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eBook The Explorers ePub

eBook The Explorers ePub

by Timothy Flannery

  • ISBN: 0753809036
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Timothy Flannery
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Phoenix Press (December 2, 1999)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1341 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1461 kb
  • Other: docx lrf azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 611

Description

Timothy Fridtjof Flannery FAA (born 28 January 1956) is an Australian mammalogist, palaeontologist, environmentalist, conservationist, explorer, and public scientist.

Timothy Fridtjof Flannery FAA (born 28 January 1956) is an Australian mammalogist, palaeontologist, environmentalist, conservationist, explorer, and public scientist. Having discovered more than 30 mammal species (including new species of tree kangaroos), he served as the Chief Commissioner of the Climate Commission, a Federal Government body providing information on climate change to the Australian public.

Flannery, Timothy Fridtjof. Emma Gordon Williams has been tireless in her efforts to locate the most obscure works.

The explorers of Australia tell an epic story of courage and suffering, of. .

The explorers of Australia tell an epic story of courage and suffering, of dispossession and conquest, of a moving frontier between European invaders and the Aboriginal custodians of the continent. How do I upload a book?

Find nearly any book by TIMOTHY FLANNERY.

Find nearly any book by TIMOTHY FLANNERY. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers.

Tremper High School, Kenosha, WI.

Flannery is a paleontologist turned global warming activist, and it seems that he wrote this book in separate parts wearing these different hats. Flannery paints a broad tapestry that I have not seen described so ably in one place.

Noting that Flannery's book "offers adventure and exotica," Philip Herbst in Booklist concluded that Throwim Way Leg is.Flannery once told CA: "I was named For the Norwegian polar explorer and humanitarian Fridtjof Nansen

Noting that Flannery's book "offers adventure and exotica," Philip Herbst in Booklist concluded that Throwim Way Leg is "a highly readable narrative. Writing in Sierra, Rebecca Shotwell stated: "Flannery combines diligent science, heart-pounding adventure, and a respect for ancient cultures to create a compelling tale. Flannery once told CA: "I was named For the Norwegian polar explorer and humanitarian Fridtjof Nansen. In the tradition of nineteenth century endeavor, I would like to think I am a terror to my enemies and an ornament to my nation. Above all I should like to be considered a patriot. Biographical and critical sources: Periodicals.

Place of Publication. Born in 1956, Tim Flannery is the director of the South Australian Museum in Adelaide. North America Paperback Original Antiquarian & Collectable Books. He was previously visiting Professor of Australian Studies at Harvard. Country of Publication. Flannery O'Connor Paperback Books Travel. This item doesn't belong on this page.

Hard to rate this book as a work of the author because of course Tim Flannery only compiled a raft of extracts from the diaries of various early explores

Hard to rate this book as a work of the author because of course Tim Flannery only compiled a raft of extracts from the diaries of various early explores. While the individual extracts are interesting enough in their own right, when compiled, a sameness comes over them as to render continued reading more of a chore than an enjoyment.

The Explorers : Stories of Discovery and Adventure from the Australian Frontier.

Comments

Dakora Dakora
It always amazes me that so many of these old exploration books are out of print. I'd like to see so many of them brought out again, in edited form, and published again. This was real-life adventure back before every square centimeter of the earth was cataloged and put in a global database, cross-indexed and matrixed.

All the selections were good, except maybe a couple of the last ones in the second half of the 20th century. The age of exploration was pretty much over by the turn of the 20th. The last selection in the book was real Sunday newspaper magazine tripe. Can't help but wonder what another book would be like, one that made the selections for reasons solely of drama and novelty instead of for this bleeding-heart Leftist agenda Flannery seems to have.

The intros to each selection provide good info but they also contain obnoxious material that's patronizing to both the reader and the aborigines he makes such a big fuss about caring for. Maybe this book was originally intended as a text book for 12 years olds? Even worse, a few of the intros contain spoilers about the entries they introduce! It's like he ran out of preachy things to say about the aborigines so he tells us how to feel about the suspense and drama to come. In other words, he has a compulsion to tell the reader how to feel about things. Gross!

My advice to someone buying this book is to read the entries themselves and skip the intros until you've finished the book, if at all.

This book made me seek out a couple other titles by Flannery, old explorer books edited by him. One by Watkin Tench and another by Matthew Flinders. Any port in a storm. I hate reading PDFs on my laptop (and I've read quite a few) and I don't want to invest in an eReader.

As for my feelings about aborigines: I hate civilization and I admire primitive peoples almost to exaltation.
Frei Frei
This is an anthology of excerpts from Australian Explorers journals ranging from early sixteenth century European Explorers to Australians in the early 20th century. Flannery's introduction for each provides an excellent, concise biography and set up to each explorer's excerpt. In many of the excerpts, an explorer faces death and disaster. The most intriguing initially was Charles Sturt writing of his attempt to find the mythical lake in the center of Australia. He brings a boat, experiences weather so hot it bursts a thermometer his party carries, they suffer from extreme scurvy, and Sturt's desire to be the first to reach the center of Australia. The second explorer I read in this collection was Ernest Giles. His except focuses on an expedition with his assistant Gibson, who goes for help and manages to get lost, and then Giles slowly makes his way back to base camp. Reading The Explorers fascinated me enough that I wanted to read more about specific explorers like Giles, but also about Australian explorers in general.
Undeyn Undeyn
When I studied history for matriculation in New South Wales back in 1958-1959, there was no subject available to me called "Australian History". The two history subjects available were Ancient History and Modern History. Modern History was, in fact, the history of modern Europe. These days, it seems inconceivable that the school system at matriculation level back then could completely ignore the history of Australia, and the history of its nearest neighbours. Although the European settlement of Australia is relatively recent, the Aboriginal history of Australia covers millennia. The former received scant attention in earlier school years, the latter, none at all. (One presumes that Australian history is now accorded the place it deserves in the school curriculum, and receives a fuller and more balanced treatment). Because of this background, I found Tim Flannery's book of enormous interest. The meagre Australian history once taught consisted of drawing maps of the routes taken by explorers, and little else, or so it seems to fading memory. Tim Flannery relates his own experience: "The men were just names, their journeys snail-trails across paper. No attempt was made to bring exploring to life, perhaps because the inconvenient details about Aborigines and barren wastes would have simply got in the way of the main message: that the Europeans had triumphed". We are indebted to Tim Flannery for redressing the balance in this book, in the course of which we can read some superb writing that would otherwise be hard to come by. Some Australian history may be dull, but the history of exploration, as told by the explorers themselves, is instructive, exciting, and still relevant.
ZloyGenii ZloyGenii
This book consists of brief excerpts from journals, letters and diaries of those foolish or brave enough to push beyond the known world along Australia's seaboards.
These explorers demonstrated unfathomable foolishness, unquenchable curiosity, bullheaded ethnocentricity, and, in too few cases, a passion for discovery for its own sake. As a reader you will be horrified, entertained, and enlightened by their adventures and misadventures.
I just returned from a trip to Australia and took this book along with me to read. It was perfect for a visitor with little knowledge of Australian history beyond Hughes' "Fatal Shore" (another great read).
Shezokha Shezokha
The book was short, almost too short for my mind, but that made it very accessible as well. This is basically a readers digest condensed version of Tench's 19th century classic, but a worthy starting point for the casual or young reader.
GEL GEL
While I have already read several of the Explorer's Journals, I think Tim has extracted some particularly significant, illustrative, often poignant moments in each of the extracts. An interesting way to read history.
Lemana Lemana
This book provides some wonderfully illuminating insights into the minds of the early explorers of this vast continent. It is good to read of some of the lesser known explorers who are almost forgotten in the panoply of exploration.

Highly recommended. As is Tim's journey along the Darling-Murray system with John Doyle: "Two men in a Tinnie"