cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War
eBook The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War ePub

eBook The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War ePub

by Andrew Roberts

  • ISBN: 0713999705
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Andrew Roberts
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Allen Lane; First edition (2009)
  • Pages: 808
  • ePub book: 1365 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1192 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 103

Description

The title of the book, The Storm of War, conceals an answer to Roberts’s central question about the reasons .

The title of the book, The Storm of War, conceals an answer to Roberts’s central question about the reasons for the German defeat. The notion of war as a storm summons up the Nazi idea of a blitzkrieg, a lightning victory that would somehow resolve all of the political and economic problems of the German state

With his new book on the Second World War, British historian Andrew Roberts has not only written the single best history of that conflict but .

With his new book on the Second World War, British historian Andrew Roberts has not only written the single best history of that conflict but has also claimed his place as one of our top historians. From "Britain's finest military historian" (The Economist) comes a magisterial new history of World War II and the flawed axis strategy that led to their defeat. What were the factors that affected the war's outcome? Why did the Axis lose?.

Examining the Second World War on every front, Roberts asks whether, with a different decision-making . Andrew Roberts's Masters and Commanders was one of the most acclaimed, bestselling history books of 2008.

Andrew Roberts's Masters and Commanders was one of the most acclaimed, bestselling history books of 2008.

The Storm of War book. From Britain's finest military historian (The Economist) comes.

U N E S C O General History of Africa. Volume I. Methodology and African Prehistory.

At the end of your life, you will never regret not having passed one more test, not winning one more verdict or not closing one more deal. You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, or a parent. U N E S C O General History of Africa. Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. 09 MB·115,041 Downloads·New!

With his new book on the Second World War, British historian Andrew Roberts has not only .

With his new book on the Second World War, British historian Andrew Roberts has not only written the single best history of that conflict but has also claimed his place as one of our top historians, says Michael Korda. It is curious that the two best-known British historians in the United States are Andrew Roberts and Niall Ferguson, each of whom represents, in fact, a different school of serious historical writing, and both of whom seem to have gained for themselves, perhaps without intending to, a special reputation on the American right.

23,000 lives lost every day, or more than six people killed every minute, for six long years. The Western World has been at relative peace since 1945

23,000 lives lost every day, or more than six people killed every minute, for six long years. The Western World has been at relative peace since 1945. But the Europe which existed in 1945 had weathered 5 separate wars, all unleashed by Germany for the past 70 years since Prussian unification in 1864. This war’, Hitler told the Reichstag in 1942, ‘is one of those elemental conflicts which usher in a new millennium and which shake the world. Russia took the brunt of the violence.

Andrew Roberts's global analysis of the Second World War is masterful, says Robert Service. The thread binding the book together is the question of historical contingency. Roberts indicates how often Hitler would have done better, and even won the war, if he had made different choices. This is not an original thought, nor is it claimed as such. No one in 1940 needed to tell Churchill that the Germans stood a good chance of crushing the United Kingdom.

Электронная книга "The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War", Andrew Roberts. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Storm of War: A New History of the Second World War" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Shipped from UK, please allow 10 to 21 business days for arrival. Very Good, A very good, near fine copy,in red cloth boards with a very good, price-clipped dust jacket. The storm of war: a new history of the Second World War. lvi, 711 p., [24] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.. . Includes bibliographical references (p. 648-675) and index.. .

Comments

Shomeshet Shomeshet
As someone with only a general understanding of WWII (I've only recently started reading history on this topic), I found this to be a generally great one-volume history of WWII. Roberts does a nice job of laying out the run-up to war, the brutality of the Pacific and Eastern fronts, and the strengths and weaknesses of the major powers involved in the conflict (with a special emphasis on England, Germany, and the Soviet Union). He makes good use of quotes from primary sources, and I appreciated the inclusion of certain works directly in the text (such as The Writer at War, a book with which I was unfamiliar).

His thesis is that, no matter the superiority of its soldiers or military and strategic processes and (initially) planning, Germany would fail in its attempt to control Europe because its dictator, Hitler, was a true Nazi and, therefore, was ultimately motivated his ideology and not realistic considerations. This mania resulted in massive strategic failures, such as the invasion of the USSR in June 1941 or the German declaration of war on the U.S. following Pearl Harbor, as well as tactical errors (for example, it was more important that German troops "stand and die" than strategically retreat because, among other things, Hitler believed what mattered was the will of the troops, which would supposedly be more crucial to the outcome than other, more "conventional" factors such as logistics and concentration of forces).

In addition to giving a lot of attention to Hitler's psyche, and his dominance of the German military command (along with that command's moral cravenness), Roberts explores the interaction between the political and military leaders on the Allied side. Although this is not a detailed analysis, given the breadth of the overall subject, it reveals both the greatness of the vision (e.g., Churchill's commitment to resisting German aggression) and the petty ambitions that hindered the Ally effort (e.g., U.S. General Mark Clark's failure to eliminate or greatly reduce the retreating German troops in Italy because he wanted the prestige of being the first Allied commander to enter an Axis capitol).

There are three weaknesses in the book, two of which are significant but one of those is solely a Kindle issue. The less-important defect is that sometimes, most notably in some of the later chapters, Roberts shoe-horns in some information (usually a revealing anecdote about an important figure such as Hitler) with only the barest connection to the subject at hand. These digressions aren't long (sometimes no more than 2 paragraphs), but they are distracting. It's as if Roberts remembered that he found something interesting and just stuck it in because he remembered it at that moment.

The more significant issue is that this is really a history of the continental war. There are only 3 1/3 chapters on Japan: the first chapter focuses on the aggressions of all the Axis powers leading up to the outbreak of the war, with about a third of the chapter devoted to Japan's imperialistic ambitions; the remaining chapters focus on the Pearl Harbor attack, the Battle of Midway, and the close of the Pacific campaign (Iwo Jima through Nagasaki and the Japanese surrender). Each chapter (or portion thereof) is well-written and fascinating, but there is very little discussion or analysis of Japan's leaders, their ideology, and the way that ideology assisted or hindered its military (including to what extent Japanese soldiers adhered to that ideology--for example, there is no examination of the kamikaze fighters and whether they all willingly went to their deaths). Roberts writes very well about his subject; I just wish he had included more about the Pacific theater.

The final, Kindle-specific problem is that there are some poor transcriptions, leading to incomplete or nonsensical sentences. It is particularly frustrating because these errors become more frequent later in the book, garbling conclusions that Roberts is attempting to make. This is an excellent book and it deserves a better quality Kindle edition.
Burisi Burisi
A solid history with emphasis on the Allies’ effort against Germany (only 2 of 18 chapters devoted to the Pacific War against Japan, one of those largely perfunctory). Solid analysis of why the Axis lost and several interesting notes on individuals in the war.

Unfortunately, the e-book is marred by numerous text formatting errors where sentences are interrupted with repeated text from prior paragraphs/sentences requiring great effort to make sense of what author actually wrote. First time I’ve experienced such shoddy work from Amazon.
Jaiarton Jaiarton
This book is a great read for folks interested the big picture with bits of the back story. The author does a good job of putting numerical statistics into comparative context so you can appreciate impact and consequence.

The book focus is mostly on the European continent with significant Russian front analysis, which I feel was appropriate and informative. The efforts of the US are fairly comprehensive and contrasted well. The Pacific gets far less attention, and is not central.

The author spends a lot of time on Hitler and comparing organizational structures of the Allies and the Axis powers which are very interesting and well done. Could almost be a separate book. Some of his conclusions are pressed a bit redundantly by the end.

I did think that the book could have used another proof read as I often tripped over sentence structure. The frequent use of commas and dashes in long sentences required re-reads to track the subject. Once you get used to the authors style it's easier. It's non- fiction so don't expect elegant style.

It's big and I got through it in less than two weeks so I definitely found it gripping.
Thoginn Thoginn
I've read literally 100 different books on WWII from William Shirer's "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" through books from authors as diverse as Ambrose, Hastings, and others. Almost all of the books, in a variety of ways, imply or even outright claim that the Allies beat the Nazis.

Roberts new book, however, takes a different tack, explaining that Hitler was the cause of the Germany's defeat. But not in the usual way (hubris, arrogance or stupidity). For example, Roberts makes a compelling case that Hitler, though obsessed with details and controlling his Generals, was an amateur strategist. It's almost as if Hitler got lucky defeating Poland, then France, then almost Britain and Russia. He either fired, killed or otherwise intimidated his generals, so they gave him no strategic expertise whatsoever.

One of the more satisfying parts of the book is that it spent a lot of words talking about the Russian Front, something that often gets overlooked by the better histories of WWII. Of course, with a somewhat improved flow of information out of Russia these days, I think historians can provide a more in-depth study of the Eastern Front. It's even more clear to me that Joseph Stalin cared so little about his soldiers, he just sent in wave after wave, while the Germans had limited resources.

Great book, one that should be on the reading list of anyone with a real interest in WWII history.
Mullador Mullador
Good history but in desperate need of editing. The text is a mess in some sections with the same sentence appearing multiple times and run on sentences. Maybe it is just the Kindle version.
Mora Mora
Since retirement, I've read a couple hundred books about WWII.

Andrew Robert's is a good historian, but these 800 pages are filled with documented, informed & very candid opinions of why the allies defeated the axis. The focus here is on national leadership and senior military decision making, it's consequences and missed opportunities.

IMHO, material of this nature is best read after reading considerable amounts of detail battle/campaign descriptions. This context literally puts flesh & bones on the quality of strategic decisions & how they were made.