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eBook M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941–45 (New Vanguard) ePub

eBook M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941–45 (New Vanguard) ePub

by Steven J. Zaloga,Hugh Johnson

  • ISBN: 1841768898
  • Category: Military
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Steven J. Zaloga,Hugh Johnson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing; 1st edition (August 10, 2005)
  • Pages: 48
  • ePub book: 1357 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1309 kb
  • Other: lrf azw mobi txt
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 599

Description

Zaloga begins his narrative with a discussion of the genesis of the medium tank concept and the unsuccessful .

Zaloga begins his narrative with a discussion of the genesis of the medium tank concept and the unsuccessful M2 tank built in 1939-41. Due to German successes in the opening year of the Second World War, the US Army suddenly recognized the need for medium tanks but early attempts to produce a viable design were handicapped by the backwardness of US defense industry.

Zaloga begins his narrative with a discussion of the genesis of the medium tank concept and the unsuccessful .

New Vanguard, I I 3. M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941-45. Steven J Zaloga, Illustrated by Hugh Johnson. Total production of the basic M3 medium tank and British Grant I tank amounted to 4,924 tanks or about 79 percent of eventual M3 series production. First published in Great Britain in 2005 by Osprey Publishing, Midland House, West Way, Botley, Oxford 0X2 OPH, UK 443 Park Avenue South, New York, NY 10016, USA E-mail: infoeypublishing.

M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941-45 (New Vanguard). His books have been translated into Japanese, German, Polish, Steven Zaloga is an author and defense analyst known worldwide for his articles and publications on military technology. He has written over a hundred books on military technology and military history, including Armored Thunderbolt: The US Army Sherman in World War II, one of the most highly regarded histories of the Sherman Tank. His books have been translated into Japanese, German, Polish, Czech, Romanian, and Russian.

M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941–45 - Steven J. Zaloga. M3 Lee/grant medium tank 1941–45. The M3 medium tank was rushed into production in 1941 as a stop-gap to satisfy the desperate need for a medium tank in the US and British tank forces. Its design was a messy stew of outdated inter-war design features and time-saving short-cuts.

Steven Zaloga, Hugh Johnson. The highly successful 'stop-gap' M3 medium tank was designed in 1941, and as adequate turret casting facilities were not yet ready, the M3 used an unusual armament configuration patterned after a French tank. British lend-lease demands led to the design of a second turret type with the US version called the Lee and the British version the Grant. It could penetrate Panzer armor, and its explosive firepower was excellent for dealing with German anti-tank guns. This book covers the design, development, service and variants of a vehicle that was the backbone.

M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941-45. Book in the Osprey New Vanguard Series).

Hugh Johnson is a highly-experienced and talented freelance digital illustrator who has recently completed exceptional work on New Vanguard 102 . M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941–45 New Vanguard. Издание: иллюстрированное.

Hugh Johnson is a highly-experienced and talented freelance digital illustrator who has recently completed exceptional work on New Vanguard 102: 'T-54 and T-55 Main Battle Tanks 1944–2004' for Osprey.

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Read M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941–45, by Steven J. Zaloga online on Bookmate – The highly successful 'stop-gap' M3 medium tank was designed in 1941, and as adequate turret casting facilities were . Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline.

The highly successful 'stop-gap' M3 medium tank was designed in 1941, and as adequate turret casting facilities were not yet ready, the M3 used an unusual armament configuration patterned after a French tank. British lend-lease demands led to the design of a second turret type with the US version called the Lee and the British version the Grant. It could penetrate Panzer armor, and its explosive firepower was excellent for dealing with German anti-tank guns. This book covers the design, development, service and variants of a vehicle that was the backbone of many World War II forces.

Comments

uspeh uspeh
This is really about a 3.5 star book. The history and development material on the M3 is more than satisfactory, the photographs and illustrations are good as well, but the sections focusing on the combat experience of this tank in different theaters of was lacking in my estimation. I guess I was hoping for more experiences of tank crews with this machine in theater.
Bad Sunny Bad Sunny
Good overview of this tank. I would have liked more details on the armor. Was the armor thicker on the British turret?
you secret you secret
Nice book
Gadar Gadar
Stephen J. Zaloga's M3 Lee/Grant Medium Tank 1941-45 provides a good summary of the hasty introduction of the first US medium tank in the summer of 1941. Given that the M4 Sherman medium tank normally gains most of the attention on US armor in the Second World War, Zaloga's volume in Osprey's New Vanguard series sheds light on an all-but-forgotten weapon system that was there when it mattered.

Zaloga begins his narrative with a discussion of the genesis of the medium tank concept and the unsuccessful M2 tank built in 1939-41. Due to German successes in the opening year of the Second World War, the US Army suddenly recognized the need for medium tanks but early attempts to produce a viable design were handicapped by the backwardness of US defense industry. The M3 Lee tank, which began series production in June 1941, was seen by the US Armored Force as a stop-gap until the better-designed M4 Sherman became available in 1942. However, British pressure to produce a version of the M3 for their own use in North Africa led to the M3 Grant variant and an expansion of the program. By the time of Pearl Harbor, over 800 M3s had been built and over 6,000 were built by the time production ceased in December 1942. Zaloga's description of the M3's development is a bit brief even for this format; one item that remains unclear is what impact the concurrent M3 and M4 programs had on each other (i.e. competition for resources). Zaloga provides a table that lists all M3 production, broken down by month and by individual plants.

Almost half this volume comprises the M3's operational use by Commonwealth, US and Soviet forces in the Second World War. Zaloga notes that the British liked the Grant's firepower and automotive reliability and this tank formed the backbone of the 8th Army's tank force in the critical battles of Gazala, Alam Halfa and El Alamein. The US Army only used the M3 in Tunisia in 1942-43 and the tank was soon phased out in favor of the M4. Although considered obsolete by 1943, the M3 continued to see extensive service against the Japanese in Burma and India. Zaloga includes tables that list foreign deployment of the M3 and lend-lease shipments. Zaloga concludes the volume with a brief description of variants, including the M7 self-propelled 105mm howitzer and tank retrievers. Color plates include M3s in pre-war colors, in Soviet and Commonwealth markings and an interesting cutaway diagram. Although not a successful design, the M3 medium tank represented a stop gap that achieved its purpose of equipping the nascent US tank force until better equipment became available. Furthermore, the production of over 6,000 M3s in a short period was an amazing achievement for a US defense industry that up to that point had no record of producing large quantities of armored vehicles.
Winail Winail
This small work details the history fo the famous Grant/Lee tank that served as a stop-gap measure for the US armored force early in the war. The drawings are excellent and the descriptions are quite good. Most interesting of all is that the Americans built this based on the French B-1 tank, although the American version gave the 75-mm a slightly greater field of fire in a sponsoon mount instead of a hull mounting. Highly recommened as a great little reference for this important development in U.S. armor.
Yannara Yannara
most: history and various views color plates
least: could have had more on the British m3 Grant