cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The basket woman; a book of Indian tales for children
eBook The basket woman; a book of Indian tales for children ePub

eBook The basket woman; a book of Indian tales for children ePub

by Mary Hunter Austin

  • ISBN: 1172294135
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Mary Hunter Austin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Nabu Press (September 10, 2010)
  • Pages: 214
  • ePub book: 1724 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1149 kb
  • Other: txt lit azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 240

Description

The book contains fifteen tales. The first, Basket Woman, for example, tells about a white boy who is afraid of Indians but comes to understand them through dreams. It contains an Indian version of the biblical flood that covered most of the earth.

The book contains fifteen tales. The second, which has the same characters, attempts to teach that the Indians are better off today than their ancestors. The third is about a stream that has a good life and which helps people and vegetation, until it decides to move on to what it thinks will be a better life.

The Basket Woman was the only Indian that he had seen. She would come walking across the mesa with a great cone-shaped carrier basket heaped with brushwood on her shoulders, stooping under it and easing the weight by a buckskin band about her forehead

The Basket Woman was the only Indian that he had seen. She would come walking across the mesa with a great cone-shaped carrier basket heaped with brushwood on her shoulders, stooping under it and easing the weight by a buckskin band about her forehead.

The Arrow-Maker, A Drama in Three Acts. The Land of Little Rain. Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once).

The Basket Woman book. Mary Austin wrote The Basket Woman: A Book Of Indian Tales as a kind of sequel to her masterpiece, The Land of Little Rain. Both books deal with the things she learned, mostly from the local Paiute Indians at the nearby campoodie in the Eastern Sierras. She lived in Independence, California, not far from Lone Pine and even closer to Manzanar, the most famous of the Japanese internment centers during World War Two.

Austin, Mary Hunter, 1868-1934. The basket woman-Second story. The stream that ran away. The coyote-spirit and the weaving woman. The cheerful glacier. The crooked fi. The sugar pine. The white-barked pine.

From photograph by A. A. Forbes THE BASKET WOMAN].

A book of indian tales for children. Boston, new york, and chicago houghton mifflin company. The Riverside Press, Cambridge. From photograph by A. In preparing this volume of western myths for school use the object hasbeen not so much to provide authentic Indian Folk-tales, as to presentcertain aspects of nature as they appear in the myth-making mood, thatis to say, in the form of strongest appeal to the child mind.

One of the early nature writers of the American Southwest, her classic The Land of Little Rain (1903) describes the fauna, flora and people as well as evoking the mysticism and spirituality of the region between the High Sierra and the Mojave Desert of southern California.

Mary Hunter Austin01 January 1910. You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser. eReaders and other devices. To read on E Ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device.

Boston, new york, and chicago houghton mifflin company.

The stream that ran away. Books by Mary Austin. HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY Boston and New York. The Arrow-Maker: A Drama in Three Acts. By Mary Hunter Austin. California The Land of the Sun.

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Comments

Nicanagy Nicanagy
My 5th grade highly gifted daughter read this book after researching Southwest Native American's and deciding to do a research project on basket weaving. Does it talk about Southwest Native American Basket weaving. No, she is just an avid reader and the title caught her attention. You can't pass up a free kindle book so she went for it. I am glad she did. She very much enjoyed the read. She was fascinated by the fact it was written in the early 1900's and she took into account the different perspectives people had on the Native American culture at the time. She was also at first taken a back by the typos she found in the writing. I reminded her that the modern spell check/editing was not around then and that often books did contain many errors. This also fascinated her and she settled into the historical perspective and very much enjoyed the stories. It has inspired her to write a story using the app Twine Threads which lets you make a choose your own adventure type of a story. In it you are a character that is visited by the basket woman and you get to choose if you get into the basket or not to travel back in time to experience Southwest Native American culture. You make decisions on the way what path you take determines your fate.
The creative style writing this book inspired for her made it well worth her time reading it. She very much enjoyed it and recommends it.
Qane Qane
This is a book of folksy tales written from the perspective of the pioneers of the westward expansion. As such, there are two distinct underlying themes; one that the American Indians are better off as they are now, and the second that Europeans are better than Indians. The first two stories were particularly bad, (they're parts one and two of a single story), but the themes popped up in every other story or so--pretty much any tale where the pioneers and Indians came into contact. The other stories were mainly about anthropomorphized landscape features, such as a river or a tree.

Aside from the antiquated values and themes, the stories were fairly well-written, though a few of them dragged at times.

There is an active Table of Contents (though it is not officially linked). There are no illustrations. There is a glossary/pronunciation guide at the very end.

The stories contained are:

The Basket Woman--First Story
The Basket Woman--Second Story
The Stream that Ran Away
The Coyote-Spirit and the Weaving Woman
The Cheerful Glacier
The Merry-go-Round
The Christmas Tree
The Fire Bringer
The Crooked Fir
The Sugar Pine
The Golden Fortune
The White-Braked Pine
Na Yang-Wit'e, the First Rabbit Drive
Mahala Joe
Livina Livina
This 1904 book has interesting original tales about American Indians. Children will enjoy the stories, but it is doubtful that pre-teen youngsters will read them because Austin fills her tales with descriptions of the environment, a subject that does not interest many youngsters. Nevertheless, teens can read and enjoy the stories and parents can read them and retell them to their younger children.

The author writes that she composed her book to be used in schools to help students understood about life, because myths help children learn about life. She warns readers no to try to explain the book's myths to the children, for they need to learn the message through their own life experiences. She says that unless children can relate to myths by themselves, they have "practically no educative value."

The book contains fifteen tales. The first, Basket Woman, for example, tells about a white boy who is afraid of Indians but comes to understand them through dreams. It contains an Indian version of the biblical flood that covered most of the earth. The second, which has the same characters, attempts to teach that the Indians are better off today than their ancestors. The third is about a stream that has a good life and which helps people and vegetation, until it decides to move on to what it thinks will be a better life. The fourth concerns an old Indian woman who is shunned by her people because she has strange eyes that can only see the good in people. She sees the good in an evil man, which changes him, but then, like the others, he ignores her.
Braendo Braendo
I'm using this book as a research book to get to know Mary Austin. She was an amazing woman that was far ahead of her time. I haven't finished the book, but have very much enjoyed what I've read.
Onoxyleili Onoxyleili
it's ok
Zargelynd Zargelynd
Great kindle book. If you are interested in native american readings this is a great book for that,I enojoy reading this tales with the grandchildren and then relating them to now.
Skrimpak Skrimpak
i grew up hearing many of the stories that are in this book. this is a great book to share with any child.
I didn't like it. It downloaded okay but the stories did not grab the children's attention. I deleted it from my Kindle.