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eBook An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943 ePub

eBook An Army at Dawn, The War in North Africa, 1942-1943 ePub

by George Guidall,Rick Atkinson

  • ISBN: 1402586744
  • Category: Military
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: George Guidall,Rick Atkinson
  • Publisher: RecordedBooks (2003)
  • ePub book: 1833 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1832 kb
  • Other: doc rtf azw docx
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 855

Description

An Army at Dawn may be the best World War II battle narrative since Cornelius Ryan's classics, The Longest .

An Army at Dawn may be the best World War II battle narrative since Cornelius Ryan's classics, The Longest Day and A Bridge Too Far. ―Max Boot, The Wall Street Journal. A book that stands shoulder to shoulder with the other major books about the war, such as the fine writing of Cornelius Ryan and John Keegan. This is the North African campaign-warts, snafus, feuding allies, shed.

An Army at Dawn book. In other words, you won’t be like every fan of George . An Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942-1943. World War II Liberation Trilogy by. Rick Atkinson. Martin or Robert Caro, waiting half a decade for the next book, wondering if there will be a next book). As far as World War II books ago, heck as far as history books go, this is a gem. It is a triumph of narrative, characterizations, and sober analysis.

78 23 5 Kirjailija: Rick Atkinson Lukija: George Guidall

78 23 5 Kirjailija: Rick Atkinson Lukija: George Guidall. Saatavilla äänikirjana. Beginning the trilogy that continues with The Day of Battle, An Army at Dawn opens on the eve of Operation TORCH, the daring amphibious invasion of Morocco and Algeria. After three days of hard fighting against the French, American and British troops push deeper into North Africa. The Allies discover that they are woefully unprepared.

An Army at Dawn: The War in North Africa, 1942–1943 is a Pulitzer Prize–winning book written in 2002 by long-time Washington Post correspondent Rick Atkinson. The book is a history of the North African Campaign, particularly focused on the role of the United States military. The book follows the early planning stages of the Allied invasion (Operation Torch) of North Africa, the landings in Casablanca, Oran, and Algiers, and finally the back and forth struggle for dominance in Tunisia.

Written by Rick Atkinson, Audiobook narrated by George Guidall

Written by Rick Atkinson, Audiobook narrated by George Guidall. Beginning with the daring amphibious invasion in November 1942, An Army at Dawn follows the American and British armies as they fight the French in Morocco and Algeria, and then take on the Germans and Italians in Tunisia. Battle by battle, an inexperienced and sometimes poorly led army gradually becomes a superb fighting force.

Читает George Guidall. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента.

committee designed a general framework for the faculty institutes and chose the Middle East-North Africa.

We may have all come on different ships, but we're in the same boat now. ― . committee designed a general framework for the faculty institutes and chose the Middle East-North Africa. Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future.

Originally published: New York : Henry Holt & C. 2002. Includes bibliographical references (pages 543-654) and index. List of maps - Map legend - Allied chain of command - Passage. A meeting with the Dutchman ; Gathering the ships ; Rendezvous at Cherchel ; On the knees of the gods ; A man must believe in his luck - Landing. In the night, all cats are grey" ; In Barbary ; Villain ; To the last man ; "Glory enough for us all" - Beachhead.

The book is a history of the North African Campaign, particularly focused on the role of the United States military.

The Liberation Trilogy. Atkinson constructs his narrative from letters, newspaper articles, and personal diaries of commanders, soldiers, and others on the ground in northern Africa.

Best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson is a 20-year veteran writer for the Washington Post. This authoritative account of the World War II Allied victories in North Africa is a brilliant, insightful, and impeccably researched masterpiece. "An Army at Dawn may be the best World War II battle narrative since ... The Longest Day and A Bridge Too Far."-Wall Street Journal

Comments

Atineda Atineda
Atkinson is a gifted writer with a talent for presenting WWII combat in blunt, unadorned prose faithfully describing the chaos, terror, emotional shock, pathos and savagery of each battle. As an additional bonus, the author focuses on the ordinary American infantryman and the American home front, two heroes often given short shrift in WWII non-fiction books. Using his talent for almost lyrical prose, Atkinson can make you experience the frustration, fears and hopes of ordinary soldiers fighting desperate battles - the sense of stark realism is tempered by his compassion for ordinary soldiers attempting to follow orders, orders both foolish and brilliant. Atkinson also acknowledges our debt to the American home front which produced an abundance of weapons, supplies and food which powered not only the American forces but the Brits, Russians, Chinese and Canadians on various fronts. His description of a small Iowa town receiving a blizzard of "We regret to inform you" telegrams from the War Dept. after a single, bloody battle conveys a sense of the shock and despair experienced by the town's residents upon learning that many of their sons had died in combat - a truly moving depiction of the grief shared by a close knit community of average Americans.

However, Atkinson shares an obsession held by many historians. He drags the reader through the childish politics of the North African war, the oft told tale of the Darlan incident, the juvenile antics of Churchill and Roosevelt touring the countryside after their self serving conference in Casablanca and the feud between British and American generals detailing the Brits' national inferiority complex over American efforts to assist them and the American's unwarranted feelings of inferiority toward a British military who retreated in France, were hastily evacuated, had their capitol city thoroughly bombed, surrendered an impregnable fortress in Singapore and after many initial failures finally managed to stand up to the Germans in Africa. If you're looking for a Homeric tale of heroes like Achilles and Hector - only with Eisenhower and Montgomery playing the hero role then this isn't the book for you. Atkinson is unimpressed with our various Great Men but he consistently tries to be fair in his criticism of their faults. Overall, an excellent WWII history with the exception of tedious political squabbles.
Mr_Mole Mr_Mole
This is the first volume in Atkinson's "Liberation Trilogy," essentially the story of the U.S. Army in the African and European Theater from 1942 to 1945. The air force and navy (and the British) each play a role too, but the focus is firmly on American generals and soldiers. What makes this such a great read is the author's journalistically-trained hand at telling a gripping narrative. We don't get lost in "order of battle" details, but rather focus on what people were thinking (based on letters and diaries, for example) and doing on both sides of the battle line.

This first volume centers on the 1942-43 war in North Africa which was a difficult learning experience for Eisenhower and everyone else. Sometimes we got beaten by the superb German fighting man. Slowly, backed by the growing military industrial output of the home front, we edged the Germans out of Africa. But it was never easy. (Volume II relates the campaigns in Sicily and Italy; volume III from D-Day to the end of the war with Germany.)

This volume and its successors are military history even for those who think they don't like military history. They are eminently readable--often hard to put down, even though you know what happens in the end. The meld of high command and trench-level viewpoints is very effective. I've done a good deal of reading in the literature of World War II, and I'd place these volumes very close to the top in terms of quality...and approachability. Read them--you'll see.
Cogelv Cogelv
I am halfway through the book and have found several inaccuracies but these are not really significant. The real point is that the author tells the story through a sort of condescending "Monday Morning Quarterback" style. This was a citizen army rushing into it's first ever major league conflict. The author seems to sort of have a joke about the shortcomings of the allies. I wouldn't read this as a first learning of the conflict. It's OK if you are quite familiar with what actually happened already. It is a kind of story composed of anecdotal pieces, interesting, but does not really combine to give the whole story. I feel that the author tried to make the work more interesting and entertaining rather getting to
the heart of the matter. I admit that I am only half way through the book but that is increasingly my impression.