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eBook The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy is ... (Studies in Christian History and Thought) ePub

eBook The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy is ... (Studies in Christian History and Thought) ePub

by Garnet Howard Milne

  • ISBN: 1556358059
  • Category: World
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Garnet Howard Milne
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wipf & Stock Pub (December 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 362
  • ePub book: 1272 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1839 kb
  • Other: doc mbr txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 711

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Studies in Christian History and Thought) on. .This book reconciles this paradox in a detailed study of the writings of the authors of the Westminster Confession of Faith.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In the opening chapter of the Confession, the divines of Westminster included a clause that implied that there would no longer be any special immediate revelation from God. Means by which God had once communicated the divine will. Studies in Christian History and Thought) Paperback – December 1, 2007.

Milne, Garnet Howard. Scholars in puritan studies are increasingly alert to the variety of the movement's theology and spirituality. Garnet Milne's carefully-argued conclusions will provide a major resource for the reassessment of the most critical of puritan doctrines-the sufficiency of Scripture. Long Room Hub Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Print Studies, Trinity College, Dublin. He builds his case by presenting judicious and thorough evidence from a large number of both primary and secondary sources.

By Garnet Howard Milne (foreword Joel Beeke). Studies in Christian History and Thought. Milton Keynes–Waynesboro, GA: Paternoster, 2007. 978 1 84227 521 4 The Westminster Confession of Faith and the cessation of special revelation. The majority Puritan viewpoint on whether extra-biblical prophecy is still possible. By MilneGarnet Howard (foreword Joel Beeke).

by Garnet Howard Milne.

The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether.

Start by marking The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy Is Still Possible as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. The Westminster Confession of Faith, drawn up in London in the 1640s, has been one of the most influential confessions in the history of Reformed theology. The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy Is Stil (Studies in Christian History and Thought). 1842275216 (ISBN13: 9781842275214).

Undoubtedly, the best book on cessationism in the first century of the Reformed tradition is Garnet Milne’s published dissertation The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy I.

Undoubtedly, the best book on cessationism in the first century of the Reformed tradition is Garnet Milne’s published dissertation The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy Is Still Possible (Paternoster, 2007).

Chapter 7 Subscription and the Westminster Confession of Faith . Introduction - 257 . An Ambiguous Cessationist Clause?

For those who may be interested in studying this issue, The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy is Still Possible (2007) by Garnet Howard Milne (foreword by Joel Beeke) seems to be an extremely comprehensive treatment. Chapter 7 Subscription and the Westminster Confession of Faith . An Ambiguous Cessationist Clause?

cessation of special revelation the majority puritan viewpoint on whether extra .

The westminster confession of faith and the cessation of special revelation the majority puritan viewpoint on whether extra biblical prophecy is stil. The westminster confession of faith and the cessation of special revelation the majority puritan viewpoint on whether extra biblical prophecy is stil. Published in: Spiritual. 1. The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy Is Stil Garnet Howard Milne. 2. Publisher : Paternoster Press Release Date

he Westminster divines intended the cessationist clause to affirm that there was to be no more extra-biblical, ‘immediate,’ revelation for any purpose now that th.

While working on another project today I stumbled across Garnet H. Milne, The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Viewpoint on Whether Extra-Biblical Prophecy is Still Possible (Milton Keynes, UK: Paternoster/Eugene OR: Wipf & Stock, 2008). he Westminster divines intended the cessationist clause to affirm that there was to be no more extra-biblical, ‘immediate,’ revelation for any purpose now that the church possessed the completed Scriptures (xvi). Here’s a related reference

The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revel.

In the opening chapter of the Confession, the divines of Westminster included a clause that implied that there would no longer be any special immediate revelation from God. Means by which God had once communicated the divine will, such as dreams, visions, and the miraculous gifts of the Spirit, were said to be no longer available. However, many of the authors of the WCF accepted that "prophecy" continued in their time, and a number of them apparently believed that disclosure of God's will through dreams, visions, and angelic communication remained possible. How is the "cessationist" clause of WCF 1:1 to be read in the light of these claims? This book reconciles this paradox in a detailed study of the writings of the authors of the Westminster Confession of Faith.

Comments

Quynaus Quynaus
A thoroughly interesting book, especially in the light of the face that we are seeing a growing non-cessationalism among New Calvinists.
Zeli Zeli
This book concludes that the authors of the Westminster Confession believed that God still directed people in all of life, but that immediate revelation which came from God had ceased now that the church had the completed Scriptures. Holding tenaciously to the unity of Word and Spirit, they affirmed that nothing can be added that alters the doctrines of the New Testament and no further revelation would be given to show the way of salvation other than what God intended to impart through His Son which is fully contained in Scripture, for all of life and for all history. However, they contended that another form of "mediate" revelation continues, i.e. revelation mediated by the Scriptures, not merely for a greater grammatical of contextual understanding of the Word, but as an application of the already revealed Word of God to the life of an individual, church, or nation. Thus dreams, visions, and spiritual gifts analogous to the miraculous gifts of the Spirit originally displayed by the apostles did not cease but continued as modalities as long as they did not contradict the Unity of the Word and the Spirit. Hence they distinguished between the Holy Spirit and "privates spirits' of individuals whose words do not accord with the Word of God, and whose pronouncements are not prophecy but mere opinions.
Velan Velan
A friend of mine has recommended it highly.... quoted much from it... and have a look at the table of contents and you would soon realize that its a great book on this topic... having skimmed it .... i would love it if this book was available as a kindle book for an affordable price....

Great writing by Garnet Howard Milne
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This review is from: The Westminster Confession of Faith and the Cessation of Special Revelation: The Majority Puritan Viewpoint on Whether Extra-biblical Prophecy Is ... (Studies in Christian History & Thought) (Hardcover)
When the seventeenth-century English Puritan-dominated parliament became embroiled in a conflict with Charles I, the members of the Long Parliament sought military assistance from the Scots. The Scots, however, also desired to see a united Reformation of church and society and proposed a covenant to institute a greater religious uniformity in the three kingdoms. The English parliament established the Westminster Assembly to prepare the documents for that uniformity. One of those documents, the Westminster Confession of Faith, addressed the major theological disputes of the day; one of which centred on whether God still revealed His will outside of the Bible. The book concludes that the Westminster divines believed that God still directed people in all of life, though revelation which came immediately from God had ceased now that the church had the completed Scriptures. In the opening chapter of the Confession, the divines of Westminster included a clause which implied that there would no longer be any special immediate revelation from God. Means by which God had once communicated the divine will, such as dreams, visions, and the miraculous gifts of the Spirit, were said to be no longer available. However, many of the authors of the WCF accepted that `prophecy' continued in their time, and a number of them apparently believed that disclosure of God's will through dreams, visions, and angelic communication remained possible. How is the `cessationist' clause of WCF 1:1 to be read in the light of these claims? This book reconciles this paradox in a detailed study of the writings of the authors of the Westminster Confession of Faith.

`Garnet Milne presents us with a much-needed study.... He builds his case by presenting judicious and thorough evidence from a large number of both primary and secondary sources. It is a fascinating and groundbreaking book...and clarifies a remarkable amount of profound, theological detail.'
Joel R. Beeke, from the Foreword

`Connecting the past to the present is always a difficult but necessary task for the responsible Christian theologian. Dr Milne's work is a good example of how modern questions can be sensitively engaged in a manner which gives due respect to the great formulations of the past without either imposing Procustean criteria on such historic discussions or simply historicising such to the point of irrelevance.'
Carl R. Trueman, Professor of Church History and Historical Theology, Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia, USA

`Scholars in puritan studies are increasingly alert to the variety of the movement's theology and spirituality. Garnet Milne's carefully-argued conclusions will provide a major resource for the reassessment of the
most critical of puritan doctrines - the sufficiency of Scripture.'
Crawford Gribben, Long Room Hub Senior Lecturer in Early Modern Print Studies, Trinity College, Dublin

Garnet H. Milne lives with his wife Carol in Wanganui, New Zealand. He has served as pastor of two Reformed churches in Wainuiomata and Wanganui over the past eleven years. He has contributed to the Westminster Theological Journal and was editor of his denominational magazine Faith in Focus for many years. Dr Milne's doctorate in historical theology, from Otago University, forms the basis of this book. He has lectured at apologetic societies, participated in public debates and is involved extensively in bringing a Christian perspective to political and social issues in his home country.