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eBook The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story ePub

eBook The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story ePub

by Diane Ackerman

  • ISBN: 0393061728
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Diane Ackerman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (September 17, 2007)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1376 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1669 kb
  • Other: lrf azw docx lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 159

Description

Diane Ackerman has been the finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction in addition to many other awards and recognitions for her work, which include the best-selling The Zookeeper's Wife and A Natural History of the Senses. She lives in Ithaca, New York.

Diane Ackerman has been the finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction in addition to many other awards and recognitions for her work, which include the best-selling The Zookeeper's Wife and A Natural History of the Senses. Paperback: 384 pages.

The Zookeeper's Wife. W. norton & company. For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, write to Permissions, W. Norton & Company, Inc.

Home Diane Ackerman The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story. The zookeepers wife a w. .The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story, .

112 quotes from The Zookeeper's Wife: ‘I watched her face switch among the radio .

112 quotes from The Zookeeper's Wife: ‘I watched her face switch among the radio stations of memory’. The Zookeeper's Wife Quotes Showing 1-30 of 112. I watched her face switch among the radio stations of memory ― Diane Ackerman, The Zookeeper's Wife.

I came to this story, as to all of my books, by a very personal route: Both of my maternal grandparents came from Poland

The zookeeper’s wife. I came to this story, as to all of my books, by a very personal route: Both of my maternal grandparents came from Poland.

The Zookeeper's Wife is a non-fiction book written by the poet and naturalist Diane Ackerman. Drawing on the unpublished diary of Antonina Żabińska, it recounts the true story of how Antonina and her husband, Jan Żabiński, director of the Warsaw Zoo, saved the lives of 300 Jews who had been imprisoned in the Warsaw Ghetto following the German invasion of Poland on September 1, 1939. The book was first published in 2007 by W. Norton.

The Zookeeper's Wife is a 2017 war drama film directed by Niki Caro, written by Angela Workman and based on Diane Ackerman's non-fiction book of the same name.

Book includes reading book guide. Includes bibliographical references (p. -349) and index. The true story of how the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo saved hundreds of people from Nazi hands. When Germany invaded Poland, Stuka bombers devastated Warsaw-and the city's zoo along with it. With most of their animals dead, zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski began smuggling Jews into empty cages. Another dozen "guests" hid inside the Zabinskis' villa, emerging after dark for dinner, socializing, and, during rare moments of calm, piano concerts.

Электронная книга "The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story", Diane Ackerman

Электронная книга "The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story", Diane Ackerman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The New York Times bestseller soon to be a major motion picture starring Jessica Chastain. A true story in which the keepers of the Warsaw Zoo saved hundreds of people from Nazi hands.

When Germany invaded Poland, Stuka bombers devastated Warsaw―and the city's zoo along with it. With most of their animals dead, zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski began smuggling Jews into empty cages. Another dozen "guests" hid inside the Zabinskis' villa, emerging after dark for dinner, socializing, and, during rare moments of calm, piano concerts. Jan, active in the Polish resistance, kept ammunition buried in the elephant enclosure and stashed explosives in the animal hospital. Meanwhile, Antonina kept her unusual household afloat, caring for both its human and its animal inhabitants―otters, a badger, hyena pups, lynxes.With her exuberant prose and exquisite sensitivity to the natural world, Diane Ackerman engages us viscerally in the lives of the zoo animals, their keepers, and their hidden visitors. She shows us how Antonina refused to give in to the penetrating fear of discovery, keeping alive an atmosphere of play and innocence even as Europe crumbled around her. 8 pages of illustrations

Comments

Kardana Kardana
The Zookeeper’s Wife, a true story set in Warsaw, Poland at the onset of WWII, is both horrifying and endearing on a scale I’ve not experienced in years. Antonina lives with her husband and small son in a villa on the zoo grounds. They are extremely knowledgeable about the animals in their care; each one with their individual quirks, and all loved like family. The zoo is well ahead of its time in providing natural habitats for its residents. Laid out like a lush garden, it’s a world famous showplace, a haven for both people and animals. Then the Nazis come with their tanks and bombs and total disregard for life. Drunken Gestapo agents shoot animals in their cages for sport. A pig the son is caring for is snatched away and butchered. But somehow the family manages, by one clever ploy after another, to remain at the villa where they daringly rescue Jews and work in the resistance. Yet through all the fear and deprivation, the spirit triumphs.
Yes, at times Ackerman indulges in excessive scene-setting, eulogizing linden trees, for instance. Or she'll go off on a pages-long explanatory tangent - which, despite my impatient nature, nearly always proved fascinating. But all-in-all, I'd have to rank The Zookeeper's Wife right up there with Leon Uris' Mila 18 for a story that will haunt you forever.
Nten Nten
I wanted to like this book. The premise is great and I like that the author tried to incorporate actual quotes from diaries and other historical sources into the story. Unfortunately, this is a case of an author who desperately needed a more assertive editor. There were very long and boring tangents that lost my attention. I put this book down/away multiple times and even considered not finishing it, but then forced myself to finish it because I was reading it for my book club. The thing that I despised most about the book was the changing voice in the writing. Sometimes it was told in first person and then it would suddenly shift to third person. In other words, it would say, "So and so did such and such", and then, "She probably felt X based on this passage" (that would then include a quote from her diary). I would have been OK with either writing style, but the constant switching back and forth was irritating.
Grotilar Grotilar
I have a big interest in WWII history. I was really looking forward to reading this book, especially with all the great reviews I had heard about it. It was selected for my book club, and all of us felt the author was WAY too wordy/descriptive about the most mundane things. For example, there was a whole page listing every type of beetle a man had collected. On top of that, the book seemed very choppy and sometimes hard to follow, it jumped around a lot.
tamada tamada
Reading this book I eventually began to wonder if it was in fact a novel or rather an awkward attempt at yet another history of the much documented and infamous Warsaw Ghetto of World War 2. It frequently bogs down in plodding, excruciatingly boring sidebars and tedious enumerations of names and other details that do nothing to advance whatever the plot is supposed to be. I always try to finish any book I start, but in this case I completely lost interest a little short of halfway and gave it up as a pointless waste of time.
Pringles Pringles
This is such a good book I could not put it down. Such a clever idea to tell the story of the zoo and the Warsaw experience under Nazi rule. I look forward to the movie as I want to see how th e y made a movie from this book. Jack Kushner
Gamba Gamba
I was waiting to see the movie before I wrote my review.....

This book was amazing.......I learned so much about what Warsaw Poland had to deal with during WW2......it is unbelievable how they accomplished all they did and how many were saved because of this underground network....and this family's willingness to help....they must have all been terrorized fearing what could happen if they were caught....the people and their helpers were an amazing group of people.....I kept trying to picture our (US) having to go through something like this......it's horrifying.....

the parts about the actual zoo and the animals and the ones they kept in their homes....was a nice touch to add some pleasure among so much heartache........and what they did to those poor animals.....well, between the people and the animals......I cried many times....I had to shut the book sometimes.....because I was so sad....

It is on my list as one of my favorite books I have read.....

now to the movie.....I think it is always better to read the book first......you learn so much...that being said.....no movie has ever been as good as the book....because they just couldn't make a two hour movie and get everything in the movie.....the movie, however, was very disappointing......I think they could have done a much better job....if you don't want to be disappointed, I'd read the book and forget about the movie....the book is amazing and so well written.....

if you only see the movie, you will be missing out on the entire experience that the book avails you.....you will not really have learned anything about this chapter in WW2.....