cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Rabbinic Law in its Roman and Near Eastern Context (Texts and Studies in Ancient Judaism)
eBook Rabbinic Law in its Roman and Near Eastern Context (Texts and Studies in Ancient Judaism) ePub

eBook Rabbinic Law in its Roman and Near Eastern Context (Texts and Studies in Ancient Judaism) ePub

by Catherine Hezser

  • ISBN: 3161480716
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Catherine Hezser
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Mohr Siebeck (December 31, 2003)
  • Pages: 310
  • ePub book: 1280 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1727 kb
  • Other: azw txt lit mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 518

Description

Rabbinic Law in its Roman and Near Eastern Context.

Rabbinic Law in its Roman and Near Eastern Context. Download with Google. Rabbinic Law in its Roman and Near Eastern Context.

Ancient Palestinian and Babylonian rabbinic literature developed in a context of constant exposure to and challenge by the dominant Graeco-Roman and Babylonian cultures. Rabbinic legal thinking is unlikely to have constituted an exception in this regard

Ancient Palestinian and Babylonian rabbinic literature developed in a context of constant exposure to and challenge by the dominant Graeco-Roman and Babylonian cultures. Rabbinic legal thinking is unlikely to have constituted an exception in this regard. What is much mor Ancient Palestinian and Babylonian rabbinic literature developed in a context of constant exposure to and challenge by the dominant Graeco-Roman and Babylonian cultures.

Rabbinic Law in Its Roman and Near Eastern Context - Texts & Studies in Ancient Judaism -'. 'Form, function, and historical significance of the rabbinic story in Yerushalmi Neziqin' - subject- s -: Criticism, interpretation, Narration in rabbinical literature, Parables in rabbinical literature, Talmud. 'Form, function, and historical significance of the rabbinic story in Yerushalmi Neziqin' - subject- s -: Criticism, interpretation, Narration in rabbinical literature, Parables in rabbinical literature, Talmud Yerushalmi. Lohnmetaphorik und Arbeitswelt in Mt 20, 1-16' - subject- s -: Bible, Criticism, interpretation, Laborers in the vineyard - Parable -, Parables in rabbinical literature, Reward - Jewish theology

Catherine Hezser, Professor of Jewish Studies at SOAS, University of. .Jewish Literacy in Roman Palestine (Texts & Studies in Ancient Judaism).

Catherine Hezser, Professor of Jewish Studies at SOAS, University of London. She investigates the ways in which Jews were integrated in the Graeco-Roman context and how they interacted with Romans and Christians in late antiquity. At SOAS she teaches courses on Jews and Judaism from antiquity to modern times. Rabbinic Law in its Roman and Near Eastern Context (Tuebingen: Mohr Siebeck).

Catherine Hezser studied Jewish Studies, Theology and Philosophy at the universities of Muenster and . In her many publications she examines ancient Judaism within the context of Graeco-Roman and early Christian society.

Catherine Hezser studied Jewish Studies, Theology and Philosophy at the universities of Muenster and Heidelberg in Germany and at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in New York. She completed her studies with a Dr. theol. Heidelberg, 1986) and a P. in Jewish Studies (New York, 1992). Hezser is also interested in issues of modern Jewish identity and its literary expressions in Europe, America and Israel.

The importance of Assyriology for biblical studies was widely heralded through the spectacular announcements of George Smith.

T he ancient Near East, until about a century ago, had as its chief witness the text of the Hebrew Bible. Relatively insignificant was the evidence recovered from sources outside the Bible; that which had been found had not been sufficiently understood to serve as a reliable historical source. The importance of Assyriology for biblical studies was widely heralded through the spectacular announcements of George Smith.

Catherine Hezser, Texts and Studies in Ancient Judaism, 132)

Catherine Hezser, Texts and Studies in Ancient Judaism, 132). 65. Gvaryahu, Tannaitic Laws of Battery, 5–20.

Re-thinking Judaism’s Encounter with the Roman Empire. Bibliographical reference type: Article in a Book. Pages numbers: 133-176. Printer-friendly version. Bibliographical references. Title of work: Slaves and Slavery in Rabbinic and Roman Law. Place of publication: Tübingen.

Ancient Near East Studies. History of Ancient Religions. Texts and Studies in Ancient Judaism. Placing Ancient Texts. Studies of Ancient Egypt. Roman Law. Ancient History. The series, founded in 1980 by Martin Hengel and Peter Schäfer, deals with any aspect of Judaism in antiquity from the Second Temple Period to the period of tannaitic and amoraic rabbinic literature. The Ritual and Rhetorical Use of Space Ed. by Mika Ahuvia and Alexander Kocar.

One can conclude that new ancient Near Eastern discoveries continue to.looking at the terminology of Hebrew wisdom and its relationship to Egyptian literature.

One can conclude that new ancient Near Eastern discoveries continue to supply important material for furthering our historical understanding of the Hebrew Bible. Eastern texts and the Hebrew Bible have not always been adequately articulated. agree that the biblical scholar must examine the immediate and wider biblical context before. She has. also done a comparative inquiry into Hebrew and Egyptian wisdom vocabulary, arguing that a.

Ancient Palestinian and Babylonian rabbinic literature developed in a context of constant exposure to and challenge by the dominant Graeco-Roman and Babylonian cultures. Rabbinic legal thinking is unlikely to have constituted an exception in this regard. Yet the positivistic search for influences is increasingly seen as inappropriate in recent scholarship. What is much more important is to investigate the ways in which rabbinic legal thinking participated in ancient Graeco-Roman and Near Eastern legal thinking, to determine which legal topics and forms were shared, where similar conclusions were reached, and where differences can be discerned. In this way the boundaries between ancient Jewish and non-Jewish legal traditions become increasingly blurred.The contributions to this volume, which is the outcome of an interdisciplinary conference held at Trinity College Dublin in March 2002, address a variety of issues. Both internal and external aspects of legal texts are investigated, documentary texts are discussed alongside literary texts, and the Graeco-Roman context of Palestinian legal traditions is supplemented by the Sasanian context of Babylonian halakhah. In addition, the general legal situation in the Roman Empire at large and Roman Palestine in particular is elucidated.