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eBook Worlds That Passed (The Modern Jewish Experience) ePub

eBook Worlds That Passed (The Modern Jewish Experience) ePub

by Abraham S. Sachs,H. Berman,J. Joffe

  • ISBN: 0405067461
  • Category: Russia
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Abraham S. Sachs,H. Berman,J. Joffe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Arno Press; Facsimile of 1928 ed edition (December 1975)
  • Pages: 293
  • ePub book: 1608 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1263 kb
  • Other: lit azw rtf mbr
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 471

Description

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Abraham H. Foxman (Author). I recommend this book, but not only for the illumination of non-Jews seeking to understand the Jewish perspective but particularly to Jews that have fall prey to the notion that some strains of Antisemitism is not only justified and acceptable, but right. 7 people found this helpful.

Just recall the caveat above

Just recall the caveat above. A very worthwhile bibliography is also provided for the layman who wants to study further.

The Jews of Modern France (Jewish Communities in the Modern World)

The Jews of Modern France (Jewish Communities in the Modern World). Although technically the focus of this book is on social history, it is also an important contribution to the history of Jewish religion in the USSR.

Abraham Maslow is one of the most influential psychologists of the twentieth century. His biggest contributions to psychology were his contributions to humanistic psychology as well as his development of the hierarchy of needs. Maslow’s career in psychology greatly predated the modern positive psychology movement, but it might not look the same were it not for him. This article will discuss some of his formative experiences, his contributions to psychology, and his work’s relationship to the positive psychology movement. This article contains: Early Life, Education, and Formative Experiences.

The first Jewish population in the region to be later known as Germany came with the Romans to the city now known as Cologne. A "Golden Age" in the first millennium saw the emergence of the Ashkenazi Jews, while the persecution and expulsion that followed the Crusades led to the creation of Yiddish and an overall shift eastwards.

The modern Jewish history of South Africa began, indirectly, some time before the .

The modern Jewish history of South Africa began, indirectly, some time before the discovery of the Cape of Good Hope, by the participation of certain astronomers and cartographers in the Portuguese discovery of the sea-route to India.

The Modern Jewish Experience. e argues for the importance of performers, both professional and amateur, in a historical record that has typically favored intellectuals and political activists a Deeply Engaging and Insightful Book.

Modern Judaism provides a distinctive, interdisciplinary forum for discussion of the modern Jewish experience since the Haskalah, the Jewish Enlightenment. Its contributors address topics pertinent to the understanding of Jewish life today and the forces that have shaped that experience, including the Zionist movement and the establishment of the State of Israel, the socio-political role assumed by literary works of art, and the rise of modern anti-Semitism and its devastating climax in the Holocaust.

Gurock foregrounds his engaging book against his own experiences as a basketball player, coach, and . Jeffrey S. Gurock uses the experience of sports to illuminate an important mode of modern Jewish religious conflict and accommodation to America.

Gurock foregrounds his engaging book against his own experiences as a basketball player, coach, and marathon runner. He considers the defensive strategies American Jewish leaders have employed in response to sports' challenges to identity, such as using temple and synagogue centers, complete with gymnasiums and swimming pools, to attract the athletically inclined to Jewish life.

Acclaimed journalist Seth Lipsky gives us the fascinating story of a man of profound contradictions: an avowed socialist who wrote fiction with transcendent sympathy for a wealthy manufacturer, an internationalist who turned against the anti-Zionism of the left, an assimilationist whose final battle was against religious apostasy. Lipsky’s Cahan is a prism through which to understand the paradoxes and transformations of the American Jewish experience.