cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » CHURCH and SOCIETY IN TRINIDAD Part I II: THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN TRINIDAD 1498-1863
eBook CHURCH and SOCIETY IN TRINIDAD Part I  II: THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN TRINIDAD 1498-1863 ePub

eBook CHURCH and SOCIETY IN TRINIDAD Part I II: THE CATHOLIC CHURCH IN TRINIDAD 1498-1863 ePub

by REV. JOHN T. HARRICHARAN

  • ISBN: 1425943845
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: REV. JOHN T. HARRICHARAN
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: AuthorHouse (September 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 292
  • ePub book: 1527 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1981 kb
  • Other: azw docx docx mbr
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 651

Description

My deepest gratitude goes to Professor .

JOHN T. HARRICHARAN . This Third Volume of the History of the Catholic Church covers the period in Trinidad from 1864-1900. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

The Catholic Church in Trinidad 1498-1863. Books related to Church and Society in Trinidad Part I & Ii. Skip this list.

My deepest gratitude goes to Professor . I am thankful to Ildefons Schroots, .

John, t. The catholic church in trinidad 1498-1863. by JOHN, T. CHURCH and SOCIETY IN TRINIDAD Part I & II. Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove CHURCH and SOCIETY IN TRINIDAD Part I & II from your list? CHURCH and SOCIETY IN TRINIDAD Part I & II. Published March 4, 2005 by AuthorHouse.

The Catholic Church in Trinidad and Tobago is part of the worldwide Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope in Rome. The Apostolic Nuncio to Trinidad and Tobago is, since December 2011, Archbishop Nicola Girasoli, who is also Apostolic Nuncio to other independent states and Apostolic Delegate for the dependent territories in the Caribbean area.

Church and Society in Trinidad Part I & Ii: The Catholic Church in. .

Church and Society in Trinidad Part I & Ii: The Catholic Church in Trinidad 1498-1863. HE records of the early Catholic Churches in this part of the country are very meagre and to the historian most of them are almost useless. His poverty or the difficulty of procuring printed Catholic liturgical books from Europe, or, we are inclined to think, the danger of discovery should such an one with its unmistakable marks of 'Popery' about it (which he probably dispensed with in his manuscript), fall into the hands of heretics, must have led him to this labor of patience and zeal.

The first Catholic church in Trinidad was built in 1591. Capuchins worked there from 1618 to 1803

The first Catholic church in Trinidad was built in 1591. Capuchins worked there from 1618 to 1803. In 1672, Trinidad and adjacent islands were included in the Diocese of Puerto Rico and in 1790 in the Diocese of Santo Tomás de Guayana, now Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Ciudad Bolivar. In 1797, Trinidad came under British control and missionary work continued because freedom of worship was granted to Catholics. In 1818, the Apostolic Vicariate of Trinidad was established, and on 30 April 1850 it was elevated to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Port of Spain in 1850.

IT was a result of my initial thrust into research activity of the Christian Churches among the East Indians in Trinidad during the period of indentureship that I was led to research the history of the Catholic Church in Trinidad. I am therefore indebted to Dr. Brinsley Samaroo for suggesting this topic. My deepest gratitude goes to Professor K.O. Laurence, who guided my research for my M.A. degree. I am thankful to Ildefons Schroots, O.S.B., my confrere, who made available to me the transcripts of the documents of the Vatican Archives, when they were lodged at the Regional Seminary of St. John Vianney and The Ugandan Martyrs. This was made possible by the kind permission of the then Vicar Provincial of the Irish Dominican Order in Trinidad, Fr. Damian Byrne. I am indeed grateful for help I received in the various foreign archives, namely The Public Record Office, London; The National Archives, Madrid; The Simancas Archives at Simanca in Spain; and The National Academy of History in Venezuela. At home, I received immense help from the late Enos Siewlal, Government Archivist and also from Archbishop Anthony Pantin in Archbishop's House Archives, which was extremely limited for the period under study. I would also like to thank Miss Stephanie Thomas who typed the first draft, and June Prempeh who typed the final draft. I would like to thank the ex-Abbot Bernard Vlaar of Mt. St. Benedict, who gave me the green light for higher studies. Most of all I received the greatest help from Mr. Rupert Laydoo, for editing and putting an index to this book. Any inaccuracies that may be found in this work I acknowledge them to be mine. However, I hope this book would be useful in Seminaries, Theological Colleges, Universities, Training Colleges and to all those who are interested in the Ecclesiastical History of Trinidad. Fr. John Thomas Harricharan, M.A. Trinidad.