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eBook Ten Days That Shook the World ePub

eBook Ten Days That Shook the World ePub

by N. K. Krupskaya,John Howard Lawson,V. I. Lenin,John Reed

  • ISBN: 0717802000
  • Category: Russia
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: N. K. Krupskaya,John Howard Lawson,V. I. Lenin,John Reed
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Intl Pub; Revised edition (March 1, 1982)
  • ePub book: 1836 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1522 kb
  • Other: docx mobi lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 384

Description

Ten Days That Shook the World (1919) is a book by the American journalist and socialist John Reed about the October Revolution in Russia in 1917, which Reed experienced firsthand

Ten Days That Shook the World (1919) is a book by the American journalist and socialist John Reed about the October Revolution in Russia in 1917, which Reed experienced firsthand. Reed followed many of the prominent Bolshevik leaders closely during his time in Russia. John Reed died in 1920, shortly after the book was finished, and he is one of the few Americans buried at the Kremlin Wall Necropolis in Moscow, a site normally reserved only for the most prominent Soviet leaders.

Transcriber’s Remarks. THIS book is a slice of intensified history-history as I saw it. Ten Days that Shook the World was the title John Reed gave his remarkable book. It presents a wonderfully vivid and forceful description of the first days of the October Revolution.

This etext was produced by Normal Wolcott. Ten Days that Shook the World. Harvard University accepted a commissioned portrait of Reed in 1935 from a group of his classmates and hung it in Adams House, site of the boarding house where Reed lived at Harvard.

October: Ten Days That Shook the World is a 1928 Soviet silent historical film by Sergei Eisenstein and Grigori Aleksandrov. It is a celebratory dramatization of the 1917 October Revolution commissioned for the tenth anniversary of the event.

John Reed, who witnessed ‘the chaos of revolution’. After the first world war, the Bolshevik revolution of 1917 was the next great event of the 20th century to capture the literary imagination. After this first, thrilling encounter with revolution (Reed also met both Lenin and Trotsky), Reed and Bryant returned to the US, and became trapped in a succession of bruising lawsuits inspired by the American authorities’ fear of Bolshevism. Reed’s life at this time was every bit as dramatic as the world from which he had just returned. All his papers from his Russian trip were confiscated, and would not be returned for seven months.

At mid-twentieth century, November 7, 1917, was a much more recent event. Moreover, in the wake of the Revolution the Soviet Union had become a major world power, and a system of socialist states had emerged.

John Reed’s book will undoubtedly help to clear this question, which is the fundamental .

John Reed’s book will undoubtedly help to clear this question, which is the fundamental problem of the international labor movement. See 1 question about Ten Days that Shook the Worl. ists with This Book. Jul 22, 2008 Ty rated it liked it. I just finished this one, after meaning to check it out since college. John Reed, a Portland born American journalist covered most of the chaotic events of the October Revolution, including the attack on the Winter Palace, where the y Whites where defeated by the Bolsheviks.

Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Addeddate.

Instead, a power struggle ensued after Lenin's demise and the Soviet Union was plunged into a dark hole from which many of the key characters of this book did not emerge.

John Reed's firsthand report on the early days of the Bolshevik Revolution includes an introduction br Nikolai Lenin

Comments

Boraston Boraston
There are countless reviews of this book out there. In short, it does an excellent job of conveying the feeling of the Russian Revolution for those that were there. The author's politics are seriously misguided and he was blind to many of the realities of what was going on, but that is part of what makes the book important - it helps one to see how an otherwise intelligent and insightful person can get caught up in a movement such as this.

Wonderful descriptions of the personalities and events, but if you don't already have a basic understanding of what took place, it can be a difficult read.
Gldasiy Gldasiy
Frankly, I don't know quite what I expected from this book beyond a better understanding of Russia's tumultuous history. The book reads as a novel-esque documentary and (for me) 'fell between two stools', failing as a novel and boring as a documentary. Great if you want every nuance of this reporter's experience, but don't go there if you're looking for a gripping storyline or a clear, bullet-point record covering this chain of events.
Hiylchis Hiylchis
This is not the easiest book to read and desparately needed editing before being published. John Reed, being an American socialist journalist, was obviously biased although he occasionally tried to hide it. John Reed's account is also confusing in many places trying to distinguish the various factions in play during the Bolshevik Revolution. Under normal circumstances this could rate as maybe two or three stars.

So why am I being "generous" with five stars?

There were factors that contributed to the "sloppiness" of this book. The US Government confiscated Reed's notes when he returned to the US and he fought for seven months to get his notes back. Once he got the notes he went into seclusion. If the book reads like something that was slapped together in around ten days it is because the book was slapped together in around ten days. Given the circumstances the book was a good eye witness account of the turbulent days of the events in Petrograd, Moscow, and other parts of Russia in November 1917.

Regardless of what one may think of Lenin, Trotsky, Kerensky, Korilov, and other important players in the revolution these individuals and others played a critical role in a critical event that "shook the world". The book is especially interesting as it relays the hopes of the individuals in the early days of the revolution that was admittedly tense, confusing, and at times brutal. When the book was written Russia was in the second year of a civil war between Russian "Whites" and Russian "Reds". If the Whites had won then this book would have been just a footnote in the annals of political journalism. But the Reds won and what Reed witnessed turned out to be the start of something big that was to be a major impact on the world for decades to come.

The book was also written by an American socialist journalist whose opinion was framed in the hopes and dreams of the Russian proletariat. It is not tainted by the harsh and brutal reality that was to occur in the post-Lenin Russia as Reed -- who died in 1920 -- had no idea of what the future would be. He thought many wonderful things will happen as a result the revolution. Instead, a power struggle ensued after Lenin's demise and the Soviet Union was plunged into a dark hole from which many of the key characters of this book did not emerge.

It is also interesting that one of the book's harshest critics was Josef Stalin. Stalin was treated as a peripheral character who is mention maybe twice in the entire book. To make matters worse one of Stalin's bitterest rival, Leon Trotsky, emerges as one of the stars of the revolution without whom it probably would have failed. Stalin was to ensured Soviet historical accounts did not repeat that transgression.

Regardless of what one may think of Communism and Socialism this is a critical book that accounts for the very earliest days of the Soviet Union. It is not the easiest book to read but it is worth the effort.
Malalrajas Malalrajas
This book is by a committed Communist, John Reed. (Mr. Reed is the only American who is buried in the Kremlin. Definitely, a singular honor.) This book is a good walk through the chaos of the takeover of the Duma by the Bolsheviks. It covers Mr. Reed's steps as he reports (& occasionally participates) in the Russian Revolution.

For further reading, I suggest "History of the Russian Revolution", by Leon Trotsky.
Beahelm Beahelm
It was an interesting read but it was redundant at the last third of the book which was tiring to read and rehash old thoughts
Very Old Chap Very Old Chap
Difficult to read as the subject matter of the revolution was very complex. The reader is exposed to all of the complexities, confusion, chaos, propaganda as it happened. How a strong country emerged out of such enormous chaos and fighting between hundreds of groups, committees, unions, military units, commercial interests etc is difficult to comprehend.
Najinn Najinn
This excellent eyewitness account of the first days of the Bolshevik Revolution refutes the professional anticommunists' assertion that Lenin intended to establish an oppressive authoritarian regime with a centralized economy. The exact opposite was in fact true. Political and economic power was to be disbursed among workers and peasants soviets or councils.
Review for formatting only not content. This particular version is very strangely formatted. It’s missing a publisher and table of contents. The justification is off in places. The footnotes are oddly misplaced within the body of the text. Quotation marks are missing which make it impossible to read. I’m returning for a ‘real’ version of the same book.