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eBook Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought: The Red Army's Military Effectiveness in World War II (Modern War Studies) ePub

eBook Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought: The Red Army's Military Effectiveness in World War II (Modern War Studies) ePub

by Roger R. Reese

  • ISBN: 0700617760
  • Category: Military
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Roger R. Reese
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Press of Kansas; First Edition edition (April 28, 2011)
  • Pages: 408
  • ePub book: 1487 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1924 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf mbr mobi
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 639

Description

The Red Army was at all times militarily effective," although it "simultaneously fought quite inefficiently" (306). Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought makes an excellent contribution to the literature about the Soviet people's response to World War II and Stalinism.

The Red Army was at all times militarily effective," although it "simultaneously fought quite inefficiently" (306). By "effectiveness," Reese means "the ability of an army to sustain battle" (3). Supported by the public as a whole, Soviet forces performed poorly on many occasions but never lost the ability to fight the Germans. Soviet citizens served or evaded duty for many reasons. Simplistic notions about glorious patriotism or pervasive disloyalty are unhelpful.

Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought. Series: Modern War Studies. Reese probes the human dimension of the Red Army in World War II through a close analysis of soldiers' experiences and attitudes concerning mobilization, motivation, and morale

Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought. Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought. Reese probes the human dimension of the Red Army in World War II through a close analysis of soldiers' experiences and attitudes concerning mobilization, motivation, and morale. In doing so, he illuminates the Soviets' remarkable ability to recruit and retain soldiers, revealing why so many were willing to fight in the service of a repressive regime-and how that service was crucial to the army's military effectiveness.

Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought book Brimming with fresh insights, Reese's study shows how the Red Army's effectiveness in the Great Patriotic War was foreshadowed.

Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought book. Brimming with fresh insights, Reese's study shows how the Red Army's effectiveness in the Great Patriotic War was foreshadowed by its performance in the Winter War against Finland and offers the first direct comparison between the two, delving into specific issues such as casualties, tactics, leadership, morale, and surrender.

Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought: The Red Army's Military Effectiveness in World War II (Modern War Studies). Reese’s book is an important one which should alter in important ways the way we think about the prewar Red Army

Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought: The Red Army's Military Effectiveness in World War II (Modern War Studies). Reese’s book is an important one which should alter in important ways the way we think about the prewar Red Army. It makes a major contribution to re-evaluating of the problems and losses of the Red Army in 1941 and afterwards. This work makes a valuable contribution to the history of the Red Army and to the social history of the Stalinist Soviet Union. This work makes important contributions to both military and Russian history.

Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 2011. Recommend this journal.

This campaign of official mythmaking quickly attached itself to the question of why Soviet soldiers fought despite the terrible mismanagement of their commanders, the huge number of prisoners taken by the Nazis and their allies, and despite a generation of brutality by the Stalinist regime.

Explores why the Soviet Union won its war against Nazi Germany despite .

Explores why the Soviet Union won its war against Nazi Germany despite inept leadership, inefficient campaigning, and enormous losses. Illuminates the Soviets' remarkable ability to recruit and retain soldiers and reveals why so many were willing to fight in the service of a repressive regime. Modern War Studies (Hardcover). University Press of Kansas.

B&W Photographs ISBN: 9780700617760 (Soviet Union, Military Sociology, Soldiers, Social Conditions). Duty, Honor, Victory: America's Athletes In World War II. Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). hartmannbooks.

Ultimately, he makes five six points: although not as militarily proficient as the Wehrmacht, the Red Army grew to become an effective fighting force; Soviet morale fluctuated, due to a variety of factors, but tended to rise as the war went on; a broad variety of factors influenced the troops’ motivation varied greatly; state use.

Inept leadership, inefficient campaigning, and enormous losses would seem to spell military disaster. Yet despite these factors, the Soviet Union won its war against Nazi Germany thanks to what Roger Reese calls its "military effectiveness": its ability to put troops in the field even after previous forces had been decimated. Reese probes the human dimension of the Red Army in World War II through a close analysis of soldiers' experiences and attitudes concerning mobilization, motivation, and morale. In doing so, he illuminates the Soviets' remarkable ability to recruit and retain soldiers, revealing why so many were willing to fight in the service of a repressive regime—and how that service was crucial to the army's military effectiveness. He examines the various forms of voluntarism and motivations to serve-including the influences of patriotism and Soviet ideology-and shows that many fought simply out of loyalty to the idea of historic Russia and hatred for the invading Germans. He also considers the role of political officers within the ranks, the importance of commanders who could inspire their troops, the bonds of allegiance forged within small units, and persistent fears of Stalin's secret police. Brimming with fresh insights, Reese's study shows how the Red Army's effectiveness in the Great Patriotic War was foreshadowed by its performance in the Winter War against Finland and offers the first direct comparison between the two, delving into specific issues such as casualties, tactics, leadership, morale, and surrender. Reese also presents a new analysis of Soviet troops captured during the early war years and how those captures tapped into Stalin's paranoia over his troops' loyalties. He provides a distinctive look at the motivations and experiences of Soviet women soldiers and their impact on the Red Army's ability to wage war. Ultimately, Reese puts a human face on the often anonymous Soviet soldiers to show that their patriotism was real, even if not a direct endorsement of the Stalinist system, and had much to do with the Red Army's ability to defeat the most powerful army the world had ever seen.

Comments

I_LOVE_228 I_LOVE_228
This book provides a serious effort to study why the Soviet Army fought in World War Two, with an obvious focus on why the troops fought so hard for a regime that treated its military personnel so callously. Roger Reese goes a long way toward answering this critical question using solid analytic tools and available sources, and I applaud his effort. However, after reading the book one is still left with questions about how Moscow was able to force so many of its troops to take part in so many futile, even suicidal massed infantry attacks against strong defenses. I think that all of us who have read a lot about the war on the Eastern Front are left wondering about this question and I'm guessing that Reese cannot find more first-hand accounts of particiapnts in such actions to better address the question. Nonetheless, Reese's book is well-organized and he does a great job of reiterating his key judgments. A second, minor criticism is that I would have liked more photographs and other graphics.
Shakagul Shakagul
Interesting account of the many reasons (some obvious, some more complex) why Soviet soldiers fought more or less willingly in World War II. It's not the frequent simple argument that they fought because the NKVD would execute them if they refused.
Adrierdin Adrierdin
Generally I would characterize this book more as an academic/sociological study rather than military history, and the book spends lots of space describing the various psychological/sociological factors impacting the Soviet will to fight. While I found much of this material rather obvious and tedious, the book also includes a wealth of anecdotes and statistics illustrating various points, and the general (military) reader will probably find at least these materials interesting.
Rrd Rrd
It has been a mystery to me why common soldiers fight for what can only be described as evil governments. So I found this book fascinating.

In this case, most armies manned by soldiers who had little love of their government, faced with by massive losses and disaster lead by poor leadership and having bad logistics would have fallen apart. Not the Soviet armies, despite all this they kept on going even when it looked to them that the state they were fighting for was beaten.

Some points I did find interesting was that during WW2, most armies prized soldiers with farming background yet comparatively few of these farmer boys actually wanted to fight for the Soviets. This would have been a major problem for the Soviets.

Another point I found interesting was overall the Soviet government faced with must have been a major ideological problem acted intelligently in trying to get its troops to fight.

I look forward to reading similar books on other armies.
Rocky Basilisk Rocky Basilisk
Outstanding study of the hearts and minds that drove the Red Army.
superstar superstar
Roger Reese's work is always interesting, accessible, and important. This book contributes a lot to our understanding of the Red Army through the extensive use of recently-published interviews and memoirs, and newly-available archival materials. (The Preface provides an excellent evaluation of sources.) The discussion of primary group theory is particularly valuable, as this subject hasn't received nearly enough attention in Russian military history compared to works on Germany's forces. Reese makes a key contribution in his analysis of the Red Army's catastrophic losses of the first year, which he argues was due to the unique military situation (force ratios, training and doctrine, supply, fatigue) rather than to lack of motivation or will. He also persuasively shows that politics played a minimal role as either as a positive or negative troop motivator. Read firsthand accounts, by all means (as another reviewer has suggested) -- then read this book to place the soldiers' experience of war in a meaningful context.