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eBook Continuity and Transformation: Religious Synthesis in East Asia (Asian Thought and Culture) ePub

eBook Continuity and Transformation: Religious Synthesis in East Asia (Asian Thought and Culture) ePub

by Sang Jin Ahn

  • ISBN: 082044894X
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Sang Jin Ahn
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Peter Lang Inc., International Academic Publishers (April 15, 2001)
  • Pages: 210
  • ePub book: 1816 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1503 kb
  • Other: txt mbr docx lit
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 931

Description

Continuity and Transformation book.

Continuity and Transformation book. Start by marking Continuity and Transformation: Religious Synthesis in East Asia as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Using two nineteenth- and twentieth-century Korean religious developments (Donghak and Minjung Theology) against the Confucian-Shamanist cultural milieu, Sang Jin Ahn describes religious synthesis as the key to cultural transformation in East Asia.

Continuity and transformation. religious synthesis in East Asia. Includes bibliographical references (p. -206) and index. Asian thought and culture ;, v. 41. by Sang-jin An. Published 2001 by Peter Lang Pub. in New York. Chʻŏndogyo, Minjung theology, Religion.

and continuity in East Asia-although, I should stress at the outset, the emphasis. is decidedly on the former.

Cite this publication. The change or transformation that has garnered the most attention for South. Korea and Taiwan has been in the realm of economics (or, more accurately, po-. litical economy). and continuity in East Asia-although, I should stress at the outset, the emphasis. Still, as will become evident, both are critical to un-. derstanding the political, economic, and social dynamics of individual countries. within East Asia and of the region as a whole. Beyond the Usual Suspects.

; An, Sang-jin, Continuity and Transformation: Religious Synthesis in East Asia (New York: Peter Lang, 2001).

Continuity and Transformation: Religious Synthesis in East Asia Choi, Chungmoo. The Minjung Culture Movement and the Construc- tion of Popular Culture in Korea.

Continuity and Transformation: Religious Synthesis in East Asia. New York: Peter Berg. Beale, Howard K. 1956. Hegemony and Shamanism: The State, the Elite, and the Shamans in Contemporary Korea. Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies.

from traditional East Asian religious thought and culture ^ See Wuji and Taiji for more information about "non-existence" and "existence" in East Asian religious thought.

East Asian religions include many theological stances, including polytheism, nontheism, henotheism, monotheism, pantheism, panentheism and agnosticism. East Asian religions have many Western adherents, though their interpretations may differ significantly from traditional East Asian religious thought and culture. Syncretism is a common feature of East Asian religions, often making it difficult to recognise individual faiths. Further complications arise from the inconsistent use of many terms. See Wuji and Taiji for more information about "non-existence" and "existence" in East Asian religious thought.

It left its imprint not only on its native India, but far beyond, on Southeast Asia, Central Asia, including Tibet and Mongolia, as well as the East Asian countries China, Korea and Japan. Not only has Esoteric Buddhism contributed substantially to the development of Buddhism in many cultures, but it also facilitated the transmission of religious art and material culture, science and technology. This volume, the result of an international collaboration of forty scholars, provides a comprehensive resource on Esoteric Buddhism and the Tantras in their Chinese, Korean, and Japanese contexts from.

The East Asian cultural sphere, or the Sinosphere, consists of nations in East and Southeast Asia that were historically influenced by the Chinese culture, including literary traditions and religions

The East Asian cultural sphere, or the Sinosphere, consists of nations in East and Southeast Asia that were historically influenced by the Chinese culture, including literary traditions and religions.

Confucianism in East Asia's role in the modernization process is not consistent, but at different times and in different stages, different countries have different performance, in general, with the start of modern East Asia, hindered the development of a modern power by actively promoting th. .

Confucianism in East Asia's role in the modernization process is not consistent, but at different times and in different stages, different countries have different performance, in general, with the start of modern East Asia, hindered the development of a modern power by actively promoting the development into power. Even the beginning of modernization in East Asia, Confucian tradition has not completely fade into history, Confucianism in East Asian countries to achieve the transition from the traditional to the modern role in the process is undeniable.

Knowledge of philosophical and religious traditions is important to understanding many aspects of East Asia's diverse cultures.

Using two nineteenth- and twentieth-century Korean religious developments (Donghak and Minjung Theology) against the Confucian-Shamanist cultural milieu, Sang Jin Ahn describes religious synthesis as the key to cultural transformation in East Asia. The synthesis involves the melding of the past (various religious traditions) in view of the present (sociohistorical context). From the particular vantage point of one who is thoroughly familiar with Eastern and Western cultures, Dr. Ahn draws a sketch of East Asian religious traditions and then engages in a dialogue with the contemporary global theological trend.