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eBook Hell Is Over: Voices of the Kurds after Saddam, An Oral History ePub

eBook Hell Is Over: Voices of the Kurds after Saddam, An Oral History ePub

by Mike Tucker

  • ISBN: 159228695X
  • Category: Middle East
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Mike Tucker
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Lyons Press; 1st Printing edition (November 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 208
  • ePub book: 1696 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1422 kb
  • Other: doc rtf lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 893

Description

Hell is Over adds color to the Kurds' history. It does not, however, give context. Tucker does describe Saddam's mass graves, but he makes no mention of the 2,000 Kurds who disappeared during the 1994-97 Iraqi Kurdish civil war.

Hell is Over adds color to the Kurds' history. Aside from a short scene-setter describing little more than the period following the 2003 ouster of Saddam Hussein, there is no history. While Tucker dedicates his book to the memory of Kurdish nationalist hero Mulla Mustafa Barzani (1903-79), he does not explain who Barzani was or why many Kurds hold him in such esteem.

Saddam Hussein and his Ba'athist party have brutally oppressed the Kurds of northern Iraq; his systematic attempts to annihilate them included the gassing of entire Kurdish villages, torture, imprisonment, rape, and bombings. Justification for the 2003 invasion of Iraq will likely be subject to worldwide debate for years, but one fact remains clear: The war had a moral component-to liberate millions from Saddam's totalitarian rule. For the Kurds, there is no ambivalence: The war brought them one step closer to freedom.

Tucker talked about his book Hell Is Over: Voices of the Kurds After Saddam, An Oral History, published by Lyons Press. He said that in the midst of criticism over the war in Iraq, it is important to remember that the war liberated millions of Kurds. For his book, the author spoke with numerous Kurds who told him about pivotal events in their lives from the Revolution of 1961 to the role the Kurds played in the latest war in Iraq.

HELL IS OVER is truly epic and historic work.

The voices of the Kurds in Mike Tucker's book could be our voices or the voices of our neighbors. HELL IS OVER is truly epic and historic work. From a brother Marine infantry veteran, Semper Fi.

The move came after US troops, who relied on the militia alliance to defeat the Islamic State (IS) group on th. .

We've boiled down why it matters. Why has Turkey launched an assault? One main reason: Turkey considers the biggest militia in the Kurdish-led alliance a terrorist group.

voices of the Kurds after Saddam. by Tucker, Mike correspondent. Published 2004 by Lyons Press in Guilford, Conn. In library, Civil rights, Crimes against, Protected DAISY, Kurds, Interviews. Includes bibliographical references (p. 167) and index. Voices of the Kurds after Saddam.

Hell Is Over: Voices of the Kurds after Saddam, Lyons Press (Guilford, CT) . The result of this journey is his book Hell Is Over: Voices of the Kurds.

Hell Is Over: Voices of the Kurds after Saddam, Lyons Press (Guilford, CT), 2004. Among Warriors in Iraq: True Grit, Special Ops, and Raiding in Mosul and Fallujah, Lyons Press (Guilford, CT), 2005. In 2003, Tucker traveled in Iraqi Kurdistan, interviewing many Kurds in a variety of settings. The result of this journey is his book Hell Is Over: Voices of the Kurds after Saddam. Among the people he interviewed were peshmerga fighters-the armed Kurdish militia-, Kurdish politicians, and Kurdish nationals who were political prisoners during Saddam Hussein's rule over Kurdish Iraq, when the treatment of the Kurds was especially harsh.

Hell Is Over: Voices of the Kurds after Saddam, An Oral History. By Mike Tucker (The Lyons Press, 2004). Humanitarian Intervention Assisting the Iraqi Kurds in Operation Provide Comfort, 1991. By Gordon W. Rudd and US Army Center of Military History (Military Bookshop, 2012). The Kurds of Iraq: Ethnonationalism and National Identity in Iraqi Kurdistan. By Mahir A. Aziz (Tauris Academic Studies, 2011).

Kurds, who today live in a mountainous area that extends over Iran, Iraq, Turkey, and Syria, are a fiercely proud and culturally .

Kurds, who today live in a mountainous area that extends over Iran, Iraq, Turkey, and Syria, are a fiercely proud and culturally rich people whose history is indelibly marred by political machinations and betrayal. Saddam Hussein and his Ba'athist Party have brutally oppressed the Kurds of northern Iraq; his systematic attempts to annihilate them included mass murders, the gassing of entire Kurdish villages, torture, imprisonment, rape, and bombings

As Saddam Hussein goes to trial, a chilling testimony to his unrelenting brutality.

Comments

Mitars Riders Mitars Riders
In the tradition of Edwar R. Murrow's "This...is London" broadcasts, Mick Tucker has written an inspiring book that reveals the story of a heroic people confronting a monstrous tyranny bent on their annilation. Unlike Morrow, Mike lets those people, the Kurds, speak for themselves though. The result is a book that reveals Kurds as a people remarkably free of decadence and ambiguity. Self indulgence, frivolity, irony...All that has been ablated away by atrocity and war. What remains is the courage of Hector, the defiance of Churchill, and determination of David. Mike lets the Kurds tell a story where the only spin is that put on a bullet meant for their enemy, and the "exit plan" is victory. Mike keeps his thoughts and feelings right out in the open, so the reader does not need to wonder what he is trying to say. He admires the Kurds... And for good reason. There is much to admire.

The book tasks us. It shouts a crystal clear question. If you honor freedom, justice and truth, should you sit on your hands and let evil destroy those things? For anyone who can't find the answer, they should read this book.
Shadowredeemer Shadowredeemer
A MAGNIFICENT BOOK. I LIVED FOR A YEAR WITH THE KURDS OF NORTHERN IRAQ, AND THIS IS THE ONLY BOOK I KNOW OF WHICH DOES JUSTICE TO THEIR BRAVERY AND SUFFERING. TUCKER DID NOT JET IN COUNTRY FOR A FEW DAYS, CONDUCT A FEW INTERVIEWS AND THEN RUSH HOME TO WORK ON HIS MANUSCRIPT AND MEET WITH HIS AGENT. HE HAD THE FORTITUDE AND INTEGRITY TO SPEND MONTHS IN COUNTRY, LIVING WITH THE KURDS, GAINING THEIR TRUST AND LEARNING THEIR HISTORY AND TRADITIONS. AS A RESULT, HE WAS ABLE TO COMPILE A STUNNING COLLECTION OF INTERVIEWS OF ASTONISHING QUALITY. IF YOU WANT TO COMPREHEND THE INHUMANITY OF SADDAM AND THE UNPARALLELED COURAGE AND STRENGTH OF THE KURDISH PEOPLE, READ THIS BOOK.
Mogelv Mogelv
Since the end of the United States-led war to liberate Iraq, journalists and authors have descended into Iraqi Kurdistan to try their luck at telling the Kurds' story, taking advantage of the fact that, after decades of war and isolation, the area is once again easily accessible.

Tucker, a war correspondent and former U.S. marine, traveled throughout Iraqi Kurdistan in July 2003, and Hell is Over is a collection of his interviews. The collection divides into three parts. One focuses on stories and recollections of the peshmerga, literally "those who face death," a term used both for Kurdish guerilla fighters and their militias. The second highlights torture by interviewing former political prisoners and family members of those raped, tortured, and killed, as well as the reaction of U.S. servicemen who witnessed the excavation of mass graves. The final part takes up the story of artists, politicians, and women's rights activists.

Hell is Over adds color to the Kurds' history. It does not, however, give context. Aside from a short scene-setter describing little more than the period following the 2003 ouster of Saddam Hussein, there is no history. While Tucker dedicates his book to the memory of Kurdish nationalist hero Mulla Mustafa Barzani (1903-79), he does not explain who Barzani was or why many Kurds hold him in such esteem. For that matter, Tucker does not explain who Patriotic Union of Kurdistan leader Jalal Talabani is, a glaring omission given that Talabani controls half the Kurdish zone and is now president of Iraq.

Tucker surrenders balance and accuracy to his own romanticism. He thanks Kurdistan Democratic Party leaders in his acknowledgments and appears to have had no contact with independents or with officials in areas controlled by Talabani. Accordingly, he uncritically accepts canards about Talabani, such as his having sided with Saddam Hussein against Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) leader Masoud Barzani. While Talabani may have sought Iranian assistance in the 1994-97 Kurdish civil war, it was Barzani who invited the Republican Guard into the northern Iraqi city of Erbil, where they rounded up and executed Iraqi opposition figures. Tucker does describe Saddam's mass graves, but he makes no mention of the 2,000 Kurds who disappeared during the 1994-97 Iraqi Kurdish civil war. While Tucker describes Masoud Barzani's son Masrour "as one of the young lions of the Kurdish leadership," he neglects to mention Masrour's role as the head of KDP intelligence and as the enforcer for Barzani's business interests.

Tucker concludes Hell is Over with a plea for U.S. policymakers to listen to the Kurds more closely. Unfortunately, his collection is more a testament to the skewed narrative that can result from listening without a critical ear to Kurdish officials. A far better option for historical and political context is Christiane Bird's A Thousand Sighs, A Thousand Revolts: Journeys in Kurdistan.[1]

[1] New York: Ballantine Books, 2004.

Middle East Quarterly, Summer 2005
avanger avanger
Since the end of the United States-led war to liberate Iraq, journalists and authors have descended into Iraqi Kurdistan to try their luck at telling the Kurds' story, taking advantage of the fact that, after decades of war and isolation, the area is once again easily accessible.

Tucker, a war correspondent and former U.S. marine, traveled throughout Iraqi Kurdistan in July 2003, and Hell is Over is a collection of his interviews. The collection divides into three parts. One focuses on stories and recollections of the peshmerga, literally "those who face death," a term used both for Kurdish guerilla fighters and their militias. The second highlights torture by interviewing former political prisoners and family members of those raped, tortured, and killed, as well as the reaction of U.S. servicemen who witnessed the excavation of mass graves. The final part takes up the story of artists, politicians, and women's rights activists.

Hell is Over adds color to the Kurds' history. It does not, however, give context. Aside from a short scene-setter describing little more than the period following the 2003 ouster of Saddam Hussein, there is no history. While Tucker dedicates his book to the memory of Kurdish nationalist hero Mulla Mustafa Barzani (1903-79), he does not explain who Barzani was or why many Kurds hold him in such esteem. For that matter, Tucker does not explain who Patriotic Union of Kurdistan leader Jalal Talabani is, a glaring omission given that Talabani controls half the Kurdish zone and is now president of Iraq.

Tucker surrenders balance and accuracy to his own romanticism. He thanks Kurdistan Democratic Party leaders in his acknowledgments and appears to have had no contact with independents or with officials in areas controlled by Talabani. Accordingly, he uncritically accepts canards about Talabani, such as his having sided with Saddam Hussein against Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) leader Masoud Barzani. While Talabani may have sought Iranian assistance in the 1994-97 Kurdish civil war, it was Barzani who invited the Republican Guard into the northern Iraqi city of Erbil, where they rounded up and executed Iraqi opposition figures. Tucker does describe Saddam's mass graves, but he makes no mention of the 2,000 Kurds who disappeared during the 1994-97 Iraqi Kurdish civil war. While Tucker describes Masoud Barzani's son Masrour "as one of the young lions of the Kurdish leadership," he neglects to mention Masrour's role as the head of KDP intelligence and as the enforcer for Barzani's business interests.

Tucker concludes Hell is Over with a plea for U.S. policymakers to listen to the Kurds more closely. Unfortunately, his collection is more a testament to the skewed narrative that can result from listening without a critical ear to Kurdish officials. A far better option for historical and political context is Christiane Bird's A Thousand Sighs, A Thousand Revolts: Journeys in Kurdistan.[1]
[1] New York: Ballantine Books, 2004.

By Michael Rubin
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