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eBook Confronting the Crime of Silence: Evidence of U.S. War Crimes in Indochina ePub

eBook Confronting the Crime of Silence: Evidence of U.S. War Crimes in Indochina ePub

by Ward Churchill,Natsu Saito

  • ISBN: 1904859216
  • Category: Military
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Ward Churchill,Natsu Saito
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: AK Press (June 1, 2005)
  • ePub book: 1120 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1478 kb
  • Other: doc mbr lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 625

Description

war" surrounding US war crimes in Indochina. Natsu Saito is a professor of international law atGeorgia State University and a prolific writer and lecturer.

war" surrounding US war crimes in Indochina. From "free fire zones" to defoliation campaigns, Jean-Paul Sartre to Green Berets, the testimonies they present paint a picture of wholesale criminality systematically orchestrated by US policy-makers and executed by its foot soldiers. By confronting the silence, Churchill and Saito do justice not only to the victims of our indefensible crimes, but to all of us as we bear our moral responsibility to end today's wars of aggression.

With this two-volume collection, Ward Churchill and Natsu Saito have assembled material from three of the most powerful documents of the Vietnam era: Bertrand Russell's International War Crimes Tribunal.

the Crime of Silence : Evidence of . War Crimes in Indochina.

Confronting the Crime of Silence : Evidence of . AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

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A War crime is an act that constitutes a serious violation of the laws of war that gives rise to individual criminal responsibility, such as intentionally killing civilians or prisoners, torturing, destroying civilian property, taking hostages, perfo.

Ward Churchill speaking at the Women's Building in San Francisco on March 25. out of out of out of. I agree with.

Ward Churchill speaking at the Women's Building in San Francisco on March 25, 2005.

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This article lists and summarizes the war crimes committed since the Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907 and the crimes against humanity and crimes against peace that have been committed since these crimes were first defined in the Rome Statute.

This article lists and summarizes the war crimes committed since the Hague Conventions of 1899 and 1907 and the crimes against humanity and crimes against peace that have been committed since these crimes were first defined in the Rome Statute

Mark Pavlick, Caroline Luft. The United States, Southeast Asia, and Historical Memory sheds crucial new light on the epochal US interventions in Southeast Asia after World War II.

Mark Pavlick, Caroline Luft. The United States came out of the Indochina wars with a tarnished reputation, as evidence of their behaviours came to light. war crimes in other countries like Afghanistan and Iraq continue to blight the country - Mark Pavlick and a group of scholars provide insight into some of the first and the worst war crimes perpetrated by the American military. Includes essays from Noam Chomsky.

It is a crime against the people because the people are in essence the state, the nation. The leaders of our nations are merely our representatives placed in positions of power through various, more or less democratic mechanisms to act for our benefit, on our behalf.

With this two-volume collection, Ward Churchill and Natsu Saito have assembled material from three of the most powerful documents of the Vietnam era: Bertrand Russell's International War Crimes Tribunal, the Vietnam Veterans Against the War's Winter Soldier Investigation, and the congressional records of the Dellums Committee Hearings on War Crimes in Vietnam. Fully annotated with extensive commentary by the editors, these documents blow away the "fog of war" surrounding US war crimes in Indochina. From "free fire zones" to defoliation campaigns, Jean-Paul Sartre to Green Berets, the testimonies they present paint a picture of wholesale criminality systematically orchestrated by US policy-makers and executed by its foot soldiers.

We are offered a chilling view of the moral and legal issues surrounding US military engagement. Examining the evidence of war crimes in Indochina, the International Tribunal testimonies include Noam Chomsky, Bertrand Russell, Gabriel Kolko, Tariq Ali, Dave Dellinger and assorted historians, scientists and journalists. From the Dellums Committee Hearings and the Winter Soldier Investigation, we hear from combat soldiers themselves as they recount the grisly realities of a genocidal war.

By confronting the silence, Churchill and Saito do justice not only to the victims of our indefensible crimes, but to all of us as we bear our moral responsibility to end today's wars of aggression.

Ward Churchill is chair of the Ethnic Studies department at the University of Colorado at Boulder, a winner of the Gustavus Myers Award for Literature on Human Rights and the author of more than 20 books.

Natsu Saito is a professor of international law at Georgia State University and a prolific writer and lecturer.