand what was really taking place.

His coverage of the overall history of the Legion is very outstanding. After finishing the book I told my wife that I was glad I did 20 years in the American Army as opposed to 5 years in the Legion. I recommend this book to anyone interested in the real Legion as opposed to the Hollywood version.
Dorilune Dorilune
There have been dozens of books written about the French Foreign Legion, and probably hundreds of novels, but many of those nonfiction books were as accurate as their fictional counterparts. In Boyd's book, we have a well-written, well-researched examination of the Legion, from its inception nearly two centuries ago to the present. Anyone wanting to know the facts behind the myths and legends will not find a better resource than this book.
Skillet Skillet
I was surprised to read about all the desertion that took place especially when the deserters ended up fighting their former comrades.

The makeup of so many Germans, especially at the end of WWII, was also a surprise but I guess they had no where else to go and really had no other skills other than being a soldier.

The Legionaires of today are probably better trained and more professional than many of those in the first years.
Thetalas Thetalas
It is my opinion that this is an excellent book: well written, intensively researched, excellent background to the topic and good to read too; one of the best historical books in my collection, it even contains maps though rudimentary (this is the only criticism I have however in contrast to many historical books at least it contains maps)
Amis Amis
Forget all you may think you know about the Foreign Legion thanks to Hollywood, This history of the Legion pulls no punches and tells the good as well as the bad,
Banal Banal
Fascinating story of the Legion. Once I started reading, I couldn't put it away. The Legion is a real professional military outfit that has no place for political hacks.
Matty Matty
haphazardly written and difficult to follow. lots of information on the Legion but the author is all over the place and has a tendency to get bogged down in minutia.
Interesting account of the legion and the dirty jobs they were assigned by the French gov't over the years. Story is sad and full of heroes and villains. All leading us to the modern legion , a professional army on par with the US Seals and the SAS.