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eBook First 24 Hours of War in the Pacific ePub

eBook First 24 Hours of War in the Pacific ePub

by Donald J Young

  • ISBN: 1572490799
  • Category: Military
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Donald J Young
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Burd Street Press; 1st edition (1998)
  • Pages: 188
  • ePub book: 1694 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1830 kb
  • Other: doc rtf txt mobi
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 338

Description

Within the first 24 hours of the outbreak of war in . .Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Along with their attack on the .

Within the first 24 hours of the outbreak of war in . Start by marking First 24 Hours of War in the Pacific as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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Military historian Donald J. Young takes the reader to eleven Pacific sites where war is about to change everything. We are with more marines in North China, embassy guards, who must surrender or die on the spot. The bugler sounds Retreat for one last time and then breaks his bugle across his knee and hurls it away.

success on that first day spelled doom to both armies.

Although it took 70 days to take Malaya and Singapore, and 6 months to take the Philippines, results of their success on that first day spelled doom to both armies. First 24 Hours of War in the Pacific covers the story of that first day, including the attack on Midway, what happened in Shanghai, to the . Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Twenty-four hours and two minutes later, at 1:32p. Washington time, the Congress of the United States officially declared war on the Empire of Japan. ISBN13:9781572492455. Release Date:June 2001.

Though the book is short, the author manages to say a great deal about the opening day of the Pacific Wa.

Though the book is short, the author manages to say a great deal about the opening day of the Pacific War. Each of the dozen chapters deals with a different place, such as Shanghai, Wake, Washington, and Malaya. Valuable for anyone interested in the Pacific War.

The Pacific War Papers is an annotated collection of extremely rare .

The Pacific War Papers is an annotated collection of extremely rare Japanese primary-source documents. The late Katherine V. Dillon, Donald M. Goldstein and the late Gordon W. Prange created numerous World War II classics, including At Dawn We Slept; Miracle at Midway; and God’s Samurai: Lead Pilot at Pearl Harbor (Brassey’s, In. reprint 2003). It is also first person source material from the Japanese side not a historian telling you what one can interpret from the written documents. The book is mostly pre-Pearl Harbor attack, but the third section does have stuff on the later war years as in the Truk Lagoon fiasco.

D-DAYS IN THE PACIFIC ALSO BY DONALD L. MILLER The Story of World War . MILLER The Story of World War II City of the Century: The Epic of Chicago and the Making of America Lewis Mumford, A Life The Lewis. I would probably not be writing about World War II had it not been for a nudge from the documentary film producer, Lou Reda. The Pacific war was not exclusively a war over oil, but oil played a decisive role in both its origins and end. The road to war.

The War of the Pacific (Spanish: Guerra del Pacífico), also known as the Saltpeter War (Spanish: Guerra del salitre) and by multiple other names, was a war between Chile and a Bolivian–Peruvian alliance

The War of the Pacific (Spanish: Guerra del Pacífico), also known as the Saltpeter War (Spanish: Guerra del salitre) and by multiple other names, was a war between Chile and a Bolivian–Peruvian alliance. It lasted from 1879 to 1884, and was fought over Chilean claims on coastal Bolivian territory in the Atacama Desert. The war ended with victory for Chile, which gained a significant amount of resource-rich territory from Peru and Bolivia

After Guadalcanal the Pacific War that had been moving south toward moa turned north . Secretary of War, hated him; so did Winston Churchill and Field-Marshal Sir Alan Brooke and Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham.

After Guadalcanal the Pacific War that had been moving south toward moa turned north toward Japan, and the United States, having been starved for victory, never again tasted defeat. 1 Nevertheless, Admiral King continued to express the wish that was anathema in the ears of these men, as it was also irritating or at least unwelcome in the ears of General George Marshall, the .

Within the first 24 hours of the outbreak of war in the Pacific, the Japanese launched attacks against every major military installation and base that stood in the way of their gaining their primary wartime objective -- the capture of Malaya and the Dutch East Indies. Along with their attack on the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor, they included pre-invasion attacks on Malaya, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Wake, and Guam, followed by major land invasions of both Hong Kong and Malaya that same day.What the Japanese were able to accomplish within that first 24 hours would take the Allies over three years to get back. The only two places where the British and Americans stood a chance of holding back the Japanese was in Malaya and the Philippines. Although it took 70 days to take Malaya and Singapore, and 6 months to take the Philippines, results of their success on that first day spelled doom to both armies.First 24 Hours of War in the Pacific covers the story of that first day, including the attack on Midway, what happened in Shanghai, to the U.S. Marines in North China on the USS Lexington, and in Washington, D.C.It focuses on the almost unbelievable success the Japanese had in launching attacks over an area covering nearly one-fourth of the earth's surface within a single 24-hour period in December of 1941.

Comments

Brariel Brariel
Excellent purchase and am happy with
Majin Majin
Military historian Donald J. Young takes the reader to eleven Pacific sites where war is about to change everything. He puts us on doomed Wake Island where Major Devereaux is ordering his Marine bugler to sound "Call to Arms" as an invasion force looms offshore and bombs devestate. We are with more marines in North China, embassy guards, who must surrender or die on the spot. The bugler sounds "Retreat" for one last time and then breaks his bugle across his knee and hurls it away. We are aboard the PanAm flying boat "China Clipper" as it desperately tries to flee Wake Island already under attack. We are on indefensible Guam when an ill-equipped handful of American Marines, mindful that no U.S. Marine unit has ever gone down without a fight, march off to make a stand agasinst an invasion force of 5000. The Marines are armed with 1903 Springfield rifles, two .30 caliber machine guns, and a few.45 sidearms. They are assisted by Insular Guards, native Chamorros who also carry ought three Springfields but theirs are stamped ""Do not shoot. For training purposes only." We are at Clark Field in the Phillipines where B-17s are caught on the ground by aerial raiders. We are abandoning the ill-fated 2100 ton lumber schooner "Cynthia Olsen" torpedoed and sinking off Hawaii, the first U.S. merchantman to be sunk in World War Two but not the last. Reading this book will remind you how lucky we are there can never be another be another Pearl Harbor. Oh, sure! (review taken from my review in"Vapor Trails", news letter of the Mass. Chapter of the 8th Air Force Historical Society of which I am editor and publisher.)
Painwind Painwind
As the title suggests, Young explains how on 7 December 1941 the Japanese initiated the Pacific war not only by attacking Pearl Harbor but also by launching coordinated assaults on Malaya, Hong Kong, the island of Guam, the Philippines, Wake Island, Midway Island, and U.S assets in Shanghai and near Peking in China. Although it is only 176 pages, it is a fascinating book because its narrow focus allows it to explain in some detail those events which are usually glossed over, if indeed they are mentioned at all, in more general histories. That said, I have omitted one star (perhaps unfairly) because I feel that the book would have been even better if twice as long.

This book makes an excellent companion to 'Pearl Harbor' by Steven M. Gillon, which focuses on how FDR reacted to events during this same period.
Goltikree Goltikree
Most of us associate the beginning of World War II with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Actually, Pearl Harbor was only one of numerous attacks carried out by the Japanese that day. Their true objectives were the mines of Malaya and the oil fields of Borneo--Pearl Harbor was a side-show which was necessary to keep the United States from interfering.
In this book Donald J. Young vividly describes the other events of December 7, 1941, giving minute by minute details seldom found elsewhere. He describes the inept responses of our (U.S. and British) military forces to attacks which should not have come as any surprise, but did. In the last chapter, he fills us in on the reaction in Washington, where the Japanese attacks may actually have solved a problem for President Roosevelt.
For the serious WW II historian this is a valuable book. For the casual reader this is an interesting and entertaining book, particularly if you are already aware of some of the controversy surrounding the events of the day.