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eBook PRELUDE TO THE REVOLUTION: THE MURDER OF RASPUTIN ePub

eBook PRELUDE TO THE REVOLUTION: THE MURDER OF RASPUTIN ePub

by Ronald C. Moe

  • ISBN: 159330711X
  • Category: Russia
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Ronald C. Moe
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Aventine Press (October 28, 2011)
  • Pages: 726
  • ePub book: 1374 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1313 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi azw docx
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 647

Description

Ironically, the murder of Rasputin that precipitated the royal family's doom was committed by royalists who .

Ironically, the murder of Rasputin that precipitated the royal family's doom was committed by royalists who intended to save the monarchy by their actions. Beginning with the days leading up to the Russian entrance into World War I, Moe takes us through the turbulent events in Russia that changed the world in which we now live. Brilliantly written, and thoroughly documented, Dr. Moe has given us a profound look into one of the most misunderstood sagas in the 20th Century.

Prelude to the Revolution book. The murder of Rasputin and the dissolution of the Romanov monarchy were events of extraordinary significance during the early Twentieth Century with consequences continuing to the present day nearly a century later.

The murder of rasputin. Prelude To The Revolution. Rasputin and his admirers, 1915. From this bed Rasputin wrote telegrams to the Tsar and Tsarina pleading against entering the war. By. Ronald C. Moe. Prelude to the revolution: the murder of rasputin. Far left standing is Sana Pistolkors and her husband, Alexander. Chionia Guseva. Disfigured lady, under Iliodors instructions, stabbed Rasputin in Pokrovskoe on 28 June 1914.

In Prelude to the Revolution, Ronald C. Moe reveals the true story of what happened on that dark night in December 1916 . Moe reveals the true story of what happened on that dark night in December 1916 is revealed. Prelude to the Revolution tells the incredible story of the dissolution of tsarist Russia and the murder of Rasputin, the ‘Holy Devil’ whose murder sealed its fate and paved the way for the rise of communism. com UK. Olga Vladislavovna Taratynova, the Director of the Tsarskoye Selo State Museum, with Dr. Moe’s book.

Moe, Ronald C. (2011). The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin. A Conspiracy That Brought Down the Russian Empire. Nelipa, Margarita (2010). Smith, Douglas (2016).

The Decision to Murder Rasputin on the Crest Stumbling Toward Revolution The Duma Erupts Last Warnings.

Ronald C. Preface Table of Contents Introduction I. St. Petersburg – 1903 A Special Visitor The Romanov Family Nicholas and Alexandra Canonization of Serafim. The Decision to Murder Rasputin on the Crest Stumbling Toward Revolution The Duma Erupts Last Warnings. 429 436 451 459. IX. Death in the Cellar Felix Gathers Conspirators Vanya Has Arrived December 16th Murder By Degrees.

How was Russian mystic Rasputin murdered? . Mystery still shrouds Rasputin's last moments The violence and chaos of the revolution and Bolshevik terror make Rasputin's words sound prophetic: "Without me everything will collapse.

How was Russian mystic Rasputin murdered? 31 December 2016. Mystery still shrouds Rasputin's last moments. The violence and chaos of the revolution and Bolshevik terror make Rasputin's words sound prophetic: "Without me everything will collapse. He had also predicted his own murder, in a letter to Nicholas II.

The Interior Minister launched an investigation into the disappearance and then murder of Rasputin, which was run by General Pyotr Popov

They reportedly gave him the option to kill himself but he refused and allegedly fired a shot at one of the grand dukes instead. The Interior Minister launched an investigation into the disappearance and then murder of Rasputin, which was run by General Pyotr Popov. An autopsy carried out by Dr Dmitry Kosorotov found that Rasputin had been shot three times – one shot was on the left side of his chest, one in his back and the fatal shot was in his forehead.

Grigoriy Rasputin, the infamous ‘mad monk’ and close friend of the last Russian emperor and his family, was murdered on. .Later in Europe, Rayner helped Yusupov translate Yusupov’s first book on the murder of Rasputin. It’s rumored they may have shaped the story to fit their needs.

Grigoriy Rasputin, the infamous ‘mad monk’ and close friend of the last Russian emperor and his family, was murdered on December 17th, 1916. Prince Felix Yusupov, Count Sumarokov-Elston (1887 - 1967).

This is the story of the dissolution of the mighty empire of the Russian Tsars and of the man, Grigory Rasputin, whose murder sealed its fate. The reader will be fascinated with all the amazing elements in this saga of political dissolution; occultism, police conspiracies, high-stakes diplomacy, duels, romance, court intrigue, war, and ultimately murder and national tragedy. And it is all true and documented. This is not a novel. The murder of Rasputin and the dissolution of the Romanov monarchy were events of extraordinary significance during the early Twentieth Century with consequences continuing to the present day nearly a century later. The author, Ronald C. Moe, describes Russia under Nicholas II (1894-1917) with its fascination for mysticism, commitment to the fine arts, especially ballet, rapid industrial growth, and the political struggles and progress toward achieving a working constitutional monarchy. All this was placed at risk by Russia's involvement in World War I and especially by the presence of a staretz ("holy man") near the throne bringing it into disrepute. When all the efforts to remove Rasputin from the Imperial presence failed, the rich, handsome, Prince Felix Yusupov, married to the Tsar's niece, determined to organize a conspiracy to murder Rasputin. While the tale of Rasputin's murder has been told many times in books and movies, much of what is written and screened is the stuff of half-truths and legends. The reader will be introduced here to the true story of what happened that dark night in December 1916; who was involved in the conspiracy, the role of British agents that night, who fired the fatal shots, why the main conspirators kept the secrets of what actually happened until their deaths, and why the murder was much more important to world history than generally believed. The reader is invited to join the author in reliving one of the crucial events in world history.

Comments

Nagis Nagis
Ronald C. Moe, the author of Prelude to the Revolution: The Murder of Rasputin, was for more than 25 years my colleague at the Congressional Research Service of the U.S. Library of Congress, where he was a recognized expert on U.S. executive branch organization and operations. It was no surprise, therefore, that when I entered his office I might find him immersed in some ponderous government report such as that of the Commission on the Organization of the Government for the Conduct of Foreign Policy. On those same occasions, however, I was equally likely to observe a pile of books on pre-revolutionary imperial Russia during the first years of the 20th century.

It was out of respect for my former colleague as well as because of my own passing interest in the subject that I opened Dr. Moe’s book, but I did so, I admit, with some question about what I was getting myself into. It comprises perhaps 550 pages of text—relatively small print filling large pages; even so, I was pleasantly surprised at how readable the book is. It does require the reader’s attention, but the investment is well worth the effort because the book is highly informative and probably authoritative in two different respects. (I say “probably” because I’m not knowledgeable enough to make such a judgment myself.)

As its title suggests, Prelude to the Revolution is an insightful analytical history of the factors that led to the decay and ultimate disintegration of the imperial Russian empire. The author discusses the personalities of the principal participants in this process, especially the Emperor and the Empress, but also the economic, social and military forces that influenced it. On this score, I found his arguments to be interesting and persuasive but, as I’ve said, I’m hardly a scholar of the subject.

Not surprisingly, the book’s sub-title, “The Murder of Rasputin,” identifies an equally important theme of the book. Strikingly, the sub-title appears in larger print than the title on both the book’s cover and the spine. This may have been the publisher’s way of trying to sell copies by emphasizing the murder theme, but it also could reflect the author’s ambivalence about the relative importance of the two dimensions of his research. In any case, he provides a detailed presentation and analysis of what we know and what we don’t know about the death of Rasputin. There are many unanswered questions that probably never can be answered. I think, though, that Moe presents the available information carefully and dispassionately; he assesses the various theories that other authors have presented while offering his own conclusions about who did what and why. Others may disagree with his position but few would argue that he treats those of others unfairly.

This book obviously was a labor of love. Moe didn’t write it to build his case for academic tenure or promotion or to advance his career in any other way. In the preface, he explains how his interest in Russian history could be traced back to a high school course in world history and how it continued throughout his adult life. He and his wife “traveled many times to Russia and visited most of the sites described in this book.” “As the years passed,” however, he “realized that this book would be a retirement project. And so it has been.” I’m sure it must have been immensely satisfying to him to have been able finally to devote his full attention to it. The result will be sure to satisfy any reader with an interest in Russia and an appreciation of careful research.

If I have any quibble about the book, it is that it could have benefited from a more careful and demanding editor. First, too often little glitches appear in the text which, even though of minimal importance individually, do become a bit distracting collectively. The author and his text deserved better. And second, Moe seems to have been reluctant to exclude anything that he found interesting or important about the events and individuals involved in the complex story he tells. His editor might have persuaded him that some things could be eliminated in order to produce a text that would have been a bit more accessible to more readers. But perhaps not; this was, after all, a labor of love.
Ariurin Ariurin
I was a graduate student with Ron at Columbia University in the 1960s. Over the years when we would occasionally chat he would mention the Czar and Russia. It was only after he passed away that I learned about this book. It is a well-researched and documented study of this period of history that shows the fine application of the political research protocols that we learned. Thank you Ron.
JoJogar JoJogar
For almost 100 years, the enigmatic Russian "holy man," Grigory Rasputin, has been the source material for dozens of histories, novels, movies, and television documentaries. Legends have swirled around this debauched monk, only to be trumped by more fanciful myths. In Prelude to the Revolution: The Death of Rasputin, Dr. Ronald Moe has written what I believe future historians will judge to be the final word on the mystery. A lifelong interest in the subject, facilitated by his many years in research at the Library of Congress, Dr. Moe has written with exhaustive inquiry and a powerfully argued analysis of what really happened in those fateful and final days of the Romanov dynasty.

Many different pressures existed upon the tsar and tsarina in the days leading up to the end. The German invasion in 1914 not only threw the nation into a bloody war, but also caused the overtaxed Nicholas to leave his throne in Petrograd to lead the Russian armies at the front. Inner turmoil and incompetence in the Duma and the bureaucracy led to ineffective and weak central government. The Bolsheviks and other revolutionary movements were afoot. But at the focal point of the collapse of the monarchy were the rumors swirling throughout the nation of the "Dark Forces" thought to be centered in the person of Rasputin. The tsarina, Alexandra, and many of her court were captivated by this peasant's apparent supernatural healing powers, by which he had inserted himself into the inner circle of power.

Ironically, the murder of Rasputin that precipitated the royal family's doom was committed by royalists who intended to save the monarchy by their actions. Beginning with the days leading up to the Russian entrance into World War I, Moe takes us through the turbulent events in Russia that changed the world in which we now live. Brilliantly written, and thoroughly documented, Dr. Moe has given us a profound look into one of the most misunderstood sagas in the 20th Century. I highly recommend the book for students of history like myself, and professional historians as well.

Robert C. Beasley, Asheville, North Carolina
Adjunct Professor of Church History and Biblical Theology, Reformed International Theological Seminary, Donets'k, Ukraine.