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eBook Bridges, Law and Power in Medieval England, 700-1400 ePub

eBook Bridges, Law and Power in Medieval England, 700-1400 ePub

by Alan Cooper

  • ISBN: 1843832755
  • Category: Europe
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Alan Cooper
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Boydell Press; First Printing edition (November 16, 2006)
  • Pages: 198
  • ePub book: 1479 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1133 kb
  • Other: azw lit doc mbr
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 965

Description

Bridges, Law and Power is an interesting and informative book, but its arguments would. arguably have been easier to follow had it been prefaced with a coherent overview of earlier

Bridges, Law and Power is an interesting and informative book, but its arguments would. arguably have been easier to follow had it been prefaced with a coherent overview of earlier. work on medieval English bridges, the disciplines and traditions from which that scholarship. emanated, the main foci of interest, and where the author departed from or elaborated upon. of bridge construction, readers are referred to Nicholas Brooks’ and David Harrison’s work. on medieval English bridges, Donald Hill’s general observations about ancient and medieval.

History at Colgate University. Bridges, law and power in medieval england, 700 –1400.

From the time of Alfred the Great until beyond the end of the Middle Ages, bridges were vital to the rulers and people of England, but they were expensive and difficult to maintain. Who then was responsible for their upkeep? The answer to this question changes over the centuries, and the way in which it changes reveals much about law and power in medieval England. History at Colgate University. BOYDELL & BREWER Ltd PO Box 9, Woodbridge IP12 3DF (GB) and 668 Mt Hope Ave, Rochester NY 14620-2731 (US) US US).

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Start by marking Bridges, Law And Power In Medieval England, 700 1400 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

As the title indicates, Cooper's book is about how bridges figured in the law and political organization of. .As a result, the state of the bridges of medieval England was parlous. Even the greatest bridges were often in ruinous state

As the title indicates, Cooper's book is about how bridges figured in the law and political organization of medieval England. It is not about the design or engineering of bridges, subjects which were admirably covered a few years ago by David Harrison in The Bridges of Medieval England: Transport and Society, 400-1800 (2004). Even the greatest bridges were often in ruinous state. In the fourteenth century Rochester bridge was subject to "continual failure" (p. 101) and sometimes had to be replaced by a ferry. It finally collapsed for good in 1381.

NORTHERN HISTORYWe should gratefully salute his boldness in proposing a model for the development of bridgework from written sources and for encouraging us to explore its limitations.

In Bridges, Law and Power Alan Cooper describes the changing laws and power relations surrounding medieval English bridges and obligations to maintain and repair them. Bridges were not built in numbers until the 10th to 11th centuries: "The conclusion to be drawn from the charter bounds, place-names and narrative evidence is that there were few bridges in England before the tenth century, and that the great period of the building of bridges at points previously unbridged was between 900 and 1200.

Alan Cooper," Speculum 83, no. 2 (Ap. 2008): 416-417. Doing Things beside Domesday Book. Artificial Paleography: Computational Approaches to Identifying Script Types in Medieval Manuscripts. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis. Kestemont et al. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637.

From the time of Alfred the Great until beyond the end of the Middle Ages, bridges were vital to the rulers and people of England, but they were expensive and difficult to maintain. Who then was responsible for their upkeep? The answer to this question changes over the centuries, and the way in which it changes reveals much about law and power in medieval England. The development of law concerning the maintenance of bridges did not follow a straightforward line: legal ideas developed by the Anglo-Saxons, which had made the first age of bridge building possible, were rejected by the Normans, and royal lawyers of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries had to find new solutions to the problem. The fate of famous bridges, especially London Bridge, shows the way in which the spiritual, historical and entrepreneurial imagination was pressed into service to find solutions; the fate of humbler bridges shows the urgency with which this problem was debated across the country. By concentrating on this aspect of practical governance and tracing it through the course of the Middle Ages, much is shown about the limitations of royal power and the creativity of the medieval legal mind. ALAN COOPER is Assistant Professor of History at Colgate University.