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eBook Ninety Degrees North: The Quest for the North Pole ePub

eBook Ninety Degrees North: The Quest for the North Pole ePub

by Fergus Fleming

  • ISBN: 0802117252
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Fergus Fleming
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Grove Pr; 1st edition (October 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 496
  • ePub book: 1937 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1262 kb
  • Other: azw doc mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 237

Description

Fergus Fleming was born in 1959 and studied at OxfordUniversity and CityUniversity.

Fergus Fleming was born in 1959 and studied at OxfordUniversity and CityUniversity. His books include Barrow's Boys, Ninety Degrees North, The Sword and the Cross, and Killing Dragons, which was a New York Times Notable Book.

Ninety degrees north. The Quest for the North Pole.

In the mid-nineteenth century the North Pole was a mystery. Fergus Fleming's book is a vivid, witty history of the disasters that ensued

In the mid-nineteenth century the North Pole was a mystery. Some believed that it was an island of basalt in a warm crystal sea. Explorers who tried to penetrate the icy wastes failed or died. Fergus Fleming's book is a vivid, witty history of the disasters that ensued. The new explorers included Elisha Kane, a sickly man and useless commander, who led his team close to death in 1854, and Charles Hall, a printer from Ohio. Hall made the mistake of taking an experienced crew, who refused to commit suicide for him. Their mutiny so enraged Hall that he died of a stroke, and some of his crew escaped south on an ice floe.

Just as Mars is now- the North Pole was a mystery for the 19th Century explorer

Just as Mars is now- the North Pole was a mystery for the 19th Century explorer. This book picks up where the Barrow's Boys leaves off. It introduces you to some ice-clumped lunatics and some heros and heroines of the Northern arena.

In Ninety Degrees North: The Quest for the North Pole, Fergus Fleming reveals that the .

In Ninety Degrees North: The Quest for the North Pole, Fergus Fleming reveals that the early Arctic explorers were as unrelenting as the snow. Robert Macfarlane finds the historian of exploration at the top of his game. For his second and equally popular book, Killing Dragons: The Conquest of the Alps, Fleming ransacked the annals of mountaineering, which furnished him with more tales of stiff-upper-lippism in extreme environments. Ninety Degrees North takes up more or less where Barrow's Boys left off, though it restricts itself to the greatest blank on the map: the Arctic.

Ninety Degrees North book. In the nineteenth century, theories about the North Po Fergus Fleming's captivating histories have taken us to the Alps, to the high seas, and to the heights of human endeavor

Ninety Degrees North book. In the nineteenth century, theories about the North Po Fergus Fleming's captivating histories have taken us to the Alps, to the high seas, and to the heights of human endeavor. Now the acclaimed author of Barrow's Boys and Killing Dragons - a New York Times Notable Book - relates the epic story of the men who stopped at nothing to unravel the mysteries of the North Pole. In the nineteenth century, theories about the North Pole ran rampant.

In the nineteenth century, theories about the North Pole ran rampant. Ninety Degrees North : The Quest for the North Pole.

Ninety Degrees North : The Quest for the North Pole.

Attaining 90 degrees North, the North Pole, has been a quest from around the 16th century to the present. Fergus Fleming's rip-roaring book recounts the efforts made from the mid-19th century to the present, in a wonderfully readable and entertaining style. Whether by sea, sledge or air, and attempted by British, American, German, Austro-Hungarian or Norwegian explorers, the details of each campaign reveal new insights into the arctic environment and human endurance.

The author of Barrow’s Boys offers a fascinating look at the exploration of the Arctic in the nineteenth century. Was it an open sea? Was it a portal to new worlds within the globe?

Ninety degrees North. North Pole - Discovery and exploration, Arctic regions - Discovery and exploration. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The author of Barrow's Boys and Killing Degrees details the incredible journey to the North Pole by a group of intrepid explorers who survived starvation, sickness, and a shipwreck to reach their goal.

Comments

Manona Manona
Fleming has made this territory (arctic exploration) his own. He writes fluently, shrewdly and often wittily. While he celebrates the heroism of these men, he is not afraid to view their motivations with a jaundiced eye and delights in the politics and controversies as much as in the gripping stories of the harrowing treks that mostly stopped short of the North Pole.
He is wonderful on the characters and personalites of the many larger than life characters that made the effort and is especially good in his portrayal of the titanic Peary.
This is the third book of Fleming's I have devoured ravenously; he is an old fashioned master of narrative story-telling. I am ready to suit up and travel hopefully to whatever destination his next opus takes us. Bravo!
(And note the photo of Dr.Cook--a ringer for Rasputin if I'm not mistaken.)
Lanin Lanin
British author Fergus Fleming follows up his extroadinarily entertaining "Barrow's Boys" (about the early 19th century golden age of British exploration) with "Ninety Degrees North," another fascinating portrayal of men driven to go where no one had previously gone before. The narrative of Fleming's book covers the quest to stand literally on top of the world that began in earnest in the wake of the disappearance of British explorer Sir John Franklin while searching for the fabled Northwest Passage in 1845.
Fleming reconts each expedition individually and chronologically, retelling the compelling horrors that befell men such as the hapless George DeLong and Charles Francis Hall. He describes in vivid detail what it was like to exist in a climate where the temperatures sometimes reached 100 degrees below zero. Men watched helplessly as their ships became trapped and slowly crushed by the polar ice pack and faced sledging journeys of hundred of miles with little food or shelter.
Fleming recounts the numerous mistakes that were made both theoretical (the persistant belief that the pole was covered by open water) and pratical (the fact that scurvey continued to haunt the explorers even after they figured out how to stop it).
Slowly but surely, as each expedition added to knowledge about the perils of Arctic travel and technology slowly improved, men penetrated farther north until finally Robert Edwin Peary claimed the ultimate prize in 1909.
Fleming is a gifted writer and storyteller and his book makes for terrific reading in front of a fireplace with a mug of hot chocolate on a cold winter night.
Cogelv Cogelv
I have read Mr. Fleming's other two published works and enjoyed them, so I was looking forward to this new book, since I have always had a fascination with explorations both to the North and South Poles. Happily, this book lived up to my high expectations, and reading it was very interesting and enlightening. Some of the stories in this book I had known from reading other works, but the author presented them very well, so I was not bored with going over something I knew. He has a light touch and it makes the reading go well and the pages turn fairly swiftly. He covers the Peary-Cook controversy quite well, without a lot of nonessential detail, and concludes (rightly, as I feel) that neither man actually made it to the Pole. This is a good book to read before a roaring fire during a snowstorm in winter, and then the reader should go outside for a few minutes into a howling wind and feel, if only for a few frozen seconds, what these hardy men must have endured for months on end. Their accomplishments must astonish us, in a much more sedentary age, and this book helps us to acknowledge their tremendous achievements.
Naktilar Naktilar
Simply one of the best books on the quest for the North Pole. Fleming has done it again. Following success with `Barrows Boys' and `Killing Dragons' Fleming has written the epic compilation of the quest for the North Pole. Although `Arctic Grail did a good job on this subject it had one mighty failing, it concluded with Peary's march to the Pole. Mr. Fleming uses new evidence to show that Pearys and Cooks march to the pole were both illusions and probably outright frauds. Simple analysis of their log books makes this clear. Fleming goes on to write about the many airborne attempts at the pole and the actual successful walking attempt in 1968. Simply the most up to date and wonderful book on the Pole attempts, it covers everything from Franklins doomed expedition for the passage to the Jeannete, Nansans Farthest North and Mr. Peary's illusion. A must read for arctic enthusiasts, extreme adventure readers and anyone interested in diverse topics.
Seth J. Frantzman
Mr.Champions Mr.Champions
Author Fergus Fleming studied at Oxford University and was a writer and editor at Time Life Books before he became a free lance writer. Written with a trademark wit, the book draws on logs, journals and letters to give a fascinating account of man's quest for the North Pole. Just as Mars is now-- the North Pole was a mystery for the 19th Century explorer. This book picks up where the Barrow's Boys leaves off. It introduces you to some ice-clumped lunatics and some heros and heroines of the Northern arena. Great reading for the beach in the summertime. A bit academic but that's what is so fascinating because it appears to all be true. Sleighs, balloons, dogs, ships, zepppelins -- the last frontier was open for all to conquer. Some did, most didn't but the quest is what makes it so fascinating. What they ate, how they traveled, how they lived, how they raised the money-- they were the Olympians and astronauts of an age long gone by.